Torrance, CA, United States
Torrance, CA, United States

Amonix, Inc. is a solar power system developer based in Seal Beach, California. The company manufactures concentrator photovoltaic products designed for installation in sunny and dry climates. CPV products convert sunlight into electrical energy in the same way that conventional solar photovoltaic technology does, except that they use optics to focus the solar radiation before the light is absorbed by solar cells. According to a comparative study of energy production of solar technologies, CPV systems require no water for energy production and produce more energy per megawatt installed than traditional PV systems. Amonix has nearly 70 Megawatts of CPV solar power systems deployed globally, including Southwestern U.S. and Spain. In May 2012, the Alamosa Solar Generating project, owned and operated by Cogentrix Energy, began commercial operation. This is the largest CPV power plant in the world and is expected to produce enough clean renewable energy per year to power more than 6,500 homes and will avoid the emissions of over 43,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. The Alamosa Solar Generating Project is supported by a power purchase agreement , which is a long-term agreement to sell the power it will generate. Under the project’s PPA, the Public Service Company of Colorado will buy the power generated by the solar facility for the next 20 years. In July 2012, Amonix set the world record for photovoltaic module efficiency at 33.5% under nominal operating conditions, verified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In April 2013, Amonix broke the record set in July 2012, demonstrating photovoltaic module efficiency at 34.9% under normal concentrator standard operating conditions , also verified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In August 2013, Amonix announced it had achieved a 35.9% photovoltaic module efficiency rating under concentrator standard test conditions as calculated by NREL. In June, 2014, the assets of Amonix were acquired by Arzon Solar, LLC for the purpose of continued development of CPV technology and products. Wikipedia.


