Reston, VA, United States
Reston, VA, United States

The American Society of Civil Engineers is a tax-exempt professional body founded in 1852 to represent members of the civil engineering profession worldwide. Based in Reston, Virginia, it is the oldest national engineering society in the United States. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

FEDERAL WAY, WA, May 12, 2017-- Thomas E. Gates has featured in numerous editions of Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Mr. Gates parlays his knowledge into his roles as a civil engineer, researcher, waste management administrator and lawyer. He has served the people of his community not only in law, but served politically for two terms on the City Council and Mayor for the City of Richland. He is dedicated to serving the people of Washington State, and was the King County Bar Association's Volunteer Legal Services Attorney of the Year in 2004. He has repeatedly been identified as a Rising Star by Washington Super Lawyers. He started his career by serving as a state inspector, field supervisor and consultant for Riley County Public Works, after which he earned a Bachelor of Science from Kansas State University. His degree propelled him to join his alma mater as a graduate research assistant for two years before he earned a Master of Science from the institution. Backed by a strong educational foundation, Mr. Gates began working for Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories as an engineer, research engineer and senior research engineer between 1981 and 1986. He then joined BWIP for two years, Westinghouse Hanford Co. for five years, Sonalysts for three years, and PLG, Inc., for a year. After garnering experience in a number of different roles, he furthered his knowledge by earning a JD from Seattle University in 2001. He opened his practice, Gates Law PLLC, in 2004. His areas of expertise are in estate planning and probate, personal injury, and small business. In 2014, he was nationally ranked among the Top 10 Under 40 Attorneys by the National Academy of Criminal Defense Attorneys and he holds a Preeminent 5.0 out of 5.0 Martindale-Hubbell rating. In 2015, he was the recipient of the Excellence in Legal Services Award from the U.S. Commerce & Trade Research Institute.Mr. Gates is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Concrete Institute, the King County Bar Association, and the Knights of Columbus. Throughout his career, he has contributed his extensive knowledge into seven different articles and 14 technical reports. In recognition of his efforts, he was named Outstanding Young Man of America in 1978, and was named one of Washington's Rising Stars through Super Lawyers. Additionally, he has been named to Who's Who of Emerging Leaders in America once, Who's Who in Science and Engineering eight times, and Who's Who in America 14 times. Looking forward, Mr. Gates intends to experience the continued growth and success of his career.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Infrastructure! We’ve really got your attention now, right? Here’s the thing, though: It’s what makes modern life possible. Showers, cellphones, pizza delivery, toilets — all those fail without infrastructure. Much of what we’ve got now is old, dangerous, and needs replacement, and voters of both political parties agree on the need to do something about it. (That last statement in itself should be shocking enough to keep you reading.) So President Trump, seeking an issue slightly less divisive that yanking health care away from millions of people, has promised to present a $1 trillion spending proposal to Congress sometime in the next three weeks, claiming it will “completely fix America’s infrastructure.” Never mind that the American Society of Civil Engineers has said we need to spend $3.6 trillion by 2020 — they’ve obviously never seen Trump make deals. The question is, where to start? Although Republicans and Democrats are united on the need to fix the nation’s roads, bridges, airports, and sewer drains, they largely disagree on how to spend the money — a split that’s largely rural-urban in nature, with Rs preferring highways and Ds preferring public transit, for starters. As with his border wall, Trump has suggested he’ll get someone else to pay for the rebuilding effort — the builders themselves, who would be compensated in the form of tax write-offs and user fees. We talked to a lot of experts over the past few weeks, from both ends of the political spectrum, about where the money for infrastructure should go and how to pay for it. Just about all of them panned Trump’s ideas. “When we look at our infrastructure investments, for the most part, they all lose money,” says Chuck Marohn, founder of the nonprofit Strong Towns. “So I’m deeply skeptical that, without financial shenanigans, there are any good investments out there for a business.” What would get built under Trump’s let-it-pay-for-itself plan? A bunch of toll plazas, basically, Marohn says. So, instead of asking what will happen under Trump’s infrastructure proposal (sigh), we asked the wide range of experts we talked to what should happen. What would they do with $1 trillion to spend on the country’s corroded pipes, crumbling bridges, and iffy transit systems? Here are their wishlists, as told to Grist. Lynn Richards, president and CEO, Congress for New Urbanism When you look at infrastructure needs in the United States, we’re trillions