Reston, VA, United States
Reston, VA, United States

The American Society of Civil Engineers is a tax-exempt professional body founded in 1852 to represent members of the civil engineering profession worldwide. Based in Reston, Virginia, it is the oldest national engineering society in the United States. Wikipedia.


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News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.sej.org

"After two weeks that saw evacuations near Oroville, Calif., and flooding in Elko County, Nev., America’s dams are showing their age. Nearly 2,000 state-regulated high-hazard dams in the United States were listed as being in need of repair in 2015, according to the Association of State Dam Safety Officials. A dam is considered 'high hazard' based on the potential for the loss of life as a result of failure. By 2020, 70 percent of the dams in the United States will be more than 50 years old, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers." Roy Griggs, Gregor Aisch, and Sarah Almukhtar report for the New York Times February 23, 2017.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--California and Hawaii American Water have named Richard Svindland their new president, effective March 1, 2017. Svindland replaces Robert MacLean, who has served as president of California American Water since 2009. MacLean will now become senior vice president of American Water’s Eastern Division, which is comprised of New Jersey, New York, Virginia and Maryland. MacLean also will serve as president of New Jersey American Water. “We are so pleased to promote both Rob and Rich. It is well-deserved,” said Walter Lynch, chief operating officer at American Water. “I know Rich will take over where Rob left off, ensuring our customers in California and Hawaii receive the best service possible, while continuing to focus on the successful completion of the Monterey Peninsula water supply project. His deep utility experience makes him well-suited for this new role.” Svindland has more than 25 years of experience in the water and wastewater fields, most recently serving as California American Water’s vice president of operations. Prior to that role, he led Engineering at California American Water, where he managed all of the company's capital projects to ensure timely and cost-efficient delivery. He also developed capital planning strategies and provided an operational review of existing infrastructure to ensure California American Water’s systems met both the current and future water needs. Prior to his roles in California, Svindland worked extensively in American Water's southeast region on various projects and was named 2003 Civil Engineer of the Year in Industry by the Kentucky section of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a master's degree in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky. California American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to more than 660,000 people. Hawaii American Water provides quality wastewater services to approximately 28,000 people. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,700 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.sej.org

"As the nation's 84,000 dams continue to age, a growing number of people downstream are at risk, experts say. That's not only because of older infrastructure but also because of population growth around some of the dams. More than a quarter were developed primarily for recreational purposes, according to National Inventory of Dams data from 2016. 'The nation’s dams are aging, and the number of high-hazard dams is on the rise,' according to a 2013 report from the American Society of Civil Engineers. 'Many of these dams were built as low-hazard dams protecting undeveloped agricultural land. However, with an increasing population and greater development below dams, the overall number of high-hazard dams continues to increase.'" "After Oroville, Attention Turns To New York Dam Safety" (Lower Hudson Journal News) "How Safe Are Dams In New Mexico?" (KFOX-14) "California Dam Crisis: Could It Happen In Massachusetts?" (WCVB) "If Oroville Dam Failed, Residents Likely Would Not Be Advised In Time" (AP)