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Approximately 15 people, one-third of its workforce, were let go from energy storage startup LightSail Energy, according to sources close to the company. The layoffs were generally on the non-tank side of the firm. Rebecca Motola-Barnes, Chief of Staff, "company culture guru" and "Director of People Operations" at LightSail, confirmed that layoffs had taken place. In December of last year, LightSail's Chief Science Officer Danielle Fong ("devoted to the art of invention," according to her bio) appeared on a panel at GTM's 2015 Energy Storage Summit and explained how the compressed-air energy storage (CAES) technology her startup was developing demanded better, cheaper storage tanks to make the above-ground, containerized CAES system pencil out financially. LightSail was working with spun carbon-fiber tanks and new construction techniques. I suggested that if this whole energy storage thing doesn't work out, the company could pivot to building tanks for the multibillion-dollar container industry. Fong laughed it off -- energy storage was the prime directive of the company. According to a February article in the Wall Street Journal, that's exactly what the downsizing company is now doing. The business now "consists of two main elements: an energy-storage component, for which the product is still in development; and high-pressure-storage tanks for natural gas and industrial gases, which it plans to sell primarily to logistics companies that distribute and recover natural gas and to compressed-natural-gas refueling stations. LightSail expects to ship its first such tanks in the next few months." LightSail has raised more than $70 million from the venture arm of French Energy giant Total, Peter Thiel, Bill Gates, Khosla Ventures, and Innovacorp, in pursuit of a CAES system that doesn’t rely on underground caverns as a storage medium. LightSail says its use of spun carbon-fiber tanks has allowed it to solve the cost problems faced by SustainX, which was using traditional steel tanks. LightSail also claims that it has come up with a way to capture and store both the mechanical energy and the thermal energy used in compressing air by injecting a cool water mist into the compression chamber as the air is compressed, reducing the heat that is generated during this step. When the captured pressurized air is released back through the system, the heated water is re-infused into it, allowing that heated air to return more energy. Despite the millions raised and aspirational language that abounds at this Berkeley-based startup, this is the second round of layoffs at the firm in two years. SolarCity Corporation named former Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Chairman Jon Wellinghoff as its chief policy officer. Wellinghoff was the longest-serving chair in FERC's history, leading efforts to integrate solar and wind resources into wholesale electric markets and ensure that resources like demand response and DG were given an opportunity to participate. Wellinghoff also served as General Counsel at the Nevada Public Utilities Commission, as well as serving two terms as the state of Nevada's first Advocate for Customers of Public Utilities. Wellinghoff most recently served as a partner at the law firm Stoel Rives. Wellinghoff is still finishing up at Stoel Rives, but we'll speak with him about his new role later this month. Wellinghoff made a presentation in 2012 that was notable for its vision of more rational energy-pricing markets and its practical graphics. "A Day in the Life of the Grid" revealed that the FERC commissioners get the smart grid and the necessity "to unleash the information and unleash the power" of the American electrical grid, as Wellinghoff put it. His presentation gave an hour-by-hour snapshot of wholesale utility pricing across the Midcontinent Independent System Operator. UBS writes, "We think this move demonstrates SolarCity’s renewed commitment to a more mainstream and credible policy effort after recent setbacks in Nevada.  While we're unclear what Mr. Wellinghoff can do in [Nevada], we certainly expect the former Chair to prove a key force in [maintaining] the status quo in other jurisdictions nationally. The next 1-2 years are likely to see a number of key policy decisions at the state level and we expect SCTY to be increasingly active in both high-volume states and areas the company doesn’t operate in, in order to avoid unconstructive precedents. We expect the [residential] sector to continue to add more mainstream utility executives as it seeks to adopt a less combative approach." Michael Horwitz, formerly with RW Baird, is now a partner at Greentech Capital Advisors. BayWa Solar Systems, a U.S. solar wholesale distributor, added Daniel Marino as its chief commercial officer. Prior to joining BayWa, Marino was senior VP of Sales at Yingli Americas. Kelly Griswold was promoted to VP of business development at Sungevity. Steve Olszewski, currently senior VP of operations at Spruce, will take over from Matt Melius as COO. Olszewski was previously a senior VP at Discover Financial Services. Sara Rafalson was promoted to director of policy and new markets at solar project financier Sol Systems. Laura Franceschini is now program manager for data center sustainability at Google. She was previously program manager at the Yale Center for Business and the Environment. Albert Liu was promoted to director of battery technology at Atieva. Atieva started out in 2007 as a VC-funded battery pack developer with a founder from Tesla and VC funding from Venrock. But last year, Atieva revealed that it was engaged in a large-scale electric-vehicle effort in Silicon Valley. Tassos Golnas, former director of performance analytics at SunEdison, is now technology manager at the Solar Energy Technologies Office at the U.S. Department of Energy, ManTech. In early March, SunEdison's long-time CFO Brian Wuebbels left that role to join YieldCos TerraForm Power and TerraForm Global as CEO. Last week, Wuebbels, one of the architects of SunEdison's current multibillion-dollar edge-of-bankruptcy dilemma, resigned as president and CEO and as a member of the board of directors, effective immediately. According to a release, TerraForm's board has formed an office of the chairman, led by Peter Blackmore, an independent director and chairman of the firm, to lead TerraForm Power on an interim basis. Veteran venture capitalist John Doerr is moving away from his management role at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers to become the firm's first chair. Doerr wrote in a blog post, "As I become chair, our tenured partners -- Ted Schlein, Beth Seidenberg, and Mary Meeker -- will continue to lead with a new generation of managing members -- Mike Abbott, Eric Feng, Wen Hsieh and Mood Rowghani." Doerr has worked at KPCB since 1980. Kleiner's many cleantech investments include Bloom Energy, Nest, Opower, Proterra, Amonix and MiaSolé.


News Article | August 30, 2016
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

