American Veterinary Medical Association

Schaumburg, IL, United States

American Veterinary Medical Association

Schaumburg, IL, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

OCALA, Fla., April 30, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Pet owners should be aware of the benefits of a thorough dental cleaning for a beloved pet. Pets are put under for dental cleanings for their safety and so that they can receive a comprehensive cleaning experience. Dental disease can impact the oral health and general health of a pet. There are misconceptions surrounding anesthesia-free pet dental cleanings and the staff at Town & Country Animal Hospital wants pet owners to have the details needed to make an informed choice about their pet dental cleanings. The American Veterinary Dental College (AVDC) recommends putting pets under anesthesia for their dental cleaning. Some veterinarians offer Anesthesia Free Dentistry or No Anesthesia Dentistry (NAD), however, pet owners should be aware that this approach may not be the best choice for a pet. In many cases anesthesia is the only way to preform dental procedures such as, scaling and remove the plaque and tartar buildup beneath the gum line. Reaching and removing tartar that breeds bacteria commonly seen in pets with periodontal disease. In addition, pets go through unnecessary stress and potential danger when restrained during a NAD cleaning session. Even with a high level of restraint, it is impossible to restrict all movement creating more risk around sharp dental tools.  Anesthesia keeps pets safe with minimal stress by allowing them to wake up after all the cleaning is complete.  The American Animal Hospital Association, American Veterinary Medical Association, and the AVDC all agree that no pet should have anesthesia free dental cleanings. Pet owners experience a false sense of security when their pet receives an anesthesia-free dental cleaning. Pets do not receive the deep cleaning necessary for a complete evaluation and are still susceptible to the development of periodontal disease. Teeth look whiter, but plaque, tartar, and bacteria may continue to exist just below the gum line. As periodontal disease progresses, it may be necessary to address loose teeth, discomfort, and other pet health issues. “Pet owners need to know of the difference anesthesia can make during a pet dental cleaning,” said Dr. Kelly Culbertson, DVM. “Gum disease is far too common. In order to effectively prevent and treat gum disease, pet owners should schedule a cleaning under anesthesia for a beloved pet.” Dr. Kelly Culbertson, DVM and the staff at Town & Country Animal Hospital, serve pets and owners in Ocala and the surrounding areas. They offer high-quality pet wellness care, pet surgery, veterinary dermatology, and more. Services include puppy and kitten care, pet dental, pet surgery, and wellness care. Call (352) 840-7020 to learn about anesthetic pet dental cleaning services at Town & Country Animal Hospital or to schedule an appointment. Visit http://www.bestocalavet.com/ for more information.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

In honor of National Pet Identification Week, which runs from April 16-22, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA) urges people to use identification devices on their pets to increase the likelihood that lost pets return home. One in three pets gets lost in their lifetime, making it imperative to take preventative measures such as using regular and digital identification tags, microchips and/or tattoos. A collar with an identification tag provides physical proof of ownership, informing a person who finds the pet that it has a home. Digital identification tags are growing in popularity among pet owners as many people own mobile devices. Digital identification tags store phone numbers and email addresses of veterinarians, pet sitters, family members and friends. Ultimately, the most effective form of identification is a microchip, a permanent identification device the size of a rice granule inserted under the pet’s skin. Microchips significantly increase the chance of a lost pet reuniting with their owner. In fact, microchipped dogs are more than twice as likely to be returned to their owners, and microchipped cats are more than 20 times as likely to be reunited with their owners. However, microchips are only effective with up-to-date registration information in the microchip registry. When microchipped pets are not returned home, it is typically because of incorrect or missing owner information in the microchip registry, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and HomeAgain. “A microchip that has not been registered is useless because no address or phone number is linked to its unique identification number, and there is no way to return the animal home,” said Kira Ramdas, DVM, a TVMA member who practices at Just Cats Veterinary Services in The Woodlands, Texas. “Similarly, it is important to update contact information in the registry after a move or a transfer of ownership.” To update the pet’s registration records, pet owners will need the microchip number and to create an account with their manufacturer to access registration information in the future. AVMA recommends pet owners make sure all of their information is correct, specifically their phone numbers and addresses. For pet owners who don’t have their pets microchipped, AVMA and the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) encourage scheduling an appointment with a family veterinarian for the procedure. “While a microchip is no guarantee your lost pet will be brought home, it is a form of insurance that every shelter and veterinary clinic evaluates for when a stray or found pet arrives at our doors,” Dr. Ramdas said. Have questions about your pet’s health while not in the veterinary clinic? TexVetPets.org brings the pet owner-veterinarian relationship online by offering information that is written and reviewed by Texas veterinarians. For more information on microchips, please visit https://www.texvetpets.org/article/microchip-old-block. About the Texas Veterinary Medical Association Founded in 1903, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association is a professional association composed of more than 3,700 veterinarians committed to protecting public health, promoting high educational, ethical and moral standards within the veterinary profession and educating the public about animal health and its relationship to human health. For more information, call 512/452-4224 or visit http://www.tvma.org.