and trillions behind where we need to be. We can’t afford to spend our money on infrastructure that just meets one objective. So my budget focuses on projects that fulfill multiple needs. Expanding biking infrastructure, green streets, and parks gives you a good return on investment and improves mobility and public health. Let’s start with the smallest part of the budget: biking infrastructure. I bike from Georgetown to our office in DuPont Circle and often take up a whole car lane going 20 miles an hour max. Give bikers like me a protected lane, and you will not only make it easier for people to bike, but ease congestion. People want mobility in the most efficient manner possible. But we make it so difficult to take transit, bike, and walk that of course people drive. It becomes the easiest way. So many cities need more transit but aren’t ready for light rail. Let’s meet communities where they are. For some the answer is BRT, bus rapid transit. It looks and operates just like a rail system, but it’s cheaper and more flexible. Hartford, Connecticut, has been putting in miles and miles of BRT lines. High-speed rail is an investment for the future even though we need it right now. It’s a seven-hour drive from Washington, D.C., to Boston and an eight-to-10-hour train ride. That should be a trip you can make on high-speed rail. Let’s link other major metropolitan areas, like New Orleans to Houston. We need to give people a wide range of transportation options. There are freeways around the country that split neighborhoods and separate cities from the water, like the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle, or I-81 in Syracuse. Many of these are nearing the end of their life. So instead of paying to repair them, take them down and create boulevards. The Embarcadero Freeway in San Francisco came down, and look at the boulevard now. Let’s build parks in economically disadvantaged communities. We know from research that parks have a great economic impact, leaving aside the public health benefits. Infrastructure is more than just sewer and roads. It’s about the very foundation of our communities. The most important principle of a federal infrastructure bill should be a maniacal focus on maintenance. Politicians always prefer cutting ribbons on new things to maintaining something that already exists. We put a large percentage into new roads and new transit systems when our old ones are falling apart. That doesn’t make a lot of sense. I don’t favor building more highways. That’s not a national economic driver the way the original interstate highways system was back in the ’50s. A lot of people think we can build our way to prosperity. Look at China, people say. Well, China didn’t have infrastructure before. To the extent that we need to spend on roads, there could be a stimulus-style, one-time grant program for roadways designed specifically to repair crumbling local streets and structurally deficient bridges. Local streets are where people live, and so many of them are in bad shape, but for the most part they’re not eligible for federal aid. Toledo, Ohio, estimates that it has $1.3 billion in needed repairs. Is Toledo better off with moonscape streets? I’m not interested in reducing transit funding. But a lot of money goes to dubious projects in cities that aren’t a great fit: They don’t have the density, the big downtowns; $3.3 billion for the Durham-Orange light rail project in North Carolina makes no sense. The money should go where there’s established transit — San Francisco, Chicago, New York City; otherwise, you risk losing ridership. The metro in Washington, D.C., is losing ridership because it’s breaking down all the time. The federal government used to have a grantmaking program for water and sewer retrofits, but it was eliminated long ago. The post-industrial cities Trump championed are precisely the places where much of the nation’s obsolete water and sewer infrastructure is located. The federal government is telling them to make repairs. Cleveland, for instance, is spending $2.7 billion to retrofit its sewers for Clean Water Act compliance. That’s the most expensive capital project in the region. People in struggling post-industrial cities are taxing themselves to pay for necessary repairs. And many of these people are poor. If the public is going to spend money, it must lead to good outcomes for the public. That hasn’t always been the case. When we are thinking about some of the shovel-ready projects, we need to ask: Have we truly thought about the next generation of people that they will serve? Some of these plans have been on the books for decades. After all that time, do those plans still align with what that community looks like right now, and what is coming up? We are literally living on what is 1960s infrastructure — it qualifies for AARP! When it was built, this was a different world. There weren’t civil rights laws in place, and infrastructure often reinforced inequities. Today, even as we talk about those inequities, we are, for example, reinforcing some of those highways that divided communities and continue to exacerbate the divide we see in America. The majority of money should go to local communities — as local as possible. You can go to any city, any bar, and you can find someone who knows what needs to be fixed. When the money goes lower down — rather than stopping at the state governor’s level — it allows communities to ask for what they really