A 30-megawatt solar project changing hands is no longer headline news in today's solar industry, or at GTM. But, when that project is the 30-megawatt Alamosa project -- a power plant that happens to be the world's largest operating concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) installation -- that calls for a mention. Korea Electric Power Corp (Kepco) is going to acquire the PV power plant from Carlyle Group‘s Cogentrix Solar Holdings, according to a statement from the utility, in its first move into the American energy industry. The deal was estimated at $34 million by the The Korea Economic Daily. Cho Hwan-ik, president of Kepco, said, "I am glad to secure a beachhead to move into the U.S. power market. We will keep looking for power generation assets for acquisition including wind power, solar, and other renewable energy plants." He explained in a release, "In accordance with the Paris Climate Change deal, Korea must reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 37 percent by 2030. The best way to do this is acquiring renewable energy power plants overseas." CPV is a troubled solar sub-market with roughly 100 megawatts deployed and $500 million invested over the last 10 years, compared to the tens of billions received by the silicon industry. China's Suncore is still in the CPV business. Amonix had to shut down its Las Vegas production facility in 2012 and has rechristened itself as Arzon Solar, with Amonix founder Vahan Garboushian as CEO. Soitec left the CPV business in 2015. SolFocus shut down in 2013. GreenVolts went out of business in 2012. JDSU quietly exited the CPV cell market after acquiring QuantaSol. Energy Innovations, Soliant, Concentrator Optics, SunPower's C7 and Skyline Solar's low-concentration PV (LCPV) have all passed on. Cogenra moved from LCPV-plus-heat to a solar cell mounting business that got bought by SunPower. Solaria is still building or licensing LCPV and solar windows. Early-stage startups such as Morgan Solar, REhnu and Semprius still believe that CPV's economic riddle can be solved. Former Solar Junction CEO Vijit Sabnis told GTM in a previous interview that no other PV technology has the headroom to improve its efficiency like multi-junction solar cells. Sabnis said he saw 50 percent cell efficiency as achievable in a few years -- which could get DC module efficiencies to greater than 40 percent.


News Article | April 4, 2016
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

In early March, SunEdison's long-time CFO Brian Wuebbels left that role to join YieldCos TerraForm Power and TerraForm Global as CEO. Last week, Wuebbels, one of the architects of SunEdison's current multibillion-dollar edge-of-bankruptcy dilemma, resigned as president and CEO and as a member of the board of directors, effective immediately. According to a release, TerraForm's board has formed an office of the chairman, led by Peter Blackmore, an independent director and chairman of the firm, to lead TerraForm Power on an interim basis. Veteran venture capitalist John Doerr is moving away from his management role at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers to become the firm's first chair. Doerr wrote in a blog post, "As I become chair, our tenured partners -- Ted Schlein, Beth Seidenberg, and Mary Meeker -- will continue to lead with a new generation of managing members -- Mike Abbott, Eric Feng, Wen Hsieh and Mood Rowghani." Doerr has worked at KPCB since 1980. Kleiner's many cleantech investments include Bloom Energy, Nest, Opower, Proterra, Amonix and MiaSolé. Ditlev