Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development

Thiruvananthapuram, India

Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development

Thiruvananthapuram, India
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Joseph S.,Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute | Sabulal B.,Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute | George V.,Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute | George V.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | And 2 more authors.
Acta Pharmaceutica | Year: 2011

In this study, polysaccharides were isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Polyporaceae) and their antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities were investigated using in vivo models. Potential antitumor activity was shown by G. lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) against solid tumor induced by Ehrlich's ascites carcinoma cells. GLP at 100 mg kg-1 body mass showed 80.8 and 77.6 % reduction in tumour volume and tumour mass, respectively, when administered 24 h after tumour implantation. Again, GLP at the same dose but when administered prior to tumour inoculation, showed 79.5 and 81.2 % inhibition of tumour volume and tumour mass, respectively. GLP showed significant dose-dependent activity in carrageenean-induced (acute) and formalin-induced (chronic) inflammation assays. At 100 mg kg-1, GLP exhibited 57.6 and 58.2 % inhibition in carrageenean-induced and formalin-induced assays, respectively.


Rameshkumar K.B.,Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute | Sheeja D.B.A.,Indian National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology | Nair M.S.,Indian National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology | George V.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development
Natural Product Research | Year: 2015

Phytochemical analysis of the rhizome extract of Curcuma ecalcarata, a hitherto uninvestigated south Western Ghats endemic species, resulted in the isolation and identification of the diaryl heptanoid trans, trans-1,7-diphenyl-5-hydroxy-4,6-heptadiene-3-one (1), steroid β-sitosterol (2), flavanone pinocembrin (4) and monoterpenoids piperitenone (3) and 8-hydroxy piperitone (5). HPTLC estimation of pinocembrin in the rhizome revealed the plant as a rich source of pinocembrin (0.37% dry wt.). The rhizome essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analysed by GC-FID, GC-MS and 13C NMR. Among the 30 constituents identified in the oil, monoterpenoids predominated (94.2%) followed by sesquiterpenoids (5.8%). The major compound consisting of 65.2% of the oil was isolated and identified as piperitenone (3). The study highlights the plant as a rich source of the flavanone pinocembrin and the volatile aroma compound piperitenone. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.


Kartik R.,Translational Cancer Research Laboratory | Kartik R.,National Botanical Research Institute | Rao C.V.,Translational Cancer Research Laboratory | Rao C.V.,National Botanical Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Pharmacology | Year: 2010

Objective: The prevalence of oxidative stress may be implicated in the etiology of many pathological conditions. Protective antioxidant action imparted by many plant extracts and plant products make them a promising therapeutic drug for free-radical-induced pathologies. In this study, we assessed the antioxidant potential and suppressive effects of Achyranthes aspera by evaluating the hepatic diagnostic markers on chemical-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: The in vivo model of hepatocarcinogenesis was studied in Swiss albino rats. Experimental rats were divided into five groups: control, positive control (NDEA and CCl 4 ), A. aspera treated (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg b.w.). At 20 weeks after the administration of NDEA and CCl 4 , treated rats received A. aspera extract (AAE) at a dose of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg once daily route. At the end of 24 weeks, the liver and relative liver weight and body weight were estimated. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were assayed. The hepatic diagnostic markers namely serum glutamic oxaloacetic transminase (AST), serum glutamic pyruvate transminase (ALT), serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and bilirubin (BL) were also assayed, and the histopathological studies were investigated in control, positive control, and experimental groups. Results: The extract did not show acute toxicity and the per se effect of the extract showed decrease in LPO, demonstrating antioxidant potential and furthermore no change in the hepatic diagnosis markers was observed. Administration of AAE suppressed hepatic diagnostic and oxidative stress markers as revealed by decrease in NDEA and CCl 4 -induced elevated levels of SGPT, SGOT, SALP, GGT, bilirubin, and LPO. There was also a significant elevation in the levels of SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, and GSH as observed after AAE treatment. The liver and relative liver weight were decreased after treatment with AAE in comparison to positive control group. The architecture of hepatic tissue was normalized upon treatment with extract at different dose graded at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg. b.w. in comparison to positive control group. Conclusion: These results suggest that A. aspera significantly alleviate hepatic diagnostic and oxidative stress markers which signify its protective effect against NDEA and CCl 4 -induced two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis.


Rajith N.P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Ambily D.V.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Dan V.M.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Sree Devi P.,Sree Rama Krishna Mission Charity Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2012

There are distinct biological and gender related differences between man and woman. Because of their special reproductive role, women are at risk of some distinctly gender related disorders. A survey of ethnomedicinal plants used in the rural areas of Kerala gave valuable ethnomedico-botanical information regarding plants used for menstrual disorders. The present study enumerates 19 plant species against Menorrhagia, 26 plant species against Dysmenorrhoea, 25 plant species against Oligomenorrhoea, 5 plant species against Hypomenorrhoea, 4 plant species for Amenorrhoea and 18 plant species which can be included in food during menstrual cycle.


Rajith N.P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Navas M.,Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute | Thaha A.M.,Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute | Manju M.J.,NSS College | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2010

Traditional Knowledge has been used for centuries by indigenous and local communities in healthcare. It is an important factor for sustainability of natural resource management. The women folk of the country play a vital role in the use and mobilization of such biodiversity based knowledge system. The efficacy of this knowledge is time tested and capable of healthcare management in the form of nutraceuticals and pharma food. The study aimed to document the existing system of traditional knowledge and utility pattern of medicinal plants related to pre and post natal care. This resulted in the documentation of 52 plant species belonging to 49 genera and 38 families, as 17 single drugs, 8 formulations of medicated water for bath (Vethuvellam), 5 formulations of nutraceuticals (Kurukkumarunnu), 4 formulations of food (medicated porridge). The plants are enumerated along with local name, type of plants, family name, parts used and mode of administration.