need. I’d say 25 to 35 percent should go to the state level for fully funding programs we know work well: Making sure state revolving funds for clean water and drinking water are fully funded. That will alleviate situations like what’s happening in Flint. We still need some money at the federal level. Small communities know what they need, but they also need technical assistance — staff support and oversight — like the support that the EPA provides to communities that want to clean up brownfields. In all of this, instead of using outdated building materials, use cleaner and greener materials. It may cost more upfront, but the benefits last longer and outweigh the costs over time. Yonah Freemark, founder of The Transport Politic and PhD student at MIT Over the past 30 years, American cities have spent billions on the expansion of their transit systems. Of the 30 largest U.S. metropolitan areas, 27 have some sort of urban rail network in operation — but in 1989, only 14 did. We’ve collectively spent huge amounts of money making transit systems larger. And yet the share of commuters using transit to get to work is the same nationwide now as it was in 1990 — and the share of people walking or carpooling to work has declined considerably. What gives? Fundamentally, we’re bad at using the transit we have. Per-mile ridership on recent American light rail lines in mid-sized cities, for example, is typically a third of that on similar French tramways. At the heart of the problem is that the land uses around our transit stations are typically at a very low density, and driving is encouraged through required-parking provisions. What’s made the problem worse is the fact that we’ve spent even more expanding the freeway network. In the end, we’ve thrown a ton of money at our transportation system to make it less environmentally friendly. If we’re going to spend a trillion dollars, let’s focus on intensifying land uses around existing transportation infrastructure, not expanding it. Cities around the country are suffering from a tremendous housing affordability crisis for working and middle-class households — why not find ways both to reduce their housing and transportation costs? Rather than investing in new transit or highways, let’s provide cities with grants to support a massive boom in housing for low- and middle-income families around transit stations. Let’s encourage little downtowns of high-rise, mixed-use, green buildings. Not only will this investment produce more affordable housing, but it will make our transit systems more effective and get more people out of their cars. Charles Marohn, founder and president of the nonprofit Strong Towns Right now we have this huge maintenance backlog. We have this stuff rotting in the sun. Are we going to let it rot while we build a bunch more? That’s just reckless. We’ve built an entire economy around large-scale infrastructure that ends up costing cities. So first you put in a road and a frontage road, and sewer and water, and what you get is a Walmart and a Costco and a housing development. The problem is that then we have a bunch of infrastructure to maintain, and that often costs more than the tax revenue that comes in from those new buildings. It’s not viable. We’ve been building infrastructure this way for two generations, and it’s slowly bankrupting our cities, towns, and neighborhoods. Instead of building new things, we need maintenance, mostly in older, poorer neighborhoods and mostly below ground. Many of our sewer and water systems are approaching 100 years old. When these core pipes fail, the problems cascade throughout the system. The neighborhoods that have the highest tax return per acre today — and where a little bit of investment could have a big payoff — are the places with the highest poverty. So you look at those neighborhoods, and what do they need? They need just a little bit of love. Patch the sidewalks. Repave the streets. Fix the pipes. They also need new infrastructure. I’d put about 5 percent into what I would call neighborhood venture capital: Small, experimental projects: Put in some street trees. Put in a crosswalk. Connect to commercial centers. I think the modern environmentalist needs to be a pro-city person, but our pattern of infrastructure investment hurts cities. It induces people to spend their money inefficiently, by getting on the freeway to go to Walmart rather than walking to a store across the street. The more we can invest in making cities viable places — places where people want to live, places that can take care of themselves — the more cities will serve the aims of environmentalists.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.sej.org