Engel joined DNV GL as CEO of the energy group -- providing testing, certification and advisory services to the energy industry including renewables, power grids and storage, as well as energy usage. Engel previously served as CEO of wind power manufacturer Vestas. Ryan Hanley was promoted to VP of grid engineering solutions at SolarCity. Hanley's group recently authored a white paper, a sort of regulatory-design framework, to provide the first comprehensive accounting of the net societal benefit of the distributed grid. He and his team determined that if California were to fully account for the costs and benefits of distributed energy resources over the next five years, the net societal impact would amount to $1.4 billion in annual benefits. Krysta Harden, the former deputy secretary of the USDA, has joined DuPont as CSO and VP of public policy. DuPont is executing a $120 billion merger with Dow Chemical. DuPont provides PV materials such as Tedlar backsheets and silver pastes. The Solar Energy Industries Association has hired Evelyn Butler to run the trade association’s codes and standards work. Butler comes to SEIA after serving as business development director of solar/PV, energy and power technologies at UL. Butler will also lead SEIA’s environment, health and safety initiatives. Mike Fraenkel, formerly of PVHardware, is now president and GM at solar-mounting hardware vendor Sol Components. Kris Jernstedt, previously with Bentek and ArrayPower is senior VP of sales and marketing at the firm. Enertech Search Partners, an executive search firm with a dedicated cleantech practice, is the sponsor of the GTM jobs column. Enertech Search's client is an intelligent distributed energy storage system that captures solar power and delivers it when needed most. It combines batteries, power electronics, and multiple energy inputs in a UL-certified appliance controlled by software running in the cloud. This client is seeking a sophisticated and energetic market focused COO with strong P&L and commercial leadership experience. In addition, an understanding of the market drivers and challenges of the complex distributed energy markets and experience with the SaaS business model. Azuri Technologies, a commercial provider of "PayGo" solar home systems for rural off-grid communities, appointed Peter Reinartz to its board of directors as part of the company’s expansion plans in East Africa. Rwanda has a goal of bringing electricity to 70 percent of households by 2018, an increase from about 20 percent in 2014. Other off-grid electrification companies include Ignite Power, BBOXX and Off Grid Electric. Off Grid Electric raised $70 million in 2015 alone. Reinartz was previously a managing director of Eaton Towers. Wes Brown was promoted to VP of sales and operations at UtilityAPI, a software startup that automates the process of sharing data between utilities and third-party providers. Solazyme once aspired to produce algae-based biofuel. The company has settled on being a supplier of algae-based ingredients and is looking for a replacement for CEO Jonathan Wolfson, who is now assuming the role of chairman of the board. The firm is changing its name to TerraVia as it focuses on food, nutrition and specialty ingredients. Louis-Philippe Lalonde is now chief marketing officer at Ygrene Energy Fund, a provider of property-assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for residential and commercial sites. Previously, Lalonde served as GM at Akeena Solar and VP at Enecsys.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

