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News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: phys.org

Avoid low-quality and contaminated pet food with information about recalls from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Veterinary Medical Association. Credit: Colorado State University Pet food recalls have made headlines in recent weeks, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that eight brands of cat, dog and rabbit food have been pulled from store shelves since the start of 2017. These foods have been recalled for containing possibly low levels of vitamin B1 and for carrying disease-causing bacteria, pieces of metal, and traces of the animal euthanasia agent pentobarbital. Pet owners may find information about recalled pet food by visiting the FDA website. More information about pet food adulterated with pentobarbital is available in this FDA news release. The American Veterinary Medical Association also provides information about pet food recalls and alerts on its website. Pet food recalls occur for many reasons. In general, the process exists to protect consumers from food that does not meet quality standards or is tainted with pathogens, excess or deficiency in vitamins or minerals, and contamination with toxins. Two recent pet food recalls have resulted from contamination with pentobarbital, a drug used in veterinary practice for humane euthanasia of sick or injured animals. Five dogs reportedly became ill after eating the food; one died, according to the FDA. Pentobarbital is not allowed in pet food, and adulterated food should not be legally sold. "t is not acceptable to use animals euthanized with a chemical substance in pet or animal foods," an FDA spokesperson told Food Safety News. The FDA, in coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is investigating the products that tested positive for pentobarbital to determine a possible cause for the drug's presence. The agency is focusing on suppliers of beef ingredients for pet food, it announced. How do you know if your pet's food is safe? It is important to choose food from companies that follow supply-chain regulations and enforce quality controls, including testing of products to detect problems before food reaches the marketplace. To know more about a manufacturer's quality control measures, contact the company directly. Manufacturers are expected to test both raw materials and finished products to ensure food safety. Many recent recalls have involved raw pet food and canned pet food. Canned food is cooked at high temperatures to ensure it is free from pathogens. However, this process may also lead to vitamin and amino acid degradation if not done properly or if these nutrients are not supplied in sufficient amounts. Raw pet food presents higher risk for pathogen contamination and foodborne illness. Several recent recalls have resulted from food contamination with the infectious bacteria Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Cooking food at high temperatures is the most effective way to eliminate pathogens, therefore raw pet food – including frozen, fresh and freeze-dried food – presents a higher risk for contamination. For this reason, the AVMA discourages raw diets for pets and provides more information in its policy on "Raw or Undercooked Animal-Source Protein in Cat and Dog Diets." If you are worried that your pet ate a contaminated food, contact your veterinarian or an emergency veterinary clinic.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

RICHMOND, Texas, Feb. 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- February is National Pet Dental Health Month. During this time, Kindred Care Pet Hospital is making an extra effort to raise awareness of good dental care for dogs and cats. Pet owners may not expect veterinarians to tell them that their dogs and cats have periodontal disease, yet, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats have at least the beginnings of gum disease by the time they are three years old. “Pet owners often joke about their cat or dog's bad breath,” Kindred Care Pet Hospital veterinarian Dr. Paul Fidelis says, “but often they don't realize that severe halitosis may be a sign of dental infection getting ready to spread to internal organs.” In addition to bad breath, other signs of pet periodontal disease include discolored teeth and gums, teeth that are chipped, cracked, loose or missing, swollen gums, and discomfort when eating. "Annual dental checkups are important," Dr. Paul Fidelis says. "We show pet owners obvious signs of trouble and explain what isn't so obvious, including tartar below the gum line that feeds bacteria." Tartar forms from plaque, a sticky, colorless film on teeth caused by the combination of mouth bacteria in saliva. An animal's body perceives the bacteria as an invader that the immune system needs to attack. The immune system sends white blood cells to battle the bacteria, which results in gum inflammation and loss of tissue and bone. Following a dental exam, Dr. Fidelis says, he tells pet owners whether cleaning and any corrective work is necessary, such as extractions. Pet dental procedures require anesthesia, he explains, because it makes the process safer and more comfortable for both pets and veterinarians. Dr. Fidelis suggests placing a little bit of flavored pet toothpaste (beef, chicken, and seafood, for example) on a finger and gently rubbing it up and down on a pet's teeth. "Do it daily for about a week and then try a soft pet toothbrush," Dr. Fidelis suggests. "Some tiny toothbrushes fit on a fingertip to make brushing easier." Kindred Care Pet Hospital is a full-service Richmond veterinary clinic. In addition to dental care, it provides wellness exams, vaccinations, spay and neuter operations, diagnostics including digital imaging, surgery, and emergency care. The clinic is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. For appointments, call (281) 265-0009 or visit their website at http://kindredcarepet.net/ for more information.