LOS ANGELES, April 6, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The number of postal employees attacked by dogs nationwide reached 6,755 in 2016 — more than 200 higher than the year before. The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) released its annual ranking of top dog attack cities today, highlighted safety initiatives to help protect its employees and offered tips to pet owners. "Even good dogs have bad days," said U.S. Postal Service Safety Director Linda DeCarlo in Los Angeles, where postal employees suffered 80 attacks — more than any other city in 2016. "Dog bite prevention training and continuing education are important to keep pet owners, pets and those who visit homes — like letter carriers — happy and healthy." Forty cities make up the top 30 dog attack city rankings (see chart below). Enhancing Employee Safety DeCarlo highlighted USPS safety measures that alert letter carriers to dogs on their delivery routes. The Package Pickup application on usps.com asks customers to indicate if there are dogs at their addresses when they schedule package pickups. This information is provided to letter carriers on their delivery scanners, which also can send real-time updates if an unleashed dog is reported in a delivery area. "The scanners that Postal Service letter carriers use to confirm a customer's delivery include a feature for carriers to indicate the presence of a dog at an individual address," said DeCarlo. "This information is particularly helpful for substitute carriers who fill in for regular carriers on their days off." DeCarlo was in Los Angeles to kick off National Dog Bite Prevention Week, which runs Sunday, April 9 through Saturday, April 15. The Postal Service, joined by the American Humane, American Veterinary Medical Association, Insurance Information Institute and State Farm Insurance, is driving home the message that dog bites are a national issue and education can help prevent dog attacks. Half of the 4.5 million Americans bitten by dogs annually are children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). DeCarlo gave the following tips and encouraged sharing them using the hashtag #preventdogbites. Click this link to a video on dog bite prevention tips. • If a letter carrier delivers mail or packages to your front door, place your dog in a separate room and close that door before opening the front door. Dogs have been known to burst through screen doors or plate-glass windows to attack visitors. Dog owners should keep the family pet secured. • Parents should remind their children and other family members not to take mail directly from letter carriers in the presence of the family pet, as the dog may view the letter carrier handing mail to a family member as a threatening gesture. • The Postal Service places the safety of its employees as a top priority. If a letter carrier feels threatened by a dog, or if a dog is loose or unleashed, the owner may be asked to pick up mail at a Post Office until the letter carrier is assured the pet has been restrained. If the dog is roaming the neighborhood, the pet owner's neighbors also may be asked to pick up their mail at the area's Post Office. 2016 Dog Attack Rankings by City A total of 6,755 postal employees were attacked by dogs in calendar year 2016. The top 30 city rankings are comprised of 40 cities as more than one city experienced the same number of attacks. Rank City 2016 1 LOS ANGELES CA 80 2 HOUSTON TX 62 3 CLEVELAND OH 60 4 SAN DIEGO CA 57 5 LOUISVILLE KY 51 6 DETROIT MI 48 7 DENVER CO 47 8 CHICAGO IL 46 9 INDIANAPOLIS IN 44 10 MINNEAPOLIS MN 43 11 SAN ANTONIO TX 42 12 PORTLAND OR 41 13 DALLAS TX 41 14 PHILADELPHIA PA 40 15 COLUMBUS OH 39 16 BALTIMORE MD 36 17 PHOENIX AZ 35 18 CHARLOTTE NC 33 18 MEMPHIS TN 33 18 FORT WORTH TX 33 19 ST LOUIS MO 31 19 SEATTLE WA 31 20 SACRAMENTO CA 30 20 KANSAS CITY MO 30 21 BUFFALO NY 28 22 BROOKLYN NY 27 23 ST PAUL MN 26 24 NEW ORLEANS LA 25 25 CINCINNATI OH 24 26 WICHITA KS 23 26 OAKLAND CA 23 27 LONG BEACH CA 22 27 FLUSHING NY 22 28 SAN JOSE CA 21 28 LAS VEGAS NV 21 28 AKRON OH 21 29 OKLAHOMA CITY OK 20 29 RICHMOND VA 20 30 FRESNO CA 19 30 WASHINGTON DC 19 The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations. Media Contacts Media are encouraged to contact local USPS spokespersons to conduct interviews or follow letter carriers on their rounds. Related contacts: American Humane, Mark Stubis, marks@americanhumane.org, 202.677.4227; American Veterinary Medical Assn., Sharon Granskog, sgranskog@avma.org, 847.285.6619; Insurance Information Institute, Loretta Worters, lorettaw@iii.org, 212.346.5545; and, State Farm Insurance, Missy Dundov, missy.dundov.sg5r@statefarm.com, 309.766.7087. Please Note: For broadcast quality video and audio, photo stills and other media resources, visit the USPS Newsroom. Follow us on twitter.com/USPS and like us at facebook.com/USPS. For more information about the Postal Service, visit usps.com and usps.com/postalfacts. Photos accompanying this release are available at:


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Activ4Pets, provider of online and mobile platforms that give pet parents easy access to their pet’s health information along with web-based veterinary consultations, is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Kevin Ross Kimber, M.S., D.V.M. as its new Chief Veterinary Medical Officer. Dr. Kimber brings over 15 years of veterinary experience to Activ4Pets and will provide progressive veterinary leadership for Activ4Pets ‘s Mobile health platform, including guidance on best practices for Activ4Pets preventative pet health care resources to help pet parents be more proactive about their pet’s well-being. Dr. Kimber will serve as the Chief Veterinary Medical Officer of Activ4Pets and well as its sister company, Activ4Vets, which provides staffing and peer consultation services to veterinary professionals. Dr. Kimber holds a Masters in Zoology from Cornell University, graduating from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2001. A member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Dr. Kimber is licensed to practice Veterinary Medicine in New York and Minnesota, with licensure pending in Florida. Dr. Kimber’s expertise include Small Animal and Exotic Medicine with clinical interests in dermatology, internal medicine, preventive medicine, infectious diseases and epidemiology, behavior, dentistry, nutrition, and ophthalmology. Dr. Kimber has published on a wide variety of topics in journals such as the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, the Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine and the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, and he has held positions in a variety of local, state, and international education and research programs. He has clinical experience in rural, urban, and suburban small animal and exotic animal practices. “We are incredibly pleased to welcome Dr. Kimber to the Activ4Pets family,” said Florent Monssoh CEO and founder of Activ4Pets. “His wealth of experience in veterinary medicine and his commitment to the care of both pets and their owners will be invaluable in guiding Activ4Pets toward its goal of providing accessible, affordable, and quality veterinary care to pet parents everywhere.” Dr. Kimber will help forward Activ4Pets mission of bringing reliable, widely available, and cost effective veterinary care to pet parents across the nation. The first telemedicine platform for veterinary care, Activ4Pets is designed to address some of the biggest concerns facing pet parents when it comes to the health of their pets including rising vet costs, the complications of maintaining and accessing health records (especially during travel or with new vets), and keeping up with checkups, medications, and vaccinations. “The telemedicine model has been used for several years in human medicine, with positive results from the patient and the provider viewpoint,” said Dr. Kimber. I’m excited to join the wonderful team at Activ4Pets in bringing this powerful model to veterinary medicine and help bring busy pet parents convenient, affordable, accessible pet care tools. The maintenance of centralized records will also aid researchers in gathering real-world data regarding common diseases in pets, and will prove clinically invaluable to pets, pet parents, and their veterinarian.” Activ4Pets allows pet parents to track their pet’s entire medical history, medication and appointment information, as well as find location based information on groomers, sitters, pet friendly locations, emergency care, etc. all through the easy to use Activ4Pets App or through the Activ4Pets web platform. What’s more, Active4pets offers e-consults with licensed veterinarians through a simple web-chat format, allowing pet parents to save on money and travel for simple routine problems or questions, while simultaneously providing expert advice whenever they need it, wherever they may be – even when they are outside the practice range of their regular veterinarian. Activ4Pets is the first company of its kind, enabling pet owners to access their pet's complete health history and even consult with their veterinarian online – all via an easy to use web or mobile app based platform. The platform is accessible anytime, anywhere on the planet. With Activ4Pets you are never more than a click away from your pet's wellness information.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