According to Stratistics MRC, the Global Concentrated Photovoltaic Market is accounted for $0.89 billion in 2015 and is expected to reach $2.35 billion by 2022 growing at a CAGR of 14.7% during the forecast period. Financial incentives, technology cost reductions and government renewable targets are some of the factors fostering the market growth. With around 90% of the total share, HCPV segment commanded the global market. It is anticipated to observe a robust growth owing to the improved dedicated approach on the part of the industry for enhanced efficiency output. Commercial segment is anticipated to grow at a faster pace owing to rising power demand from residential buildings particularly in developing economies such as India, China, South Korea, and Vietnam. Asia Pacific is anticipated to witness the fastest growth over the forecast period owing to rapid industrialization. Some of the key players in the market include Solar Junction, Zytech Solar, Isofoton S.A., Semprius Inc, Amonix, Sunpower Corporation, Ravano Green Powers, Solarsystem, Magpower, Suncore Photovoltaic Technology Co. Ltd. and Soitec. Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK  o Spain o Rest of Europe       • Asia Pacific o Japan        o China        o India        o Australia        o New Zealand       o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil       o Argentina        o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

Notes: Sales, means the sales volume of CPV Solar Revenue, means the sales value of CPV Solar This report studies sales (consumption) of CPV Solar in Global market, especially in United States, China, Europe, Japan, focuses on top players in these regions/countries, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player in these regions, covering SolFocus USA Emcore USA LORENTZ Germany Amonix USA OPEL USA Green Volts USA Cool Earth Solar USA Abengoa Spain Isofoton Spain Arima Eco Energy Taiwan Comp Solar Taiwan Everphoton Taiwan Suntrix China Sanan Optoelectronics Xiamen Lida Optoelectronics Henan Solar Systems Australia WS Energia Portugal ES System Korea Whitfield UK CPower Italy Square Engineering India Soitec France Hanlong Group China SKYSource China Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share and growth rate of CPV Solar in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like United States China Europe Japan Split by product Types, with sales, revenue, price and gross margin, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into Type I Type II Type III Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of CPV Solar in each application, can be divided into Application 1 Application 2 Application 3 Global CPV Solar Sales Market Report 2016 1 CPV Solar Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of CPV Solar 1.2 Classification of CPV Solar 1.2.1 Type I 1.2.2 Type II 1.2.3 Type III 1.3 Application of CPV Solar 1.3.1 Application 1 1.3.2 Application 2 1.3.3 Application 3 1.4 CPV Solar Market by Regions 1.4.1 United States Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value and Volume) of CPV Solar (2011-2021) 1.5.1 Global CPV Solar Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 1.5.2 Global CPV Solar Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 2 Global CPV Solar Competition by Manufacturers, Type and Application 2.1 Global CPV Solar Market Competition by Manufacturers 2.1.1 Global CPV Solar Sales and Market Share of Key Manufacturers (2011-2016) 2.1.2 Global CPV Solar Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2011-2016) 2.2 Global CPV Solar (Volume and Value) by Type 2.2.1 Global CPV Solar Sales and Market Share by Type (2011-2016) 2.2.2 Global CPV Solar Revenue and Market Share by Type (2011-2016) 2.3 Global CPV Solar (Volume and Value) by Regions 2.3.1 Global CPV Solar Sales and Market Share by Regions (2011-2016) 2.3.2 Global CPV Solar Revenue and Market Share by Regions (2011-2016) 2.4 Global CPV Solar (Volume) by Application Figure Picture of CPV Solar Table Classification of CPV Solar Figure Global Sales Market Share of CPV Solar by Type in 2015 Figure Type I Picture Figure Type II Picture Table Applications of CPV Solar Figure Global Sales Market Share of CPV Solar by Application in 2015 Figure Application 1 Examples Figure Application 2 Examples Figure United States CPV Solar Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure China CPV Solar Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure Europe CPV Solar Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure Japan CPV Solar Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure Global CPV Solar Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Figure Global CPV Solar Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) Table Global CPV Solar Sales of Key Manufacturers (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Sales Share by Manufacturers (2011-2016) Figure 2015 CPV Solar Sales Share by Manufacturers Figure 2016 CPV Solar Sales Share by Manufacturers Table Global CPV Solar Revenue by Manufacturers (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2011-2016) Table 2015 Global CPV Solar Revenue Share by Manufacturers Table 2016 Global CPV Solar Revenue Share by Manufacturers Table Global CPV Solar Sales and Market Share by Type (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Sales Share by Type (2011-2016) Figure Sales Market Share of CPV Solar by Type (2011-2016) Figure Global CPV Solar Sales Growth Rate by Type (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Revenue and Market Share by Type (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Revenue Share by Type (2011-2016) Figure Revenue Market Share of CPV Solar by Type (2011-2016) Figure Global CPV Solar Revenue Growth Rate by Type (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Sales and Market Share by Regions (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Sales Share by Regions (2011-2016) Figure Sales Market Share of CPV Solar by Regions (2011-2016) Figure Global CPV Solar Sales Growth Rate by Regions (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Revenue and Market Share by Regions (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Revenue Share by Regions (2011-2016) Figure Revenue Market Share of CPV Solar by Regions (2011-2016) Figure Global CPV Solar Revenue Growth Rate by Regions (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Sales and Market Share by Application (2011-2016) Table Global CPV Solar Sales Share by Application (2011-2016) Figure Sales Market Share of CPV Solar by Application (2011-2016) Figure Global CPV Solar Sales Growth Rate by Application (2011-2016) Figure United States CPV Solar Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2016) FOR ANY QUERY, REACH US @ CPV Solar Sales Global Market Research Report 2016


