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Indianapolis, IN, United States

Divyashree D.,Center for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education | Najafi M.,University of Texas at Arlington | Sever V.F.,American Structurepoint Inc. | Entezarmahdi A.,Center for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education
Pipelines 2015: Recent Advances in Underground Pipeline Engineering and Construction - Proceedings of the Pipelines 2015 Conference | Year: 2015

Large diameter water transmission pipelines are critical elements of water supply systems, because a failure can be catastrophic. Extended service interruptions for many customers, along with high costs of emergency repairs, inconveniences to general public, and associated water quality concerns can be results of large diameter pipeline failures. This paper presents a survey of water utilities for using large diameter (16 in. and larger diameter) high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes for water transmission applications as a part of a wider-scale research project on durability and reliability of HDPE pipes (Water Research Foundation (WaterRF) #4485). While a full evaluation of a particular pipe material requires many parameters to consider, the main goal of this paper is to present the overall experience of water utilities with large diameter HDPE pipes. The survey of water utilities indicated that majority of respondents were satisfied with the durability and reliability of large diameter HDPE pipe, while five percent were unsatisfied. Survey respondents expressed concerns about tapping, repairs and joints. They considered permeation and oxidation to be minor concerns with no failures reported due to oxidation or permeation in large diameter HDPE piping systems. They also mentioned that some measures are required to improve construction techniques. © 2015 ASCE. Source


Divyashree D.,University of Texas at Arlington | Najafi M.,University of Texas at Arlington | Sever V.F.,American Structurepoint Inc. | Entezarmahdi A.,University of Texas at Arlington
Pipelines 2015: Recent Advances in Underground Pipeline Engineering and Construction - Proceedings of the Pipelines 2015 Conference | Year: 2015

The drinking water infrastructure in the North America requires a durable and reliable water transmission pipe material. However, there is no known standard to evaluate large diameter high density polyethylene (HDPE) under cyclic loads to investigate its fatigue performance, as it a major concern for water utilities. As part of a wider-scale research project to investigate durability and reliability of large diameter HDPE pipe (Water Research Foundation (WaterRF) #4485), a testing protocol was developed at the Center for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education (CUIRE) at the University of Texas at Arlington to test a large diameter (16 in. and larger) HDPE pipe under cyclic surge pressures. This paper presents details of test setup, and results of testing for a 16-in., DR 17, 15-ft long pipe sample with a fusion joint in the middle. The testing consisted of two phases. The pressures used for the first phase were between 125 and 188 psi (1.5 times pressure class) for 2 million cycles. The 2 million cycles are equivalent to 50 pressure surges per day for a 100-year design life. A second phase was later added using the same pipe sample to evaluate occasional surges between 125 psi to 250 psi (two times pressure class) for 50,000 cycles. The testing was completed with pipe sample's minor dimensional changes primarily due to limited relaxation allowed during the pressure cycles. © 2015 ASCE. Source


McCormack J.C.,American Structurepoint Inc. | Boyles K.M.,West Bend
Pipelines 2015: Recent Advances in Underground Pipeline Engineering and Construction - Proceedings of the Pipelines 2015 Conference | Year: 2015

The City of South Bend's Consent Decree specifies capture and conveyance of overflows from all of their Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) locations, which was issued in 2012. The Long Term Control Plan (LTCP) in the Consent Decree, which was developed from 2002 to 2008, has a cost of almost $600 million. There are several retention treatment basins (RTB) and storage/conveyance pipes planned in the Long Term Control Plan (LTCP) as part of the Consent Decree. After the City of South Bend went through the first phase of their LTCP, they found that affordability was an issue. At the same time, the City was completing a feasibility study which ultimately included looking for options to reduce the cost of a specific area of the CSO program based on new technology. As a result of finding significant savings in that study and with the recent development of integrated planning, the City elected to contract a consultant to reevaluate their Consent decree LTCP. This paper describes the process for re-evaluating LTCPs through the use of new design technologies, integrated planning, and the value of advanced affordability calculation methods and how it is being applied to find the right answer for the City of South Bend. © 2015 ASCE. Source


Leising L.J.,American Structurepoint Inc.
Military Engineer | Year: 2010

The Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Engineering Service Center (ESC) in the US has drafted a proposal to implement strategies for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Existing Buildings (LEED-EB) rating system to Building 1100 at Naval Base Ventura County, California. The US Navy issued an Engineering & Construction Bulletin requiring that all projects be registered with the US Green Building Council (USGBC) and LEED submittal documentation certified by USGBC to meet the LEED Silver rating. An integrated project team was developed to collaborate on the Building 1100 project, which identified and capitalized on opportunities to make the building's processes more energy efficient. The project has led to significant benefits such as by reducing indoor and outdoor water use by more than 10,000-G a week, the Navy has saved $9,000 a year. The building's impact on the environment was reduced through simple methods and employee morale was improved by changes such as improving indoor air quality. Source


Urban D.C.,American Structurepoint Inc. | Grinstead J.W.,American Structurepoint Inc. | Vincent K.D.,City Engineers Office
Pipelines 2015: Recent Advances in Underground Pipeline Engineering and Construction - Proceedings of the Pipelines 2015 Conference | Year: 2015

Located in the City of Greenfield, Indiana, Potts Ditch is a partially encapsulated stream that was constructed over a century ago. The encapsulated infrastructure is constructed mostly of brick arches and is reaching the end of its useful life. Portions of the encapsulated infrastructure are located underneath and adjacent to existing buildings, thereby putting these structures at risk. Furthermore, the ditch is undersized and contributes to flooding in the downtown area. The project, currently under construction, includes installation of approximately 2,000 linear feet (LFT) of new 14-foot by 6-foot precast concrete box sections to reroute Potts Ditch within the City right-of-way. The stream was modeled in HEC-RAS. Design included a detailed sequence of construction to install the proposed facilities while maintaining existing operations, minimizing the need for bypass pumping, and minimizing the impact to the affected neighborhoods. The affected street corridors are being completely rebuilt and utilities are being relocated to accommodate the construction. Due to vertical conflicts between the existing gravity sewers and the precast concrete box, the City decided to proceed with a 24-inch sanitary sewer interceptor project through the project area to maintain gravity sewer service. Subsurface Utility Engineering Quality Level A was completed in strategic locations. At project completion, the City will have improved storm drainage, filled in a brick arch that is at the end of its useful life, extended a sanitary sewer interceptor, and reconstructed street corridors within the project area. © 2015 ASCE. Source

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