AMST Systemtechnik GmbH

Austria

AMST Systemtechnik GmbH

Austria

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Patent
AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | Date: 2017-06-07

A device, more particularly a flight simulator, movement simulator or orientation simulator, for spatial movement of at least one person (1) and, more particularly, for simulating sequences of acceleration, wherein a holding device (2) for holding a person (1) in the region of a centre (3) is provided, wherein the holding device (2) is attached to a sled (5) by way of a movement device (4), wherein the sled (5) is displaceable along a horizontally extending main carrier (6) and, more particularly, is linearly displaceable, wherein the main carrier (6) is driven in a manner rotatable about a vertically extending main axis of rotation (7), wherein the centre (3) is displaceable between a first outer maximum position (11) and a second outer maximum position (12) by displacing the sled (5) along a track (10) on the main carrier (6) and wherein the normal distance (13) between the first outer maximum position (11) of the centre (3) and the main axis of rotation (7) is greater than the normal distance (14) between the second outer maximum position (12) of the centre (3) and the main axis of rotation (7).


Patent
Amst Systemtechnik Gmbh | Date: 2015-07-27

A flight simulator, motion simulator or orientation simulator for the spatial movement of at least one person, and in particular for the simulation of acceleration sequences, has a holding device for holding a person in a region of the center. The holding device is mounted on a carriage via a movement device. The carriage can be displaced, in particular linearly, along a horizontally oriented main carrier. The main carrier is rotationally driven about a vertically oriented major axis of rotation and the center is displaceable between a first outer maximum position and a second outer maximum position by moving the carriage along a trajectory on the main carrier. A normal distance between the first outer maximum position of the center and the major axis of rotation is greater than the normal distance between the second outer maximum position of the center and the major axis of rotation.


Frett T.,German Aerospace Center | Mayrhofer M.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | Schwandtner J.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | Anken R.,German Aerospace Center | Petrat G.,German Aerospace Center
Microgravity Science and Technology | Year: 2014

In July 2013, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne, Germany, commissioned its new medical research facility :envihab. One central element of the facility is a new type of short radius centrifuge called DLR-SAHC 1 (formerly known as :enviFuge), which has been developed in collaboration with AMST Systemtechnik GmbH, Ranshofen, Austria. The shift of subjects above heart-level on a short arm centrifuge allows unique studies on, e.g., the cardiovascular regulation in surroundings with a high gradient of artificial gravity. Equipped with the capacity to move the four nacelles along the acceleration axis simultaneously and independently from each other, the centrifuge allows the possibility to perform up to four complex trials in parallel. The maximal acceleration is 6 g at the foot level and each nacelle can accomodate an up to 150kg payload. Additional equipment can be mounted on two payload bays with a capacity of 100kg each. Standard features of the centrifuge include a motion capturing system with six cameras and two triaxial force plates to study the kinematics of physical exercise (e.g., squatting, jumping or vibration training) under increased gravity. Future projects involving SAHC 1 will allow the development and testing of potential countermeasures and training methods against the negative effects of weightlessness in space on human physiology. Due to the centrifuge’s capability to hold heavy equipment, carrying out a variety of non-human life science experiments requiring complex and heavy hardware is also fully feasible. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Von Lassberg C.,University of Leipzig | Von Lassberg C.,University of Tübingen | Beykirch K.A.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | Beykirch K.A.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Using state-of-the-art technology, interactions of eye, head and intersegmental body movements were analyzed for the first time during multiple twisting somersaults of high-level gymnasts. With this aim, we used a unique combination of a 16-channel infrared kinemetric system; a three-dimensional video kinemetric system; wireless electromyography; and a specialized wireless sport-video-oculography system, which was able to capture and calculate precise oculomotor data under conditions of rapid multiaxial acceleration. All data were synchronized and integrated in a multimodal software tool for three-dimensional analysis. During specific phases of the recorded movements, a previously unknown eye-head-body interaction was observed. The phenomenon was marked by a prolonged and complete suppression of gaze-stabilizing eye movements, in favor of a tight coupling with the head, spine and joint movements of the gymnasts. Potential reasons for these observations are discussed with regard to earlier findings and integrated within a functional model. © 2014 von Laßberg et al.


Nesti A.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | Beykirch K.A.,Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics | Beykirch K.A.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | MacNeilage P.R.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Motion simulators are widely employed in basic and applied research to study the neural mechanisms of perception and action during inertial stimulation. In these studies, uncontrolled simulator-introduced noise inevitably leads to a disparity between the reproduced motion and the trajectories meticulously designed by the experimenter, possibly resulting in undesired motion cues to the investigated system. Understanding actual simulator responses to different motion commands is therefore a crucial yet often underestimated step towards the interpretation of experimental results. In this work, we developed analysis methods based on signal processing techniques to quantify the noise in the actual motion, and its deterministic and stochastic components. Our methods allow comparisons between commanded and actual motion as well as between different actual motion profiles. A specific practical example from one of our studies is used to illustrate the methodologies and their relevance, but this does not detract from its general applicability. Analyses of the simulator's inertial recordings show direction-dependent noise and nonlinearity related to the command amplitude. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio is one order of magnitude higher for the larger motion amplitudes we tested, compared to the smaller motion amplitudes. Simulator-introduced noise is found to be primarily of deterministic nature, particularly for the stronger motion intensities. The effect of simulator noise on quantification of animal/human motion sensitivity is discussed. We conclude that accurate recording and characterization of executed simulator motion are a crucial prerequisite for the investigation of uncertainty in self-motion perception. © 2014 Nesti et al.