Pushpangadan P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | George V.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Sreedevi P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Ijinu T.P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Ninawe A.,Government of India
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2014

Scheduled caste and scheduled tribe comprises about 16.6% and 8.6%, respectively of India’s population according to the 2011 census. The constitution lists 1108 Scheduled castes across 25 states and about 744 tribes across 22 states in the country. The tribals live in an around forests and other difficult terrains. They acquired unique knowledge about the use of many wild flora and fauna. Most of these are either lesser known or hither to unknown to the outside world. The treasure of traditional knowledge (TK) if subjected to scientific scrutiny could benefit human kind in many ways. The inroads of modernization are presently posing a threat to this TK and these are in imminent danger of losing out, this age old wisdom and expertise can be lost for all times to come. The rich diversity of traditional communities and biological resources of the country are endowed with primary advantage of evolving innumerous ethnobiological knowledge. The Tribal Co–operative Marketing Development Federation of India Limited (TRIFED) was set up with an aim to serve the interest of the tribal communities and to work for their socio-economic development by conducting its affairs in a professional, democratic and autonomous manner for undertaking marketing of tribal products. The Ethnozoological knowledge of the communities covers the edible, medicinal and therapeutic properties of animal products. However, in recent past the time-tested traditional knowledge is eroding fast, which need urgent attention. To achieve the aim of accelerating the economic development of tribal people by providing wider exposure to their art and crafts, TRIBES INDIA, the exclusive shops of tribal artifacts were set up all over India by TRIFED. They showcase and market the art and craft items produced by the tribal people and thus espouse their magical and mystical art and culture. © 2014 National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved.


Pushpangadan P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | George V.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2010

Resurgence of public interest in the ethnomedical practices in both the developing and developed countries is increasing. As a result, the trade of herbal products in the national and international market is also growing. The rich biodiversity and associated knowledge system particularly in Asia are well known. Over 8,000 wild plant species with about 1,75,000 specific preparations are known to the tribal communities alone. Native food as a medicine particularly during the pregnancy and child raring are noteworthy. The finer aspects of native food are now incorporated in the novel designs of food and nutrition. Homestead garden and the kitchen are connected with the food and ecosystem based sustainable living. The loss of local traditions and associated knowledge system (Ethnomedicine) is resulting in poor health of mother and child especially among the rural poor. Recognition of the native healers and the time tested ethnomedical practices are therefore important in mother and childcare even in modern times.


Pushpangadan P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech products Development | Dan V.M.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech products Development | Ijinu T.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech products Development | George V.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech products Development
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2012

The food we eat, the beverages we drink and the nutrients we consume have a direct link to the culture, customs and beliefs we have inherited over the millennia. The food and drinking habit of people vary from place to place and these are largely influenced by the ambient biological wealth and environment. Further, food and drinking habits are influenced by weather and climtic conditions. India, being a vast country with a multitude of climatic, cultural, racial and religious diversities provide delightful gastronomic variations to the discerning connoisseurs. The ethnic food and beverages of different regions of India have been developed by generations of people keeping in view of the nutritional needs of the common man right from the craddle to the grave. Our ancestors have designed different types of food and beverages keeping in view of the nutritional needs of people of different age groups such as growing children, youth, working class, pregnant and nursing mothers, the sick and the old. The Ayurvedic concept of Rasayana therapy is now being confirmed by the recent advancements in genomics. Nutrigenomics, nutrigenetics, proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomics, etc. have substantiated the holistic approach adopted by the Ayurvedic acharyas in dealing with human health and nutrition. In this article an attempt has beeen made to review our rich and varied ethnic food and beverages.


Rameshkumar K.B.,Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute | Sudheesh N.,Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute | George V.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Mohanan N.,Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute
Journal of Essential Oil Research | Year: 2011

The essential oil from the roots of Cyperus compressas Linn. (Cyperaceae) collected from south India was analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Twenty-two compounds, representing 90.5% of the oil were identified. The oil has been characterized by the predominance of sesquiterpenoids (89.9%), with caryophyllene oxide (34.0%) and cyperene (25.6%) being the major constituents. © 2011 Allured Business Media.


Ijinu T.P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Anish N.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Shiju H.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | George V.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development | Pushpangadan P.,Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2011

The present study comprises of field trips in different rural localities of Kollam and Thiruvananthapuram districts of Kerala. Information regarding the occurrence of plant species, their local names, parts ued, formulations and vegetable preparations through interviews and discussions held with elderly persons of rural communities were recorded. The plant specimens were identified and herbarium sheets prepared for all the species. From the information documented and also from literature data, 9 vegetable plants having high nutrient value were selected. 16 medicinal plants which are used to prepare primary health care remedies, suitable for cultivation and raising in home gardens were also selected. Quality seeds/planting materials were collected from Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) and supplied to selected rural families of each Gramapanchayat for raising home gardens. Awareness programmes on healthy living, balanced diet, hygiene, maintaining clean environment, rain water harvesting and conservation of biodiversity in association with Grama panchayat officials and selected Self Help Groups were conducted in these districts.

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