With massive tornadoes hitting Texas the end of April, taking at least four lives, injuring dozens more and destroying countless homes, it couldn’t be more timely to recognize National Animal Disaster Preparedness Day. The awareness event serves as a call-to-action to prepare for not only tornadoes but also all types of emergencies, and the Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA) urges pet owners to include pets in disaster preparation plans. One of the key components of developing a disaster preparation plan is establishing an evacuation strategy, which involves determining how to get your pets safely out of the house and off the property and finding a safe place to stay. Many disaster shelters do not accept pets, so find one that does ahead of time or secure an alternative safe haven for your pets. Consider making arrangements for boarding in case of home destruction. In addition to dogs and cats, it is crucial to plan ahead and make sure farm animals and livestock are also accounted for. It is important to assemble a survival kit for each of your pets. Just as humans need food, water and additional items such as medication, pets will need an ample supply of these things as well. In the kits, there should be at least three days worth of food and water, photos of pets for identification, proof of health care, emergency contact information and your veterinarian’s contact information. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has species-specific guides and resources available to the public to ensure you have all possible necessities. Making sure your pet is properly identified is also imperative. If your pets happen to get lost during an evacuation or a disaster, you will have a much better chance of finding them if they are microchipped and tagged. It is also important to maintain an up-to-date contact information list with phone numbers for the veterinarian, fire department, police station, animal shelter and the nearest relative or friend who could shelter your pet. “We may not always be together at home with our family and pets when disaster strikes, so we have to be prepared to communicate with and relocate our family and pets,” said TVMA Immediate Past President Sam Miller, DVM, of Village Veterinary Clinic in Houston. “In the event you are away from home, it would be a good idea for a neighbor or family member to have access to your house so they can assist in your disaster response.” About the Texas Veterinary Medical Association Founded in 1903, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association is a professional association composed of more than 3,700 veterinarians committed to protecting public health, promoting high educational, ethical and moral standards within the veterinary profession and educating the public about animal health and its relationship to human health. For more information, call 512/452-4224 or visit http://www.tvma.org. ###