"After two weeks that saw evacuations near Oroville, Calif., and flooding in Elko County, Nev., America’s dams are showing their age. Nearly 2,000 state-regulated high-hazard dams in the United States were listed as being in need of repair in 2015, according to the Association of State Dam Safety Officials. A dam is considered 'high hazard' based on the potential for the loss of life as a result of failure. By 2020, 70 percent of the dams in the United States will be more than 50 years old, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers." Roy Griggs, Gregor Aisch, and Sarah Almukhtar report for the New York Times February 23, 2017.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--California and Hawaii American Water have named Richard Svindland their new president, effective March 1, 2017. Svindland replaces Robert MacLean, who has served as president of California American Water since 2009. MacLean will now become senior vice president of American Water’s Eastern Division, which is comprised of New Jersey, New York, Virginia and Maryland. MacLean also will serve as president of New Jersey American Water. “We are so pleased to promote both Rob and Rich. It is well-deserved,” said Walter Lynch, chief operating officer at American Water. “I know Rich will take over where Rob left off, ensuring our customers in California and Hawaii receive the best service possible, while continuing to focus on the successful completion of the Monterey Peninsula water supply project. His deep utility experience makes him well-suited for this new role.” Svindland has more than 25 years of experience in the water and wastewater fields, most recently serving as California American Water’s vice president of operations. Prior to that role, he led Engineering at California American Water, where he managed all of the company's capital projects to ensure timely and cost-efficient delivery. He also developed capital planning strategies and provided an operational review of existing infrastructure to ensure California American Water’s systems met both the current and future water needs. Prior to his roles in California, Svindland worked extensively in American Water's southeast region on various projects and was named 2003 Civil Engineer of the Year in Industry by the Kentucky section of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a master's degree in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky. California American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to more than 660,000 people. Hawaii American Water provides quality wastewater services to approximately 28,000 people. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,700 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A new automated system detects cracks in the steel components of nuclear power plants and has been shown to be more accurate than other automated systems. "Periodic inspection of the components of nuclear power plants is important to avoid accidents and ensure safe operation," said Mohammad R. Jahanshahi, an assistant professor in Purdue University's Lyles School of Civil Engineering. "However, current inspection practices are time consuming, tedious and subjective because they involve an operator manually locating cracks in metallic surfaces." Other automatic crack detection algorithms under development often do not detect cracks in metallic surfaces because the cracks are usually small, have low contrast and are difficult to distinguish from welds, scratches and grind marks. The new system, called CRAQ, for crack recognition and quantification, overcomes this limitation by using an advanced algorithm and a powerful "machine learning" technique to detect cracks based on the changing texture surrounding cracks on steel surfaces. Findings are detailed in a research paper published this week in Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering. The automated approach could help improve the state of the nation's infrastructure, recently given an overall grade of D+ by the American Society of Civil Engineers, he said. "One reason we have a grade of D+ for the infrastructure is insufficient inspection," said Jahanshahi, director of Purdue's Smart Informatix Laboratory. "So we want to have more frequent inspection using robotic systems to collect data." The nation operates 99 commercial nuclear power plants, which account for about 20 percent of total U.S. electricity generation. Aging can result in cracking, fatigue, embrittlement of metal components, wear, erosion, corrosion and oxidation. "Cracking is an important factor in aging degradation that may cause leaking and result in hazardous incidents," Jahanshahi said. "For instance, the Millstone nuclear power station in Connecticut had an accident in 1996 that was caused by a leaking valve, and the accident cost $254 million. In 2010, the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant had an accident where deteriorating underground pipes leaked radioactive tritium into groundwater supplies, resulting in $700 million in damage." "Consequently, direct manual inspection of reactor internals is not feasible due to high temperatures and radiation hazards," Jahanshahi said. "So remotely recorded videos at the underwater reactor surface are used for inspection. However, recent testing has identified a need for increased reliability associated with identifying cracks from reviews of live and recorded data. The results indicate that this capability is degraded by human involvement in identifying cracks, even when identification should be easy." Other automated crack-detection systems under development are designed for processing single images, whereas the new method processes multiple video frames, providing more robust results. Findings show the system outperformed two others under development. "In contrast to other methods that only focus on detecting cracks in one image, we propose a method called Bayesian data fusion that tracks detected cracks in video frames and fuses the information obtained from multiple frames," Jahanshahi said. "Moreover, we can filter out falsely detected cracks and increase the reliability and robustness of crack detection by using Bayesian decision theory," which