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation celebrates the problem solvers who dream big and make a difference during National Engineers Week, February 17 -25. The week’s activities include special guest speakers, demonstrations from Kettering University and the University of Michigan, the early release of the new film – “Dream Big: Engineering Our World” inside the Giant Screen Experience and hands-on activities for all ages. Starting February 17, the Giant Screen Experience will give movie-goers the chance to see “Dream Big: Engineering Our World” before its official release nationwide on Feb. 22. Produced in partnership with the American Society of Civil Engineers and narrated by Academy Award® winner Jeff Bridges, “Dream Big” celebrates human ingenuity and innovation while offering an exciting new perspective on what it means to be an engineer. As part of the early release, the Comerica Charitable Foundation will be hosting a special preview for local students on February 17 and on February 18 former astronaut Dean Tony England will introduce a screening of the film at 11:10 am. On February 24, the museum will host Robert Scott, Director of the Center for Engineering Diversity & Outreach from the University of Michigan College of Engineering for a talk on STEM careers for everyone at 10 am in the museum plaza. GE Digital and MDOT will also be onsite throughout the day to discuss careers in the STEM field. Hands-on activities and demonstrations will take place throughout the week including special offerings from University of Michigan - Dearborn and Kettering University on February 17-18 and pop-up science demonstrations from The Henry Ford’s Learning and Engagement team February 20-23 from 10 am – 12 pm in the museum plaza. On Saturday February 25 as part of the museum’s Make Something Saturdays program, younger visitors will have the chance to participate in the Hack4Kidz technology destruction zone and lock picking demonstrations. For more information on the week’s schedule visit http://www.thehenryford.org. About The Henry Ford The Henry Ford in Dearborn, Michigan is an internationally-recognized history destination that explores the American experience of innovation, resourcefulness and ingenuity that helped shape America. A national historic landmark with an unparalleled Archive of American Innovation, The Henry Ford is a force for sparking curiosity and inspiring tomorrow’s innovators. Nearly 1.8 million visitors annually experience its five attractions: Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation, Greenfield Village, Ford Rouge Factory Tour, Benson Ford Research Center and The Henry Ford Giant Screen Experience. A continually expanding array of content available online provides anytime, anywhere access. The Henry Ford is also home to Henry Ford Academy, a public charter high school which educates over 500 students a year on the institution’s campus. In 2014, The Henry Ford premiered its first-ever national television series, The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation, showcasing present-day change-makers and The Henry Ford’s artifacts and unique visitor experiences. Hosted by news correspondent and humorist, Mo Rocca, this Emmy®-winning weekly half-hour show airs Saturday mornings on CBS. For more information please visit our website thehenryford.org.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A new automated system detects cracks in the steel components of nuclear power plants and has been shown to be more accurate than other automated systems. "Periodic inspection of the components of nuclear power plants is important to avoid accidents and ensure safe operation," said Mohammad R. Jahanshahi, an assistant professor in Purdue University's Lyles School of Civil Engineering. "However, current inspection practices are time consuming, tedious and subjective because they involve an operator manually locating cracks in metallic surfaces." Other automatic crack detection algorithms under development often do not detect cracks in metallic surfaces because the cracks are usually small, have low contrast and are difficult to distinguish from welds, scratches and grind marks. The new system, called CRAQ, for crack recognition and quantification, overcomes this limitation by using an advanced algorithm and a powerful "machine learning" technique to detect cracks based on the changing texture surrounding cracks on steel surfaces. Findings are detailed in a research paper published this week in Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering. The paper is available online at http://onlinelibrary. . The automated approach could help improve the state of the nation's infrastructure, recently given an overall grade of D+ by the American Society of Civil Engineers, he said. "One reason we have a grade of D+ for the infrastructure is insufficient inspection," said Jahanshahi, director of Purdue's Smart Informatix Laboratory. "So we want to have more frequent inspection using robotic systems to collect data." The nation operates 99 commercial nuclear power plants, which account for about 20 percent of total U.S. electricity generation. Aging can result in cracking, fatigue, embrittlement of metal components, wear, erosion, corrosion and oxidation. "Cracking is an important factor in aging degradation that may cause leaking and result in hazardous incidents," Jahanshahi said. "For instance, the Millstone nuclear power station in Connecticut had an accident in 1996 that was caused by a leaking valve, and the accident cost $254 million. In 2010, the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant had an accident where deteriorating underground pipes leaked radioactive tritium into groundwater supplies, resulting in $700 million in damage." Complicating the inspection process is that nuclear reactors are submerged in water to maintain cooling. "Consequently, direct manual inspection of reactor internals is not feasible due to high temperatures and radiation hazards," Jahanshahi said. "So remotely recorded videos at the underwater reactor surface are used for inspection. However, recent testing has identi?ed a need for increased reliability associated with identifying cracks from reviews of live and recorded data. The results indicate that this capability is degraded by human involvement in identifying cracks, even when identi?cation should be easy." Other automated crack-detection systems under development are designed for processing single images, whereas the new method processes multiple video frames, providing more robust results. Findings show the system outperformed two others under development. "In contrast to other methods that only focus on detecting cracks in one image, we propose a method called Bayesian data fusion that tracks detected cracks in video frames and fuses the information obtained from multiple frames," Jahanshahi said. "Moreover, we can ?lter out falsely detected cracks and increase the reliability and robustness of crack detection by using Bayesian decision theory," which determines the probability that an object is a crack or a false alarm. The system assigns "con?dence levels" automatically assessing whether the detected cracks are real, outlining the cracks with color-coded boxes that correspond to these confidence levels. For example, if the algorithm assigns a high confidence level to a crack, the box outline is red. The processing procedure takes about a minute. "Then, a technician could do a manual inspection to confirm that there is a crack," Jahanshahi said. A YouTube video is available at: https:/ . The research paper was authored by doctoral student Fu-Chen Chen; Jahanshahi; doctoral student Rih-Teng Wu; and Chris Joffe, technical leader for Non-destructive Evaluation at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), a nonprofit organization funded by the electric utility industry. Researchers recorded videos using an underwater camera system scanning 304 stainless steel specimens containing cracks and also features such as welds, grinding marks and scratches. Future research will include work to develop a more accurate and more fully automated system using advanced simulations and computational software. "We are currently working on the second version of the software by developing deep learning algorithms to detect cracks for this application where we have significantly improved the performance of the system using Constitutional Neural Networks," Jahanshahi said. The researchers have filed a patent application through the Office of Technology Commercialization of the Purdue Research Foundation. The research was supported in part under a contract with EPRI. A new automated system developed at Purdue University detects cracks in the steel components of nuclear power plants. Here, the system accurately distinguishes between cracks and other features, outlined in red-colored boxes. (Image care of EPRI) A publication-quality photo is available at https:/ Mohammad R. Jahanshahi, left, an assistant professor in Purdue's Lyles School of Civil Engineering, and doctoral student Fu-Chen Chen review results using the new system. (Purdue University image/Erin Easterling) A publication-quality photo is available at https:/ A Texture-based Video Processing Methodology Using Bayesian Data Fusion for Autonomous Crack Detection on Metallic Surfaces 1School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University 2Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University 3Electric Power Research Institute Regular inspection of the components of nuclear power plants is important to improve their resilience. However, current inspection practices are time consuming, tedious, and subjective: they involve an operator manually locating cracks in metallic surfaces in the plant by watching videos. At the same time, prevalent automatic crack detection algorithms may not detect cracks in metallic surfaces because these are typically very small and have low contrast. Moreover, the existence of scratches, welds, and grind marks leads to a large number of false positives when state-of-the-art vision-based crack detection algorithms are used. In this study, a novel crack detection approach is proposed based on local binary patterns (LBP) to identify crack patches in each video frame. These patches are then grouped to form a bounding box for each crack. Furthermore, the bounding boxes corresponding to each crack in different video frames are tracked and aggregated using Bayesian decision theory to enhance the robustness and reliability of detection. The proposed approach is also optimized to reduce computation time. The performance of the proposed approach was assessed by using several inspection videos, and the results showed that it is accurate and robust in cases where state-of-the-art crack detection approaches fail. Note to Journalists: A copy of the research paper is available from Emil Venere, Purdue News Service, at 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu. A YouTube video is available https:/ and other video is accessible on Google Drive https:/ . The video was produced by Erin Easterling, Purdue College of Engineering digital producer, 765-496-3388, Easterling@purdue.edu


