AMST Systemtechnik GmbH

Austria

AMST Systemtechnik GmbH

Austria
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Patent
Amst Systemtechnik Gmbh | Date: 2015-07-27

A flight simulator, motion simulator or orientation simulator for the spatial movement of at least one person, and in particular for the simulation of acceleration sequences, has a holding device for holding a person in a region of the center. The holding device is mounted on a carriage via a movement device. The carriage can be displaced, in particular linearly, along a horizontally oriented main carrier. The main carrier is rotationally driven about a vertically oriented major axis of rotation and the center is displaceable between a first outer maximum position and a second outer maximum position by moving the carriage along a trajectory on the main carrier. A normal distance between the first outer maximum position of the center and the major axis of rotation is greater than the normal distance between the second outer maximum position of the center and the major axis of rotation.


Patent
AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | Date: 2017-06-07

A device, more particularly a flight simulator, movement simulator or orientation simulator, for spatial movement of at least one person (1) and, more particularly, for simulating sequences of acceleration, wherein a holding device (2) for holding a person (1) in the region of a centre (3) is provided, wherein the holding device (2) is attached to a sled (5) by way of a movement device (4), wherein the sled (5) is displaceable along a horizontally extending main carrier (6) and, more particularly, is linearly displaceable, wherein the main carrier (6) is driven in a manner rotatable about a vertically extending main axis of rotation (7), wherein the centre (3) is displaceable between a first outer maximum position (11) and a second outer maximum position (12) by displacing the sled (5) along a track (10) on the main carrier (6) and wherein the normal distance (13) between the first outer maximum position (11) of the centre (3) and the main axis of rotation (7) is greater than the normal distance (14) between the second outer maximum position (12) of the centre (3) and the main axis of rotation (7).


Nesti A.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | Beykirch K.A.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | Beykirch K.A.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | Pretto P.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | And 2 more authors.
Experimental Brain Research | Year: 2015

To successfully perform daily activities such as maintaining posture or running, humans need to be sensitive to self-motion over a large range of motion intensities. Recent studies have shown that the human ability to discriminate self-motion in the presence of either inertial-only motion cues or visual-only motion cues is not constant but rather decreases with motion intensity. However, these results do not yet allow for a quantitative description of how self-motion is discriminated in the presence of combined visual and inertial cues, since little is known about visual–inertial perceptual integration and the resulting self-motion perception over a wide range of motion intensity. Here we investigate these two questions for head-centred yaw rotations (0.5 Hz) presented either in darkness or combined with visual cues (optical flow with limited lifetime dots). Participants discriminated a reference motion, repeated unchanged for every trial, from a comparison motion, iteratively adjusted in peak velocity so as to measure the participants’ differential threshold, i.e. the smallest perceivable change in stimulus intensity. A total of six participants were tested at four reference velocities (15, 30, 45 and 60 °/s). Results are combined for further analysis with previously published differential thresholds measured for visual-only yaw rotation cues using the same participants and procedure. Overall, differential thresholds increase with stimulus intensity following a trend described well by three power functions with exponents of 0.36, 0.62 and 0.49 for inertial, visual and visual–inertial stimuli, respectively. Despite the different exponents, differential thresholds do not depend on the type of sensory input significantly, suggesting that combining visual and inertial stimuli does not lead to improved discrimination performance over the investigated range of yaw rotations. © 2015, The Author(s).


Nesti A.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | Beykirch K.A.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | Beykirch K.A.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | Pretto P.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | And 2 more authors.
Experimental Brain Research | Year: 2014

While moving through the environment, humans use vision to discriminate different self-motion intensities and to control their actions (e.g. maintaining balance or controlling a vehicle). How the intensity of visual stimuli affects self-motion perception is an open, yet important, question. In this study, we investigate the human ability to discriminate perceived velocities of visually induced illusory self-motion (vection) around the vertical (yaw) axis. Stimuli, generated using a projection screen (70 × 90 deg field of view), consist of a natural virtual environment (360 deg panoramic colour picture of a forest) rotating at constant velocity. Participants control stimulus duration to allow for a complete vection illusion to occur in every single trial. In a two-interval forced-choice task, participants discriminate a reference motion from a comparison motion, adjusted after every presentation, by indicating which rotation feels stronger. Motion sensitivity is measured as the smallest perceivable change in stimulus intensity (differential threshold) for eight participants at five rotation velocities (5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 deg/s). Differential thresholds for circular vection increase with stimulus velocity, following a trend well described by a power law with an exponent of 0.64. The time necessary for complete vection to arise is slightly but significantly longer for the first stimulus presentation (average 11.56 s) than for the second (9.13 s) and does not depend on stimulus velocity. Results suggest that lower differential thresholds (higher sensitivity) are associated with smaller rotations, because they occur more frequently during everyday experience. Moreover, results also suggest that vection is facilitated by a recent exposure, possibly related to visual motion after-effect. © 2014, The Author(s).