This report studies sales (consumption) of CPV Solar in Global market, especially in United States, China, Europe, Japan, focuses on top players in these regions/countries, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player in these regions, covering SolFocus USA Emcore USA LORENTZ Germany Amonix USA OPEL USA Green Volts USA Cool Earth Solar USA Abengoa Spain Isofoton Spain Arima Eco Energy Taiwan Comp Solar Taiwan Everphoton Taiwan Suntrix China Sanan Optoelectronics Xiamen Lida Optoelectronics Henan Solar Systems Australia WS Energia Portugal ES System Korea Whitfield UK CPower Italy Square Engineering India Soitec France Hanlong Group China SKYSource China View Full Report With Complete TOC, List Of Figure and Table: http://globalqyresearch.com/global-cpv-solar-sales-market-report-2016 Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share and growth rate of CPV Solar in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like United States China Europe Japan Split by product Types, with sales, revenue, price and gross margin, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into LCPV(2-100) MCPV(100-300) HCPV(>300) Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of CPV Solar in each application, can be divided into Application 1 Application 2 Application 3 Global CPV Solar Sales Market Report 2016 1 CPV Solar Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of CPV Solar 1.2 Classification of CPV Solar 1.2.1 LCPV(2-100) 1.2.2 MCPV(100-300) 1.2.3 HCPV(>300) 1.3 Application of CPV Solar 1.3.1 Application 1 1.3.2 Application 2 1.3.3 Application 3 1.4 CPV Solar Market by Regions 1.4.1 United States Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.2 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.3 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value and Volume) of CPV Solar (2011-2021) 1.5.1 Global CPV Solar Sales and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 1.5.2 Global CPV Solar Revenue and Growth Rate (2011-2021) 7 Global CPV Solar Manufacturers Analysis 7.1 SolFocus USA 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.1.2 CPV Solar Product Type, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Type I 7.1.2.2 Type II 7.1.3 SolFocus USA CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Emcore USA 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.2.2 128 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Type I 7.2.2.2 Type II 7.2.3 Emcore USA CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 LORENTZ Germany 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.3.2 145 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Type I 7.3.2.2 Type II 7.3.3 LORENTZ Germany CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.4 Amonix USA 7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.4.2 Nov Product Type, Application and Specification 7.4.2.1 Type I 7.4.2.2 Type II 7.4.3 Amonix USA CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.5 OPEL USA 7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.5.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.5.2.1 Type I 7.5.2.2 Type II 7.5.3 OPEL USA CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.6 Green Volts USA 7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.6.2 Million USD Product Type, Application and Specification 7.6.2.1 Type I 7.6.2.2 Type II 7.6.3 Green Volts USA CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.7 Cool Earth Solar USA 7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.7.2 Chemical & Material Product Type, Application and Specification 7.7.2.1 Type I 7.7.2.2 Type II 7.7.3 Cool Earth Solar USA CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.8 Abengoa Spain 7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.8.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.8.2.1 Type I 7.8.2.2 Type II 7.8.3 Abengoa Spain CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.9 Isofoton Spain 7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.9.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.9.2.1 Type I 7.9.2.2 Type II 7.9.3 Isofoton Spain CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.10 Arima Eco Energy Taiwan 7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 7.10.2 Product Type, Application and Specification 7.10.2.1 Type I 7.10.2.2 Type II 7.10.3 Arima Eco Energy Taiwan CPV Solar Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2011-2016) 7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.11 Comp Solar Taiwan 7.12 Everphoton Taiwan 7.13 Suntrix China 7.14 Sanan Optoelectronics Xiamen 7.15 Lida Optoelectronics Henan 7.16 Solar Systems Australia 7.17 WS Energia Portugal 7.18 ES System Korea 7.19 Whitfield UK 7.20 CPower Italy 7.21 Square Engineering India 7.22 Soitec France 7.23 Hanlong Group China 7.24 SKYSource China Global QYResearch ( http://globalqyresearch.com/ ) is the one spot destination for all your research needs. Global QYResearch holds the repository of quality research reports from numerous publishers across the globe. Our inventory of research reports caters to various industry verticals including Healthcare, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Technology and Media, Chemicals, Materials, Energy, Heavy Industry, etc. With the complete information about the publishers and the industries they cater to for developing market research reports, we help our clients in making purchase decision by understanding their requirements and suggesting best possible collection matching their needs.


Patent
Amonix | Date: 2013-12-03

A heat-rejecting optic comprising an optical element and receiving element or layer with intermediate layer between is provided. Refractive indices of the optical element and receiving element or layer are greater than the intermediate layer. The optic may be part of a concentrator assembly or lens concentrator system for photovoltaic cells. The heat-rejecting optic functions to redirect wavelengths of light for which power conversion by a photovoltaic cell is inefficient and which cause undesirable photovoltaic cell heating and damage, reducing photovoltaic cell life. The receiving element or layer and intermediate layer modify the optical element to frustrate the total internal reflection of light that would otherwise occur within the optical element and divert that light into the receiving element or layer.


Apparatus and methods are described including an individual solar power generating and sun sensing cell formed to have a plurality of electrically isolated portions, the output of each portion being monitored and analyzed to determine whether the solar cell is optimally positioned relative to the direction of solar rays to optimize power generation of the solar cell, and also of an array of solar cells which includes the solar power generating and sun sensing cell.


Patent
Amonix | Date: 2011-07-20

A heat-rejecting optic comprising an optical element and receiving element or layer with intermediate layer between is provided. Refractive indices of the optical element and receiving element or layer are greater than the intermediate layer. The optic may be part of a concentrator assembly or lens concentrator system for photovoltaic cells. The heat-rejecting optic functions to redirect wavelengths of light for which power conversion by a photovoltaic cell is inefficient and which cause undesirable photovoltaic cell heating and damage, reducing photovoltaic cell life. The receiving element or layer and intermediate layer modify the optical element to frustrate the total internal reflection of light that would otherwise occur within the optical element and divert that light into the receiving element or layer.