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TOPEKA, Kan., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. today announced its support of National Pet Dental Health Month. This special month is sponsored by the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), a non-profit veterinary organization, and is meant to raise awareness of the need for dental care in companion animals. Animal Clinic of North Topeka recognizes that dental care is needed to prevent pain and debilitation in pets and offers a full array of services to keep the animals' mouths healthy and free of problems. Just as with humans, dogs and cats can develop a full array of dental problems if care is not taken to prevent them. These include cavities, cracking and breaking of teeth, periodontal disease, and more. Even so, many people still think that animals don't need dental care. National Pet Dental Health Month was created to help dispel this myth and improve care among the pet population. "It's a common misconception that dogs and cats have teeth that take care of themselves. Domestic pets are in very different conditions than their wild counterparts. This is good for the animals in most ways – it provides a steady food supply, protection from predators, and treatment for disease – but it does have a couple of drawbacks. One of the drawbacks is that commercial pet food does not adequately remove tartar from the teeth," explained Dr. Bryan Stancliffe, DVM. Several measures are recommended for preserving the health of the teeth of dogs and cats. The first is the same as for humans: brushing the teeth. Since pets can't brush their own, owners should attempt to do it for them. If started young, the majority of pets will learn to tolerate this on a daily basis. Older animals, however, may refuse to go along with the procedure. For them, special tartar-fighting treats are available. Though these aren't quite as effective as a toothbrush, they are better than providing nothing at all. The next step is the dental cleaning. In pets, this requires general anesthesia, so it is done on an as-needed basis. A veterinarian will let the pet owner know when this is recommended. Professional cleanings are essential for preventing periodontal disease. If larger problems have arisen, tooth extraction may be needed. This is typically done instead of root canal treatment. It is also required if a tooth has cracked, broken, or otherwise developed problems that would cause pain to the pet. Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. offers teeth cleaning and extractions for pets. They also offer a full array of other veterinary services, parasite prevention, emergency appointments, boarding, and grooming. For more information on their services and hours, visit their website at http://animalclinicoftopeka.com/.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TOPEKA, Kan., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. today announced its support of National Pet Dental Health Month. This special month is sponsored by the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), a non-profit veterinary organization, and is meant to raise awareness of the need for dental care in companion animals. Animal Clinic of North Topeka recognizes that dental care is needed to prevent pain and debilitation in pets and offers a full array of services to keep the animals' mouths healthy and free of problems. Just as with humans, dogs and cats can develop a full array of dental problems if care is not taken to prevent them. These include cavities, cracking and breaking of teeth, periodontal disease, and more. Even so, many people still think that animals don't need dental care. National Pet Dental Health Month was created to help dispel this myth and improve care among the pet population. "It's a common misconception that dogs and cats have teeth that take care of themselves. Domestic pets are in very different conditions than their wild counterparts. This is good for the animals in most ways – it provides a steady food supply, protection from predators, and treatment for disease – but it does have a couple of drawbacks. One of the drawbacks is that commercial pet food does not adequately remove tartar from the teeth," explained Dr. Bryan Stancliffe, DVM. Several measures are recommended for preserving the health of the teeth of dogs and cats. The first is the same as for humans: brushing the teeth. Since pets can't brush their own, owners should attempt to do it for them. If started young, the majority of pets will learn to tolerate this on a daily basis. Older animals, however, may refuse to go along with the procedure. For them, special tartar-fighting treats are available. Though these aren't quite as effective as a toothbrush, they are better than providing nothing at all. The next step is the dental cleaning. In pets, this requires general anesthesia, so it is done on an as-needed basis. A veterinarian will let the pet owner know when this is recommended. Professional cleanings are essential for preventing periodontal disease. If larger problems have arisen, tooth extraction may be needed. This is typically done instead of root canal treatment. It is also required if a tooth has cracked, broken, or otherwise developed problems that would cause pain to the pet. Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. offers teeth cleaning and extractions for pets. They also offer a full array of other veterinary services, parasite prevention, emergency appointments, boarding, and grooming. For more information on their services and hours, visit their website at http://animalclinicoftopeka.com/.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TOPEKA, Kan., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. today announced its support of National Pet Dental Health Month. This special month is sponsored by the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), a non-profit veterinary organization, and is meant to raise awareness of the need for dental care in companion animals. Animal Clinic of North Topeka recognizes that dental care is needed to prevent pain and debilitation in pets and offers a full array of services to keep the animals' mouths healthy and free of problems. Just as with humans, dogs and cats can develop a full array of dental problems if care is not taken to prevent them. These include cavities, cracking and breaking of teeth, periodontal disease, and more. Even so, many people still think that animals don't need dental care. National Pet Dental Health Month was created to help dispel this myth and improve care among the pet population. "It's a common misconception that dogs and cats have teeth that take care of themselves. Domestic pets are in very different conditions than their wild counterparts. This is good for the animals in most ways – it provides a steady food supply, protection from predators, and treatment for disease – but it does have a couple of drawbacks. One of the drawbacks is that commercial pet food does not adequately remove tartar from the teeth," explained Dr. Bryan Stancliffe, DVM. Several measures are recommended for preserving the health of the teeth of dogs and cats. The first is the same as for humans: brushing the teeth. Since pets can't brush their own, owners should attempt to do it for them. If started young, the majority of pets will learn to tolerate this on a daily basis. Older animals, however, may refuse to go along with the procedure. For them, special tartar-fighting treats are available. Though these aren't quite as effective as a toothbrush, they are better than providing nothing at all. The next step is the dental cleaning. In pets, this requires general anesthesia, so it is done on an as-needed basis. A veterinarian will let the pet owner know when this is recommended. Professional cleanings are essential for preventing periodontal disease. If larger problems have arisen, tooth extraction may be needed. This is typically done instead of root canal treatment. It is also required if a tooth has cracked, broken, or otherwise developed problems that would cause pain to the pet. Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. offers teeth cleaning and extractions for pets. They also offer a full array of other veterinary services, parasite prevention, emergency appointments, boarding, and grooming. For more information on their services and hours, visit their website at http://animalclinicoftopeka.com/.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

RICHMOND, Texas, Feb. 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- February is National Pet Dental Health Month. During this time, Kindred Care Pet Hospital is making an extra effort to raise awareness of good dental care for dogs and cats. Pet owners may not expect veterinarians to tell them that their dogs and cats have periodontal disease, yet, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats have at least the beginnings of gum disease by the time they are three years old. “Pet owners often joke about their cat or dog's bad breath,” Kindred Care Pet Hospital veterinarian Dr. Paul Fidelis says, “but often they don't realize that severe halitosis may be a sign of dental infection getting ready to spread to internal organs.” In addition to bad breath, other signs of pet periodontal disease include discolored teeth and gums, teeth that are chipped, cracked, loose or missing, swollen gums, and discomfort when eating. "Annual dental checkups are important," Dr. Paul Fidelis says. "We show pet owners obvious signs of trouble and explain what isn't so obvious, including tartar below the gum line that feeds bacteria." Tartar forms from plaque, a sticky, colorless film on teeth caused by the combination of mouth bacteria in saliva. An animal's body perceives the bacteria as an invader that the immune system needs to attack. The immune system sends white blood cells to battle the bacteria, which results in gum inflammation and loss of tissue and bone. Following a dental exam, Dr. Fidelis says, he tells pet owners whether cleaning and any corrective work is necessary, such as extractions. Pet dental procedures require anesthesia, he explains, because it makes the process safer and more comfortable for both pets and veterinarians. Dr. Fidelis suggests placing a little bit of flavored pet toothpaste (beef, chicken, and seafood, for example) on a finger and gently rubbing it up and down on a pet's teeth. "Do it daily for about a week and then try a soft pet toothbrush," Dr. Fidelis suggests. "Some tiny toothbrushes fit on a fingertip to make brushing easier." Kindred Care Pet Hospital is a full-service Richmond veterinary clinic. In addition to dental care, it provides wellness exams, vaccinations, spay and neuter operations, diagnostics including digital imaging, surgery, and emergency care. The clinic is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. For appointments, call (281) 265-0009 or visit their website at http://kindredcarepet.net/ for more information.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