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: phys.org

Avoid low-quality and contaminated pet food with information about recalls from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Veterinary Medical Association. Credit: Colorado State University Pet food recalls have made headlines in recent weeks, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that eight brands of cat, dog and rabbit food have been pulled from store shelves since the start of 2017. These foods have been recalled for containing possibly low levels of vitamin B1 and for carrying disease-causing bacteria, pieces of metal, and traces of the animal euthanasia agent pentobarbital. Pet owners may find information about recalled pet food by visiting the FDA website. More information about pet food adulterated with pentobarbital is available in this FDA news release. The American Veterinary Medical Association also provides information about pet food recalls and alerts on its website. Pet food recalls occur for many reasons. In general, the process exists to protect consumers from food that does not meet quality standards or is tainted with pathogens, excess or deficiency in vitamins or minerals, and contamination with toxins. Two recent pet food recalls have resulted from contamination with pentobarbital, a drug used in veterinary practice for humane euthanasia of sick or injured animals. Five dogs reportedly became ill after eating the food; one died, according to the FDA. Pentobarbital is not allowed in pet food, and adulterated food should not be legally sold. "t is not acceptable to use animals euthanized with a chemical substance in pet or animal foods," an FDA spokesperson told Food Safety News. The FDA, in coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is investigating the products that tested positive for pentobarbital to determine a possible cause for the drug's presence. The agency is focusing on suppliers of beef ingredients for pet food, it announced. How do you know if your pet's food is safe? It is important to choose food from companies that follow supply-chain regulations and enforce quality controls, including testing of products to detect problems before food reaches the marketplace. To know more about a manufacturer's quality control measures, contact the company directly. Manufacturers are expected to test both raw materials and finished products to ensure food safety. Many recent recalls have involved raw pet food and canned pet food. Canned food is cooked at high temperatures to ensure it is free from pathogens. However, this process may also lead to vitamin and amino acid degradation if not done properly or if these nutrients are not supplied in sufficient amounts. Raw pet food presents higher risk for pathogen contamination and foodborne illness. Several recent recalls have resulted from food contamination with the infectious bacteria Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Cooking food at high temperatures is the most effective way to eliminate pathogens, therefore raw pet food – including frozen, fresh and freeze-dried food – presents a higher risk for contamination. For this reason, the AVMA discourages raw diets for pets and provides more information in its policy on "Raw or Undercooked Animal-Source Protein in Cat and Dog Diets." If you are worried that your pet ate a contaminated food, contact your veterinarian or an emergency veterinary clinic.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TOPEKA, Kan., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. today announced its support of National Pet Dental Health Month. This special month is sponsored by the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), a non-profit veterinary organization, and is meant to raise awareness of the need for dental care in companion animals. Animal Clinic of North Topeka recognizes that dental care is needed to prevent pain and debilitation in pets and offers a full array of services to keep the animals' mouths healthy and free of problems. Just as with humans, dogs and cats can develop a full array of dental problems if care is not taken to prevent them. These include cavities, cracking and breaking of teeth, periodontal disease, and more. Even so, many people still think that animals don't need dental care. National Pet Dental Health Month was created to help dispel this myth and improve care among the pet population. "It's a common misconception that dogs and cats have teeth that take care of themselves. Domestic pets are in very different conditions than their wild counterparts. This is good for the animals in most ways – it provides a steady food supply, protection from predators, and treatment for disease – but it does have a couple of drawbacks. One of the drawbacks is that commercial pet food does not adequately remove tartar from the teeth," explained Dr. Bryan Stancliffe, DVM. Several measures are recommended for preserving the health of the teeth of dogs and cats. The first is the same as for humans: brushing the teeth. Since pets can't brush their own, owners should attempt to do it for them. If started young, the majority of pets will learn to tolerate this on a daily basis. Older animals, however, may refuse to go along with the procedure. For them, special tartar-fighting treats are available. Though these aren't quite as effective as a toothbrush, they are better than providing nothing at all. The next step is the dental cleaning. In pets, this requires general anesthesia, so it is done on an as-needed basis. A veterinarian will let the pet owner know when this is recommended. Professional cleanings are essential for preventing periodontal disease. If larger problems have arisen, tooth extraction may be needed. This is typically done instead of root canal treatment. It is also required if a tooth has cracked, broken, or otherwise developed problems that would cause pain to the pet. Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. offers teeth cleaning and extractions for pets. They also offer a full array of other veterinary services, parasite prevention, emergency appointments, boarding, and grooming. For more information on their services and hours, visit their website at http://animalclinicoftopeka.com/.