News Article | January 16, 2013
Site: gigaom.com

The notion that a lot of venture capitalists — and in particular Kleiner Perkins — have lost money on cleantech startups is now officially mainstream news, via a long article published in Reuters this week. The article isn’t inaccurate, but it misses a whole lot of nuances including  the big picture global trends of population growth and resource management, the long term play and some of the newer trends of the cleantech sector, and a few of the more successful companies in Kleiner’s cleantech portfolio. We’ve been covering this roller coaster ride, and Kleiner’s plays for years. Back in the summer of 2010, I first wrote “Greentech investing: not working for most;” and in early 2012 I wrote pieces on “the perils of cleantech investing,” as well as “We can thank Moore’s Law for the cleantech VC bust.” Last year I wrote “Kleiner Perkins web woes, add greentech,” and Kleiner is not so great at investing in auto tech. The article does have a pretty amazing tidbit in there, that Doerr dipped into his own pocket for the $2.5 million that Miasole needed to make payroll before it was sold to Hanergy. But here are 5 things I think the article missed: 1). The long-term larger risk, but bigger payoff: A lot of the manufacturing and infrastructure-based cleantech startups have been taking longer to mature and reach commercialization than their digital peers, and they’ve also needed more money. But when some of these rare companies actually do reach scale and are successful, they could be massive players with huge markets. It’s just a different kind of betting — think putting a $100 on 22 on the roulette wheel, versus $5 on a hand of poker. A combination of the two — a small amount of the high risk investments, with a larger amount of the low risk investments — could be a good play. That was one of the reasons why it seems like investor Vinod Khosla is still investing in cleantech startups. Khosla Ventures’ biocrude portfolio company KiOR — which the firm mostly owns — has a potential market that is no less than an opportunity to displace oil in transportation. Imagine if a venture investor owned a big chunk of Exxon Mobil. 2). The bigger trend of population growth and resource management: Many venture capitalists might be steering away from the cleantech investing style of years prior, but the overall global trends that originally drove these early cleantech investments will only continue to grow. These planetary trends aren’t wrong, it’s just that a bunch of the investments that were made weren’t that smart. The world will have 9 billion people by 2050, and energy, water and food will have to be managed much more carefully. The climate is also changing, because too many people are using too many fossil fuel-based resources. Technologies — including IT — that manage these resources and replace them with more sustainable ones will have large markets, particularly in developing countries. 3). Beyond venture: For many cases, the cleantech investing model isn’t a fit for venture capital. But that doesn’t mean it’s not a good fit for other types of investors like private equity and project finance. Google has put a billion dollars into clean power projects, because those can deliver relatively safe and decent returns. Corporate investors — like GE or NRG Energy — are putting money into cleantech startups because it’s more than just a return, it’s a strategic investment. Cleantech innovation will also continue to come out of university and government labs and will be spurred along by government support of basic science research. Does cleantech innovation need a cleantech VC bubble to start changing the world? 4). Kleiner’s portfolio is more nuanced: The Reuters story accurately pointed out Kleiner’s struggling cleantech companies like Fisker, Miasole, Amonix, and others. And also rightly pointed out how the few cleantech companies it backed that went public — like Amyris and Enphase Energy — are now trading below their IPO prices. But the article didn’t mention the exit of solar thermal company Ausra, and also didn’t name some of the more successful and growing companies in Kleiner’s portfolio like Opower, Clean Power Finance, Enlighted, Nest, and RecycleBank. Opower is the energy software company to beat these days. 5). Cleanweb: See a trend in Kleiner’s more successful and growing cleantech startups? They’re mostly software and digital based. The latest trend in cleantech VC investing is the so-called “clean web,” or using social, mobile, and software to management energy and other resources. Some of these companies are pretty interesting and inspiring, like crowd-funding solar site Solar Mosaic. Finally, as a side note, it’s now in vogue to point out how cleantech investors have lost money. Many have. But I think investors that have paved the way for world-changing innovation, and taken large risks to do so, should in part be lauded.

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