determines the probability that an object is a crack or a false alarm. The system assigns "confidence levels" automatically assessing whether the detected cracks are real, outlining the cracks with color-coded boxes that correspond to these confidence levels. For example, if the algorithm assigns a high confidence level to a crack, the box outline is red. The processing procedure takes about a minute. "Then, a technician could do a manual inspection to confirm that there is a crack," Jahanshahi said. Researchers recorded videos using an underwater camera system scanning 304 stainless steel specimens containing cracks and also features such as welds, grinding marks and scratches. Future research will include work to develop a more accurate and more fully automated system using advanced simulations and computational software. "We are currently working on the second version of the software by developing deep learning algorithms to detect cracks for this application where we have significantly improved the performance of the system using Constitutional Neural Networks," Jahanshahi said. The researchers have filed a patent application through the Office of Technology Commercialization of the Purdue Research Foundation.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation celebrates the problem solvers who dream big and make a difference during National Engineers Week, February 17 -25. The week’s activities include special guest speakers, demonstrations from Kettering University and the University of Michigan, the early release of the new film – “Dream Big: Engineering Our World” inside the Giant Screen Experience and hands-on activities for all ages. Starting February 17, the Giant Screen Experience will give movie-goers the chance to see “Dream Big: Engineering Our World” before its official release nationwide on Feb. 22. Produced in partnership with the American Society of Civil Engineers and narrated by Academy Award® winner Jeff Bridges, “Dream Big” celebrates human ingenuity and innovation while offering an exciting new perspective on what it means to be an engineer. As part of the early release, the Comerica Charitable Foundation will be hosting a special preview for local students on February 17 and on February 18 former astronaut Dean Tony England will introduce a screening of the film at 11:10 am. On February 24, the museum will host Robert Scott, Director of the Center for Engineering Diversity & Outreach from the University of Michigan College of Engineering for a talk on STEM careers for everyone at 10 am in the museum plaza. GE Digital and MDOT will also be onsite throughout the day to discuss careers in the STEM field. Hands-on activities and demonstrations will take place throughout the week including special offerings from University of Michigan - Dearborn and Kettering University on February 17-18 and pop-up science demonstrations from The Henry Ford’s Learning and Engagement team February 20-23 from 10 am – 12 pm in the museum plaza. On Saturday February 25 as part of the museum’s Make Something Saturdays program, younger visitors will have the chance to participate in the Hack4Kidz technology destruction zone and lock picking demonstrations. For more information on the week’s schedule visit http://www.thehenryford.org. About The Henry Ford The Henry Ford in Dearborn, Michigan is an internationally-recognized history destination that explores the American experience of innovation, resourcefulness and ingenuity that helped shape America. A national historic landmark with an unparalleled Archive of American Innovation, The Henry Ford is a force for sparking curiosity and inspiring tomorrow’s innovators. Nearly 1.8 million visitors annually experience its five attractions: Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation, Greenfield Village, Ford Rouge Factory Tour, Benson Ford Research Center and The Henry Ford Giant Screen Experience. A continually expanding array of content available online provides anytime, anywhere access. The Henry Ford is also home to Henry Ford Academy, a public charter high school which educates over 500 students a year on the institution’s campus. In 2014, The Henry Ford premiered its first-ever national television series, The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation, showcasing present-day change-makers and The Henry Ford’s artifacts and unique visitor experiences. Hosted by news correspondent and humorist, Mo Rocca, this Emmy®-winning weekly half-hour show airs Saturday mornings on CBS. For more information please visit our website thehenryford.org.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DAVENPORT, Iowa--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Following a 10-month review, the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) today issued an order adjusting rates for Iowa American Water. Iowa American Water’s investment of approximately $38 million in water system improvements is the primary driver behind the rate change request. In its final rate order, the IUB approved an overall increase in additional annual revenue of $3.9 million or 10.37 percent. This final order amount includes the previous temporary rate increase of $2.1 million that was implemented by Iowa American Water on May 9, 2016 as allowed by Iowa Code § 476.6(9). Company officials say those additional revenues will help Iowa American Water continue to invest proactively in its water infrastructure throughout