News Article | February 12, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Parents, beware: accidental poisoning from pet medicines is likely to happen among children when less attention is given to storing these seemingly harmless veterinary medications. The warning in your disinfectant and pesticide packaging to "Keep Out Of Reach Of Children," must be applied to pet medicines, too. Some 74.1 million households in the United States own at least one pet. There were at least 78 million dogs living in the household as pets back in 2012. And half of these households have children below 19. The results of a new study published in the journal Pediatrics revealed that accidental poisoning is high among children 19 years old or younger. Preventable poisonings among children accounted for more than 60,000 emergency cases and almost one million calls to poison centers; 48 percent of annual calls made to poison centers involved children below five years old. From 1999 to 2013, the Central Ohio Poison Center, for instance, recorded 1,431 cases of accidental poisoning among children. Eighty-seven percent of these calls involved children below five years old. Eighty-eight percent of the exposures were related to pet medicines for canine, whether they were through ingestion (94 percent) and ocular (2.1 percent) or skin contact (1.1 percent), with most of these cases happening at home. "It's much more common than we thought," COPC Director Henry Spiller, one of the authors of the study, said. The research indicated that these accidental poisonings had no serious medical effect. Parents are urged, however, to pay attention to storing medicines, including medicines for pets, carefully. At Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, parents are counselled on medication safety. These pet medicines may appear "yummy candy to kids," Dr. Tanya Altmann, founder of Calabasas Pediatrics, said. It is a must, she said, that these medicines are kept out of children's reach. She reminded parents that children are curious and eager to explore everything. The children might "accidentally get into something that they shouldn't," she added. To prevent accidental poisoning, parents must ensure that medicines are stored in child-resistant containers, and pet medicines must be stored separately from human medications. Dr. Michael Topper of the American Veterinary Medical Association advised pet owners when administering medicines to their pets. "If pet owners are unsure on how to give it, before they leave the vet, ask them to give lessons on how to give pills to your pet," Topper said. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

