AMES Inc.

Louisville, CO, United States

AMES Inc.

Louisville, CO, United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

AMES, Iowa, May 09, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Renewable Energy Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:REGI) today announced that the Company will attend the following investor conferences: Renewable Energy Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:REGI) is a leading provider of cleaner, lower carbon intensity products and services. We are an international producer of biomass-based diesel, a developer of renewable chemicals and are North America's largest producer of advanced biofuel. REG utilizes an integrated procurement, distribution, and logistics network to convert natural fats, oils, greases, and sugars into lower carbon intensity products. With 14 active biorefineries, a feedstock processing facility, research and development capabilities and a diverse and growing intellectual property portfolio, REG is committed to being a long-term leader in bio-based fuel and chemicals.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

AMES, Iowa, May 09, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Renewable Energy Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:REGI) today announced that the Company will attend the following investor conferences: Renewable Energy Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:REGI) is a leading provider of cleaner, lower carbon intensity products and services. We are an international producer of biomass-based diesel, a developer of renewable chemicals and are North America's largest producer of advanced biofuel. REG utilizes an integrated procurement, distribution, and logistics network to convert natural fats, oils, greases, and sugars into lower carbon intensity products. With 14 active biorefineries, a feedstock processing facility, research and development capabilities and a diverse and growing intellectual property portfolio, REG is committed to being a long-term leader in bio-based fuel and chemicals.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AMES, Iowa - Technology continues to change the way students learn and engage with their peers, parents and community. That is why Emily Howell, an assistant professor in Iowa State University's School of Education, is working with teachers to develop new ways to incorporate digital tools in the classroom, including playing games such as Pokémon GO. The focus of Howell's work is two-fold -- to give students equitable access to technology and help them build multimodal communication skills. That means not only using technology to consume information or replace traditional classroom tools, but experimenting with new forms of communication, she said. Instead of having students read a book on a tablet or use the computer to type an assignment, they need to learn how to create and upload videos or build graphics and maps to convey their message. Howell's suggestion of having students play Pokémon GO to build these skills may seem a bit unconventional. However, after playing the smartphone game with her own children, she saw how it could help students with writing and research in ways that align with Common Core standards. Howell says engaging students through Pokémon GO, a game many are already playing outside the classroom, also generates interest and connects students to their work. "It is important to give students authentic choices that really have meaning in their lives," Howell said. "We need to encourage them to develop questions, research the answers and then share that information in writing." For example, a common assignment is to have elementary students write an essay on how to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich - a task students can easily explain, but not a genuine question many have, Howell said. Pokémon GO, like many video games, provides players with limited information or what Howell describes as "just in time learning." As a result, players have questions about how to use certain tools or advance to the next level. Playing the game with her own children, Howell watched their enthusiasm in researching and finding the answers to these questions. They were even more excited to share their knowledge with her and their grandmother, who was also playing the game. In a paper published in the journal The Reading Teacher, Howell explains how teachers can have students identify questions about Pokémon GO, find the answers and present their findings in different formats. Using different modes of communication Pokémon GO incorporates different modes of communication - gestures, visuals and directions - which makes it a good fit for the classroom, Howell said. Players see the character on their phone, the character is integrated into a map and the player controls catching the character. Pokémon GO illustrates the need to understand multimodal text, which reflects how we communicate with others, she said. "We don't just send a text or email; we have a live chat or video conferences. Anytime teachers can find something that students are already doing, and comes in multimodal form, they can harness that interest and teach students about the tool's potential," Howell said. Even more than conventional tools such as a paper and pen, teachers must provide a framework for using digital tools. Howell says students need to understand conventional literacy skills, but also learn how to upload files or design elements on a page that are not in a linear progression. "It's not just giving students the technology and letting them play, it's really guiding that interaction so they can express meaning," Howell said. To make the assignment even more authentic, Howell suggests giving students an outlet to share their work with people outside of the classroom. Many school districts create secure, online platforms where students can share work with family and friends and receive feedback. Knowing that others will view their work helps students develop writing styles for different audiences, not just their teacher, Howell said. "It makes the assignment more authentic and helps with motivation and understanding the purpose for writing," she said. "It has academic as well as social benefits." Howell received a grant from the Center for Educational Transformation at the University of Northern Iowa to help elementary teachers in Iowa integrate technology into their writing lessons. The goal is to engage students in writing so that they are using digital tools to create content, rather than strictly consume information.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

AMES, Iowa--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Workiva (NYSE:WK) today announces its planned participation at two upcoming investor conferences. Stuart Miller, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, plans to present at the following: Both events will be webcast live, and a recording will be available for a limited time under the “News and Events” section on the company’s investor relations website (http://investor.workiva.com/). About Workiva Workiva (NYSE:WK) delivers Wdesk, an intuitive cloud platform that modernizes how people work within thousands of organizations, including over 70 percent of the FORTUNE 500®. Wdesk is built upon a data management engine, offering controlled collaboration, data integration, granular permissions and a full audit trail. Wdesk helps mitigate risk, improves productivity and gives users confidence in their data-driven decisions. Workiva employs more than 1,200 people with offices in 16 cities. The company is headquartered in Ames, Iowa. For more information, visit workiva.com. Claim not confirmed by FORTUNE or Time Inc. FORTUNE 500® is a registered trademark of Time Inc. and is used under license. FORTUNE and Time Inc. are not affiliated with, and do not endorse products or services of, Workiva Inc.