RICHMOND, Texas, Feb. 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- February is National Pet Dental Health Month. During this time, Kindred Care Pet Hospital is making an extra effort to raise awareness of good dental care for dogs and cats. Pet owners may not expect veterinarians to tell them that their dogs and cats have periodontal disease, yet, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats have at least the beginnings of gum disease by the time they are three years old. “Pet owners often joke about their cat or dog's bad breath,” Kindred Care Pet Hospital veterinarian Dr. Paul Fidelis says, “but often they don't realize that severe halitosis may be a sign of dental infection getting ready to spread to internal organs.” In addition to bad breath, other signs of pet periodontal disease include discolored teeth and gums, teeth that are chipped, cracked, loose or missing, swollen gums, and discomfort when eating. "Annual dental checkups are important," Dr. Paul Fidelis says. "We show pet owners obvious signs of trouble and explain what isn't so obvious, including tartar below the gum line that feeds bacteria." Tartar forms from plaque, a sticky, colorless film on teeth caused by the combination of mouth bacteria in saliva. An animal's body perceives the bacteria as an invader that the immune system needs to attack. The immune system sends white blood cells to battle the bacteria, which results in gum inflammation and loss of tissue and bone. Following a dental exam, Dr. Fidelis says, he tells pet owners whether cleaning and any corrective work is necessary, such as extractions. Pet dental procedures require anesthesia, he explains, because it makes the process safer and more comfortable for both pets and veterinarians. Dr. Fidelis suggests placing a little bit of flavored pet toothpaste (beef, chicken, and seafood, for example) on a finger and gently rubbing it up and down on a pet's teeth. "Do it daily for about a week and then try a soft pet toothbrush," Dr. Fidelis suggests. "Some tiny toothbrushes fit on a fingertip to make brushing easier." Kindred Care Pet Hospital is a full-service Richmond veterinary clinic. In addition to dental care, it provides wellness exams, vaccinations, spay and neuter operations, diagnostics including digital imaging, surgery, and emergency care. The clinic is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. For appointments, call (281) 265-0009 or visit their website at http://kindredcarepet.net/ for more information.


News Article | February 12, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Parents, beware: accidental poisoning from pet medicines is likely to happen among children when less attention is given to storing these seemingly harmless veterinary medications. The warning in your disinfectant and pesticide packaging to "Keep Out Of Reach Of Children," must be applied to pet medicines, too. Some 74.1 million households in the United States own at least one pet. There were at least 78 million dogs living in the household as pets back in 2012. And half of these households have children below 19. The results of a new study published in the journal Pediatrics revealed that accidental poisoning is high among children 19 years old or younger. Preventable poisonings among children accounted for more than 60,000 emergency cases and almost one million calls to poison centers; 48 percent of annual calls made to poison centers involved children below five years old. From 1999 to 2013, the Central Ohio Poison Center, for instance, recorded 1,431 cases of accidental poisoning among children. Eighty-seven percent of these calls involved children below five years old. Eighty-eight percent of the exposures were related to pet medicines for canine, whether they were through ingestion (94 percent) and ocular (2.1 percent) or skin contact (1.1 percent), with most of these cases happening at home. "It's much more common than we thought," COPC Director Henry Spiller, one of the authors of the study, said. The research indicated that these accidental poisonings had no serious medical effect. Parents are urged, however, to pay attention to storing medicines, including medicines for pets, carefully. At Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, parents are counselled on medication safety. These pet medicines may appear "yummy candy to kids," Dr. Tanya Altmann, founder of Calabasas Pediatrics, said. It is a must, she said, that these medicines are kept out of children's reach. She reminded parents that children are curious and eager to explore everything. The children might "accidentally get into something that they shouldn't," she added. To prevent accidental poisoning, parents must ensure that medicines are stored in child-resistant containers, and pet medicines must be stored separately from human medications. Dr. Michael Topper of the American Veterinary Medical Association advised pet owners when administering medicines to their pets. "If pet owners are unsure on how to give it, before they leave the vet, ask them to give lessons on how to give pills to your pet," Topper said. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