Tuschen T.,TU Dresden | Ernst S.,TU Dresden | Beitelschmidt D.,TU Dresden | Prokop G.,TU Dresden | Tischer W.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH
Advanced Vehicle Control AVEC’16 - Proceedings of the 13th International Symposium on Advanced Vehicle Control AVEC’16 | Year: 2017

Driving Simulators have always been a valuable development tool in the automobile industry. Till today they are the only evaluation tool to assess human machine/vehicle interactions. But recent trends in the automobile development process, like autonomous driving functions, show that common driving simulators concepts are not able to meet today’s development requirements. The “auto.mobile-driving simulator”, a wheel based driving simulator approach, addresses this problem by using a completely new motion concept. The fact that the simulator is based on wheels allows it on one hand to be used independently from local restrictions and on the other hand the simulation of high frequent accelerations. For the correct simulation of the vehicle motion and driver perception, an advanced control concept is necessary. Due to the use of wheels as a non-linear force transmission element, contrary to common driving simulator, a quasi-inverted vehicle model is required for the control system. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


Von Lassberg C.,University of Leipzig | Von Lassberg C.,University of Tübingen | Beykirch K.A.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | Beykirch K.A.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Using state-of-the-art technology, interactions of eye, head and intersegmental body movements were analyzed for the first time during multiple twisting somersaults of high-level gymnasts. With this aim, we used a unique combination of a 16-channel infrared kinemetric system; a three-dimensional video kinemetric system; wireless electromyography; and a specialized wireless sport-video-oculography system, which was able to capture and calculate precise oculomotor data under conditions of rapid multiaxial acceleration. All data were synchronized and integrated in a multimodal software tool for three-dimensional analysis. During specific phases of the recorded movements, a previously unknown eye-head-body interaction was observed. The phenomenon was marked by a prolonged and complete suppression of gaze-stabilizing eye movements, in favor of a tight coupling with the head, spine and joint movements of the gymnasts. Potential reasons for these observations are discussed with regard to earlier findings and integrated within a functional model. © 2014 von Laßberg et al.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2008.3.3.4.;AAT.2008.3.4.5. | Award Amount: 4.93M | Year: 2009

The aim of this research project is to investigate the usefulness of advanced flight simulator concepts for teaching pilots to detect and recover from flight upsets. The term flight upset indicates a situation when an aircraft in flight unintentionally exceeds the parameters normally experienced in line operations or training. Loss of control due to unsuccessful upset recovery is considered an important factor in civil aviation accidents. There is a clear need for the simulation of unusual flight attitudes, as a means to train pilots recovery procedures. Exercising these conditions in the real world is unsafe, expensive and, if performed in smaller aircraft, not representative of the situation in transport aircraft. Therefore, ground-based simulation of these extreme conditions is the only viable option for pilot instruction. However, at present, hexapod-based flight simulators used for pilot training are not equipped for this purpose, due to limitations of the mathematical aircraft models, and restricted simulator motion capabilities. We believe that ground-based simulation of upset recovery is feasible when innovations in different research areas will be adequately combined. To demonstrate this, real flight tests will be performed with transport aircraft in unusual attitudes. The recorded motion profiles will serve to extend mathematical aircraft models with engineering tools. In addition, current motion cueing software will be innovated to reproduce the high G-loads and extreme attitudes representative to upset recovery. Then the simulator concept will be evaluated on a new generation flight simulator (DESDEMONA) with advanced motion capabilities, and compared to hexapod-based flight simulators. The final outcome will be a set of requirements for successful ground-based simulation of upset recovery, which will contribute to better pilot training to identify and recover from flight upsets. Hence, this project contributes directly aircraft safety.


Patent
Amst Systemtechnik Gmbh | Date: 2013-05-06

A movement device and a manipulator configuration are provided for contact and/or invasive examination or treatment of the human or animal body under the influence of increased and/or changing acceleration. Wherein a functional head can be moved relative to a base along a plurality of degrees of freedom movable by drive devices and at least one drive device is constituted as a force-limited drive device.


Patent
Amst Systemtechnik Gmbh | Date: 2012-05-21

A device for spatially moving persons includes a first support element, which includes a retaining device for at least one person and which is rotatable about a first rotational axis relative to a second support element. A second support element rotatably mounted about a second rotational axis relative to a third support element. The first rotational axis and the second rotational axis are substantially orthogonal to each other. The device further includes an image playback surface. The retaining device has at least one rotational degree of freedom relative to the image playback surface.


Patent
Amst Systemtechnik Gmbh | Date: 2014-06-13

A self-propelled driving simulator has a machine frame which can be moved by three, preferably four or more, wheel assemblies on an underlying surface. The wheel assemblies each contain at least one wheel which can move on the underlying surface and which is arranged so as to be rotatable about a steering axle. The machine frame is coupled to a cockpit which contains a seat for a person as well as operator control elements for controlling the driving simulator. The cockpit has a degree of freedom of rotational movement with respect to the machine frame, with the result that the cockpit can be rotated with respect to the machine frame about a main rotational axis, and/or wherein the main rotational axis is preferably a normal vector of the plane spanned by the wheel contact faces of the wheels on the underlying surface.

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