Demand for circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] measurements has exploded due to its relationship with many serious health problems. The present study was designed to investigate the validity of samples " spiked" with 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 [25(OH)D2] or 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] to determine their analytical recovery by the DiaSorin LIAISON 25 OH Vitamin D Total Assay (DiaSorin Assay) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 25(OH)D was measured in nine volunteers taking large daily doses of vitamin D2 for 2 weeks. Samples were obtained pre-supplementation and 1 week following vitamin D2. Pre-supplementation samples were used for exogenous recovery studies by adding 25(OH)D2 or 25(OH)D3. Endogenous 25(OH)D [25(OH)D2 plus 25(OH)D3] concentrations reported by the DiaSorin Assay or detected by HPLC were in excellent agreement. However, exogenously added 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 were under-recovered by the DiaSorin Assay. NIST vitamin D standards containing serum from another species (horse) or exogenous 25(OH)D2 were similarly affected when using the DiaSorin Assay. Exogenous 25(OH)D2, 25(OH)D3 or serum from other species added to human samples is inappropriate in determining the analytical recovery of vitamin D compounds when using the DiaSorin Assay. Only endogenous 25(OH)D2 and/or 25(OH)D3 contained in human blood samples should be utilized for this purpose. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


A tablet computer includes a front display assembly and a rear housing that receives the front display assembly on a first side thereof. The tablet computer further includes a controller assembly that is coupled to a second side of the rear housing. The controller assembly has a controller housing and PCB assembly disposed in the controller housing. The PCB assembly has a microprocessor, a PCB, and a first I/O port connector. The controller housing has a first side wall with an aperture extending therethrough that is disposed adjacent to the first I/O port connector. The tablet computer further includes a first panel that is removably coupled to a portion of the second side of the rear housing such that the first panel and the first side wall define a first elongated aperture therebetween.


Patent
AMES Inc. | Date: 2014-08-11

An inlet conduit assembly for a hose reel assembly includes a clip assembly that is structured to be accessible from the outer side of the frame assembly. The clip assembly is structured to be operated without the use of tools. The clip assembly, essentially, prevents the inlet conduit assembly from being moved axially once installed. In this configuration, a user may quickly and easily actuate the clip assembly to release or engage the inlet conduit assembly. Thus, a user may quickly and easily remove the inlet conduit assembly.


Patent
AMES Inc. | Date: 2014-07-18

A head assembly for a rake is provided. The head assembly includes a base portion, a handle coupling, and a number of tines. Each tine includes an elongated body. Each tine body includes a first end, a flexure portion, an offset portion, and a distal second end. The tines includes a first set of tines and a second set of tines. A number of tine bodies in the first set of tines have an offset portion lateral cross-sectional aspect ratio that is greater than 1.0. A number of tine bodies in the second set of tines have an offset portion lateral cross-sectional aspect ratio that is less than 1.0.


Patent
AMES Inc. | Date: 2015-01-14

A watering assembly is provided. The watering assembly includes a reservoir body, a support assembly, a wicking assembly, and an inlet assembly. The reservoir body defines an enclosed space. The support assembly is structured to support soil. The support assembly is coupled to the reservoir body. The wicking assembly includes a number of wicking elements; the wicking elements are coupled to at least one of the reservoir body or support assembly. The wicking elements extend from the reservoir enclosed space to a location outside the reservoir enclosed space. The inlet assembly is coupled to the reservoir body and structured to provide fluid communication from a location outside the reservoir enclosed space to the reservoir enclosed space. When the reservoir body, the support assembly, the wicking assembly and the inlet assembly are assembled, the reservoir body, the support assembly, the wicking assembly and the inlet assembly form a contained watering assembly.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.71K | Year: 2012

Current electric energy storage (EES) technologies cannot meet the requirement of both high power density and high energy density for portable electronics in general and gun fired munitions in particular. Advanced Materials and Energy Systems, Inc. (AMES) plans to resolve this issue by developing a novel High Density UltraCapacitor (HDUC). The innovation of the proposed HDUC is the use of ultrahigh permittivity dielectric composite being developed in AMES as the dielectric layers of multilayer capacitors. Thus the proposed HDUC will possess power density matching the capacitor, and energy density much higher than the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries. The key issue of proposed work is to develop a dielectric polymer composite with Silicon based Amorphous Ceramic (SAC) as the filler. The composite will possess the ultrahigh dielectric permittivity, high dielectric strength, and high bulk resistivity. SAC is a new class of ceramics with a novel electric and dielectric property. Most recently, AMES has developed a SAC with dielectric permittivity many orders of magnitude higher than traditional dielectric materials. For this Phase I project, AMES will investigate the process to fabricate a SAC composite, characterize the properties of produced composite, also study the ability of energy absorption with high charging rate, perform the feasibility studies on the developing and prototyping this dielectric material for high power and energy density EES that would meet all military requirement.

Loading AMES Inc. collaborators
Loading AMES Inc. collaborators