RICHMOND, Texas, Feb. 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- February is National Pet Dental Health Month. During this time, Kindred Care Pet Hospital is making an extra effort to raise awareness of good dental care for dogs and cats. Pet owners may not expect veterinarians to tell them that their dogs and cats have periodontal disease, yet, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats have at least the beginnings of gum disease by the time they are three years old. “Pet owners often joke about their cat or dog's bad breath,” Kindred Care Pet Hospital veterinarian Dr. Paul Fidelis says, “but often they don't realize that severe halitosis may be a sign of dental infection getting ready to spread to internal organs.” In addition to bad breath, other signs of pet periodontal disease include discolored teeth and gums, teeth that are chipped, cracked, loose or missing, swollen gums, and discomfort when eating. "Annual dental checkups are important," Dr. Paul Fidelis says. "We show pet owners obvious signs of trouble and explain what isn't so obvious, including tartar below the gum line that feeds bacteria." Tartar forms from plaque, a sticky, colorless film on teeth caused by the combination of mouth bacteria in saliva. An animal's body perceives the bacteria as an invader that the immune system needs to attack. The immune system sends white blood cells to battle the bacteria, which results in gum inflammation and loss of tissue and bone. Following a dental exam, Dr. Fidelis says, he tells pet owners whether cleaning and any corrective work is necessary, such as extractions. Pet dental procedures require anesthesia, he explains, because it makes the process safer and more comfortable for both pets and veterinarians. Dr. Fidelis suggests placing a little bit of flavored pet toothpaste (beef, chicken, and seafood, for example) on a finger and gently rubbing it up and down on a pet's teeth. "Do it daily for about a week and then try a soft pet toothbrush," Dr. Fidelis suggests. "Some tiny toothbrushes fit on a fingertip to make brushing easier." Kindred Care Pet Hospital is a full-service Richmond veterinary clinic. In addition to dental care, it provides wellness exams, vaccinations, spay and neuter operations, diagnostics including digital imaging, surgery, and emergency care. The clinic is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. For appointments, call (281) 265-0009 or visit their website at http://kindredcarepet.net/ for more information.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TOPEKA, Kan., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. today announced its support of National Pet Dental Health Month. This special month is sponsored by the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), a non-profit veterinary organization, and is meant to raise awareness of the need for dental care in companion animals. Animal Clinic of North Topeka recognizes that dental care is needed to prevent pain and debilitation in pets and offers a full array of services to keep the animals' mouths healthy and free of problems. Just as with humans, dogs and cats can develop a full array of dental problems if care is not taken to prevent them. These include cavities, cracking and breaking of teeth, periodontal disease, and more. Even so, many people still think that animals don't need dental care. National Pet Dental Health Month was created to help dispel this myth and improve care among the pet population. "It's a common misconception that dogs and cats have teeth that take care of themselves. Domestic pets are in very different conditions than their wild counterparts. This is good for the animals in most ways – it provides a steady food supply, protection from predators, and treatment for disease – but it does have a couple of drawbacks. One of the drawbacks is that commercial pet food does not adequately remove tartar from the teeth," explained Dr. Bryan Stancliffe, DVM. Several measures are recommended for preserving the health of the teeth of dogs and cats. The first is the same as for humans: brushing the teeth. Since pets can't brush their own, owners should attempt to do it for them. If started young, the majority of pets will learn to tolerate this on a daily basis. Older animals, however, may refuse to go along with the procedure. For them, special tartar-fighting treats are available. Though these aren't quite as effective as a toothbrush, they are better than providing nothing at all. The next step is the dental cleaning. In pets, this requires general anesthesia, so it is done on an as-needed basis. A veterinarian will let the pet owner know when this is recommended. Professional cleanings are essential for preventing periodontal disease. If larger problems have arisen, tooth extraction may be needed. This is typically done instead of root canal treatment. It is also required if a tooth has cracked, broken, or otherwise developed problems that would cause pain to the pet. Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. offers teeth cleaning and extractions for pets. They also offer a full array of other veterinary services, parasite prevention, emergency appointments, boarding, and grooming. For more information on their services and hours, visit their website at http://animalclinicoftopeka.com/.

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