RICHMOND, Texas, Feb. 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- February is National Pet Dental Health Month. During this time, Kindred Care Pet Hospital is making an extra effort to raise awareness of good dental care for dogs and cats. Pet owners may not expect veterinarians to tell them that their dogs and cats have periodontal disease, yet, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats have at least the beginnings of gum disease by the time they are three years old. “Pet owners often joke about their cat or dog's bad breath,” Kindred Care Pet Hospital veterinarian Dr. Paul Fidelis says, “but often they don't realize that severe halitosis may be a sign of dental infection getting ready to spread to internal organs.” In addition to bad breath, other signs of pet periodontal disease include discolored teeth and gums, teeth that are chipped, cracked, loose or missing, swollen gums, and discomfort when eating. "Annual dental checkups are important," Dr. Paul Fidelis says. "We show pet owners obvious signs of trouble and explain what isn't so obvious, including tartar below the gum line that feeds bacteria." Tartar forms from plaque, a sticky, colorless film on teeth caused by the combination of mouth bacteria in saliva. An animal's body perceives the bacteria as an invader that the immune system needs to attack. The immune system sends white blood cells to battle the bacteria, which results in gum inflammation and loss of tissue and bone. Following a dental exam, Dr. Fidelis says, he tells pet owners whether cleaning and any corrective work is necessary, such as extractions. Pet dental procedures require anesthesia, he explains, because it makes the process safer and more comfortable for both pets and veterinarians. Dr. Fidelis suggests placing a little bit of flavored pet toothpaste (beef, chicken, and seafood, for example) on a finger and gently rubbing it up and down on a pet's teeth. "Do it daily for about a week and then try a soft pet toothbrush," Dr. Fidelis suggests. "Some tiny toothbrushes fit on a fingertip to make brushing easier." Kindred Care Pet Hospital is a full-service Richmond veterinary clinic. In addition to dental care, it provides wellness exams, vaccinations, spay and neuter operations, diagnostics including digital imaging, surgery, and emergency care. The clinic is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. For appointments, call (281) 265-0009 or visit their website at http://kindredcarepet.net/ for more information.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BEIJING & LIAOCHENG, CHINA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Global investment firm KKR has invested in Gambol Pet Group (the “Company” or “Gambol”), a leading provider of high-quality pet food headquartered in Shandong Province, China. Gambol and KKR are partnering to expand the Company’s production capacity in key markets including China, Thailand, countries in Europe, and the US, where it is currently the largest private-label provider of pet treats to Walmart. Gambol further aims to leverage KKR’s experience in food production and in implementing best practices in the area of food safety and security to provide even greater pet nutrition solutions to customers around the world. Qin Hua, Chairman & CEO of Gambol, said, “High quality pet food is critical to ensuring the health of pets. By partnering with KKR, we aim to expand and provide healthy packaged pet food to customers both overseas and in China. KKR will become a truly value-added partner to Gambol with their deep expertise in the global pet sector, with Chinese consumers, and in the area of food safety.” Gambol is one of the largest pet food exporters in China, supplying products to a broad customer base in Europe, Asia and North America. In its local market, the Company’s “Myfoodie” pet food brand holds the #1 ranking in China’s pet treat category and is a leader in the dry food category, according to China Feed Industry Association. The pet category is one of the fastest-growing consumer sectors in China with a compound annual growth rate of over 30% in the past few years, according to the data from Goumin.com. However, the market is still fragmented and under-developed, posing opportunities for players like Gambol with differentiation in technology and product quality. In addition, China’s pet food sector is still at a nascent stage compared to other markets. According to Stratop Group, only 13% of Chinese urban households have pet dogs. Meanwhile, more than 36% of American households own dogs, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. In China, packaged pet food penetration is only 14%, compared to more than 90% in the US. Chris Sun, Director at KKR China, said, “Gambol is well-positioned to capture new opportunities in the pet food sector globally and in China given Gambol’s extensive industry expertise, product innovation capabilities and long-term commitment to producing safe, high- -quality pet food. We look forward to working alongside this experienced and capable management team to build a true industry leader in the emerging pet market.” KKR makes its investment from its China Growth Fund. Further details of the transaction are not disclosed. Headquartered in Liaocheng, Shandong Province in China, Gambol is one of the largest pet food manufacturers in Asia with 6 facilities in China and 1 facility in Thailand. Gambol provides a wide range of pet food products including dry food, wet food, real meat jerky treats, rawhide chew, dental bone etc. Through stringent food safety control through supplier management, raw material test, processing control, finished product test and after-sales traceability, Gambol achieves highest industry quality standards and supplies to a broad customer base worldwide, including US and Canada Walmart. Gambol was the one of the largest pet food exporters in China in 2016. Gambol sells pet food product in the China market through its “Myfoodie” brand, through both online and traditional retail channels. Myfoodie ranked #1 in the pet treat category and top 10 in all pet related product categories. For additional information about Gambol, please visit Company website at www.gambolpet.com KKR is a leading global investment firm that manages investments across multiple asset classes including private equity, energy, infrastructure, real estate, credit and hedge funds. KKR aims to generate attractive investment returns by following a patient and disciplined investment approach, employing world‐class people, and driving growth and value creation at the asset level. KKR invests its own capital alongside its partners' capital and brings opportunities to others through its capital markets business. References to KKR's investments may include the activities of its sponsored funds. For additional information about KKR & Co. L.P. (NYSE:KKR), please visit KKR's website at www.kkr.com and on Twitter @KKR_Co.

Loading American Veterinary Medical Association collaborators
Loading American Veterinary Medical Association collaborators