the state. Iowa American Water last received a rate change order from the IUB in 2014. “ Reliable water service is essential to everyday life and a community’s strong economy, and proactive water system upgrades today save money in the long run,” said Randy Moore, president of Iowa American Water. “ All these investments in local water infrastructure systems enhance water quality, service reliability and fire protection for customers while keeping the cost of water service for most local households at about a penny per gallon.” The need to upgrade water systems is a national challenge. In 2013, the American Society of Civil Engineers said that an estimated $1 trillion in capital spending would be needed across the nation over 25 years to replace thousands of miles of pipe, upgrade treatment plants and comply with stricter water quality standards. Iowa American Water is addressing this challenge. Iowa American Water’s rates are based on the costs of providing water service as reviewed and approved by the IUB. Moore added that Iowa American Water has worked to control costs, reducing operating expenses by about 10 percent or $1.7 million since the last rate order. The next step in the process will be for Iowa American Water to prepare and file a rate design for approval by the IUB that breaks down the allowed increase between the company’s various customer classifications. An effective date for the new rates will be established once the IUB approves the company’s rate design. On April 29, 2016, Iowa American Water filed a proposal with the IUB requesting to increase its annual revenue by $5.15 million. Effective May 9, 2016, Iowa American Water implemented an interim rate increase as part of its rate increase application as allowed under state regulations. The interim increase allowed Iowa American to begin collecting a portion of its rate increase while the IUB and Office of Consumer Advocate (“OCA”) reviewed the full filing. The interim rates generated about $2.1 million in additional annual revenue and represent a $2.33 per month increase for the average residential customer. “ As a utility whose services are critical to ensuring public health, we take our responsibility to provide quality drinking water seriously, and as such, are committed to keeping our systems and facilities well maintained,” added Moore. Customers needing assistance paying their water bills can contact Community Action of Eastern Iowa to apply for help from Iowa American Water’s Project H2O “Help to Others” program. Community Action of Eastern Iowa administers this program, and customers needing assistance are urged to contact their local office in either Clinton or Davenport. Customers can contact American Water's Call Service Center toll free at 1-866-641-2108 with additional questions. Additional information can also be found on the Iowa Utilities Board’s website at www.state.ia.us/iub/. Iowa American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water services to approximately 212,000 people. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly-traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,700 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MERRICK, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--New York American Water announced today it has named Carmen Tierno its new president, effective March 1, 2017. Tierno replaces Brian Bruce, who has been named president of West Virginia American Water. “We are so pleased to see both Brian and Carmen take on new expanded roles at American Water,” said American Water’s chief operating officer Walter Lynch. “We thank Brian for his leadership in New York and are excited for Carmen to join the New York team. Carmen has been a great asset to New Jersey American Water in a variety of roles and has been a key contributor in improving service to our customers in that state. I know his experience in all aspects of the water industry and his commitment to customer service excellence will suit him well in this new role.” Tierno currently serves as New Jersey American Water’s senior director of the company’s Southwest district operations. Tierno has more than 25 years of experience in the water industry and has been with New Jersey American Water for 20 years in various capacities. As senior director, Tierno is responsible for safety, transmission and distribution, field customer service, meter reading, and the overall performance of New Jersey American Water operations in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, and Salem counties. Previously, Tierno worked for the Philadelphia Water Department and then joined New Jersey American Water as an operations engineer. He also served as an engineering manager and as director of customer relations and director of business performance. Tierno earned his MBA from Rutgers University and his Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from Widener University. He has been active with the Water for People charity for more than 15 years and visited Honduras to review water and sanitation projects. Tierno is a member of the American Water Works Association and American Society of Civil Engineers. New York American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water company in New York, providing high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 350,000 people. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,800 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.