Frett T.,German Aerospace Center | Mayrhofer M.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | Schwandtner J.,AMST Systemtechnik GmbH | Petrat G.,German Aerospace Center
Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC | Year: 2013

In 2013, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne, Germany, commissions its new medical research facility:envihab. The main objective of:envihab is to facilitate highly controlled research into the effects of different environmental conditions (e.g. varying ambient air pressure or oxygen content) on humans in long-term studies and the development of appropriate countermeasures and life support systems. One central element of the facility is a new type of short-radius centrifuge called:enviFuge. From past experience with a large number of centrifuge experiments, DLR and AMST Systemtechnik GmbH have developed a unique research and training device in the field of artificial gravity. Equipped with the capacity to instantaneously and independently move the four nacelles along the acceleration axis, the centrifuge allows the possibility to perform up to four complex trials simultaneously. The possibility to shift a subject's heart-level above the center of rotation on a short-radiuscentrifuge allows unique studies about e.g. the cardiovascular regulation in heart surrounding structures with a high gradient of artificial gravity. The maximum acceleration is 6g at the outer perimeter, and each nacelle provides enough space for up to 150 kg payload, additionally 2 × 100 kg equipment can be mounted on the main arm. Standard features of the centrifuge include a 6-camera motion capturing system and two triaxial force plates to study the kinematics of physical exercise (e.g. squatting, jumping, or vibration training) under increased gravity. Cardiovascular training can be performed with passive spinning, locomotion exercises on sliding bed or cycle ergometry and imaging procedures like ultrasound examinations can be done remotely by a compliant robotic arm. Dark environments with full audio and video entertainment and medical monitoring including ECG, blood pressure, Sp02 are available for each nacelle. Future projects involving:enviFuge will allow the development and testing of potential countermeasures and training methods against the negative effects of weightlessness in space on the human physiology. Long term space mission e.g. to Mars will be benefit from the development of new training devices as well as handicapped or bed-ridden patients on Earth.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2008.3.3.4.;AAT.2008.3.4.5. | Award Amount: 4.93M | Year: 2009

The aim of this research project is to investigate the usefulness of advanced flight simulator concepts for teaching pilots to detect and recover from flight upsets. The term flight upset indicates a situation when an aircraft in flight unintentionally exceeds the parameters normally experienced in line operations or training. Loss of control due to unsuccessful upset recovery is considered an important factor in civil aviation accidents. There is a clear need for the simulation of unusual flight attitudes, as a means to train pilots recovery procedures. Exercising these conditions in the real world is unsafe, expensive and, if performed in smaller aircraft, not representative of the situation in transport aircraft. Therefore, ground-based simulation of these extreme conditions is the only viable option for pilot instruction. However, at present, hexapod-based flight simulators used for pilot training are not equipped for this purpose, due to limitations of the mathematical aircraft models, and restricted simulator motion capabilities. We believe that ground-based simulation of upset recovery is feasible when innovations in different research areas will be adequately combined. To demonstrate this, real flight tests will be performed with transport aircraft in unusual attitudes. The recorded motion profiles will serve to extend mathematical aircraft models with engineering tools. In addition, current motion cueing software will be innovated to reproduce the high G-loads and extreme attitudes representative to upset recovery. Then the simulator concept will be evaluated on a new generation flight simulator (DESDEMONA) with advanced motion capabilities, and compared to hexapod-based flight simulators. The final outcome will be a set of requirements for successful ground-based simulation of upset recovery, which will contribute to better pilot training to identify and recover from flight upsets. Hence, this project contributes directly aircraft safety.


Patent
Amst Systemtechnik Gmbh | Date: 2013-05-06

A movement device and a manipulator configuration are provided for contact and/or invasive examination or treatment of the human or animal body under the influence of increased and/or changing acceleration. Wherein a functional head can be moved relative to a base along a plurality of degrees of freedom movable by drive devices and at least one drive device is constituted as a force-limited drive device.


Patent
Amst Systemtechnik Gmbh | Date: 2012-05-21

A device for spatially moving persons includes a first support element, which includes a retaining device for at least one person and which is rotatable about a first rotational axis relative to a second support element. A second support element rotatably mounted about a second rotational axis relative to a third support element. The first rotational axis and the second rotational axis are substantially orthogonal to each other. The device further includes an image playback surface. The retaining device has at least one rotational degree of freedom relative to the image playback surface.


Patent
Amst Systemtechnik Gmbh | Date: 2014-06-13

A self-propelled driving simulator has a machine frame which can be moved by three, preferably four or more, wheel assemblies on an underlying surface. The wheel assemblies each contain at least one wheel which can move on the underlying surface and which is arranged so as to be rotatable about a steering axle. The machine frame is coupled to a cockpit which contains a seat for a person as well as operator control elements for controlling the driving simulator. The cockpit has a degree of freedom of rotational movement with respect to the machine frame, with the result that the cockpit can be rotated with respect to the machine frame about a main rotational axis, and/or wherein the main rotational axis is preferably a normal vector of the plane spanned by the wheel contact faces of the wheels on the underlying surface.

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