RYE, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Gabelli & Company is pleased to announce that Mark W. Woodson, P.E., L.S., D.WRE, F.ASCE, the 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers President, will deliver a keynote address on America’s critical infrastructure spending needs at its 27th Annual Pump, Valve & Water Systems Symposium on March 1 in New York City. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) represents more than 150,000 members of the civil engineering profession in 177 countries. Founded in 1852, ASCE is the nation’s oldest engineering society. ASCE stands at the forefront of a profession that plans, designs, constructs, and operates society’s economic and social engine – the built environment – while protecting and restoring the natural environment. Mr. Woodson’s keynote will cover the facts behind the Report Card for America’s Infrastructure (infrastructurereportcard.org). The Report Card gave a GPA of “D+” to the nation’s infrastructure in 2013. The next Report Card will be released on March 9, 2017. Mr. Woodson will address the economic case for America’s infrastructure and the solutions that can close our infrastructure competitiveness gap compared to other nations. Mr. Woodson received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering in 1979 and an MBA in 1985 from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Mark is a licensed civil engineer and surveyor in California and Arizona. In 1994, Mr. Woodson received the Arizona Civil Engineer Distinguished Service award from the Arizona Section of ASCE. In 2002, he was awarded the John C. Park Outstanding Engineering award by the Arizona Section of ASCE. In 2002, he was elected as a Fellow in the American Society of Civil Engineers. In 2013 he became a Diplomate of Water Resources Engineering. In 2014, Mr. Woodson was elected to become the 2016 ASCE President. Institutional investors should contact their Gabelli & Company sales representative to register.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Nanotechnology - What You Should Know Graphene - Here's What You Should Know It is common knowledge that accidents in nuclear power plants lead to hazardous consequences with long-term implications. Examples include the Chernobyl catastrophe in Russia. One of the reasons for accidents is the failure to detect the cracks on components well in advance. Routine inspections may not be able to identify the cracks and they evade detection because the inspection methods may not keep pace with an aging plant's structural problems. Thanks to a new automated system developed at Purdue University, the steel components of nuclear power plants can be examined more accurately compared to other existing systems. This was revealed in a study published in the Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering journal. The paper was authored by Fu-Chen Chen, a doctoral student. As nuclear plants age, they face problems of fatigue, wear and tear, erosion, embrittlement of metal components, corrosion, and oxidation. This calls for a stepped-up periodic foolproof inspection to ward off any future calamities. "Periodic inspection of the components of nuclear power plants is important to avoid accidents and ensure safe operation," noted Mohammad R. Jahanshahi, an assistant professor at Purdue University's Lyles School of Civil Engineering and the paper's co-author. According to the expert, the current inspection methods have many defects, including lack of objectivity that takes away a lot of time and the faults of operators who try to manually locate cracks in metallic surfaces. The new automated system called CRAQ uses advanced algorithms and machine learning to detect cracks on the basis of changes in the texture that appear on steel surfaces. Detecting cracks in metallic surfaces is a challenge because many of the automatic crack detection algorithms cannot trace them as they are too tiny and hard to distinguish from welds, scratches, and grind marks. At the moment, remotely recorded videos are used for inspection. The complexity of the inspection process of nuclear plants is aggravated by the fact that nuclear reactors are submerged in water for cooling purposes. "Consequently, direct manual inspection of reactor internals is not feasible due to high temperatures and radiation hazards," Jahanshahi said. He noted that cracking-led degradation would lead to hazardous accidents and huge financial costs. "For instance, the Millstone nuclear power station in Connecticut had an accident in 1996 that was caused by a leaking valve, and the accident cost $254 million," the co-author added. According to the researchers, greater reliability needs to be maintained in accepting the results of videos taken during inspection because they are recorded at the underwater reactor surface with scope for many imperfections. The Purdue researchers, in evolving their new system, used videos taken by an underwater camera system and scanned more than 300 stainless steel specimens that had cracks, grinding marks, scratches, and weld marks. Their analysis went beyond the conventional single-image processing as they used multiple video frames to arrive at the best results. The new system showed itself as superior to many other systems. In the new method, the cracks have been identified by a method called "Bayesian data fusion," which tracks cracks via video frames from the information coming from multiple frames. Certainly, the new system will benefit the American nuclear plants, which recently received an overall D+ rating by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Meanwhile, Toshiba's decision to quit the business of nuclear power plants has hit the sector, as innovation and research on reactor designs will be a casualty. A majority stake in Westinghouse Electric by the Japanese conglomerate had raised hopes that new generation power plants that are safer, smaller, cheaper will be in the offing. However, rising cost overruns, technical problems, and regulatory challenges in many projects led to Toshiba announcing a $6.3 billion write-down in the nuclear business and a planned offloading of its stake in the company. "It looked like a big deal at the time, but it's turned into a mess," said Michael Golay, a professor at MIT. The retreat of Toshiba comes when the International Energy Agency estimated that nuclear energy capacity would need to double by 2050 to prevent worldwide temperatures from increasing more than 2 degrees Celsius. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Loading American Society of Civil Engineers collaborators
Loading American Society of Civil Engineers collaborators