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Nanotechnology - What You Should Know Graphene - Here's What You Should Know It is common knowledge that accidents in nuclear power plants lead to hazardous consequences with long-term implications. Examples include the Chernobyl catastrophe in Russia. One of the reasons for accidents is the failure to detect the cracks on components well in advance. Routine inspections may not be able to identify the cracks and they evade detection because the inspection methods may not keep pace with an aging plant's structural problems. Thanks to a new automated system developed at Purdue University, the steel components of nuclear power plants can be examined more accurately compared to other existing systems. This was revealed in a study published in the Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering journal. The paper was authored by Fu-Chen Chen, a doctoral student. As nuclear plants age, they face problems of fatigue, wear and tear, erosion, embrittlement of metal components, corrosion, and oxidation. This calls for a stepped-up periodic foolproof inspection to ward off any future calamities. "Periodic inspection of the components of nuclear power plants is important to avoid accidents and ensure safe operation," noted Mohammad R. Jahanshahi, an assistant professor at Purdue University's Lyles School of Civil Engineering and the paper's co-author. According to the expert, the current inspection methods have many defects, including lack of objectivity that takes away a lot of time and the faults of operators who try to manually locate cracks in metallic surfaces. The new automated system called CRAQ uses advanced algorithms and machine learning to detect cracks on the basis of changes in the texture that appear on steel surfaces. Detecting cracks in metallic surfaces is a challenge because many of the automatic crack detection algorithms cannot trace them as they are too tiny and hard to distinguish from welds, scratches, and grind marks. At the moment, remotely recorded videos are used for inspection. The complexity of the inspection process of nuclear plants is aggravated by the fact that nuclear reactors are submerged in water for cooling purposes. "Consequently, direct manual inspection of reactor internals is not feasible due to high temperatures and radiation hazards," Jahanshahi said. He noted that cracking-led degradation would lead to hazardous accidents and huge financial costs. "For instance, the Millstone nuclear power station in Connecticut had an accident in 1996 that was caused by a leaking valve, and the accident cost $254 million," the co-author added. According to the researchers, greater reliability needs to be maintained in accepting the results of videos taken during inspection because they are recorded at the underwater reactor surface with scope for many imperfections. The Purdue researchers, in evolving their new system, used videos taken by an underwater camera system and scanned more than 300 stainless steel specimens that had cracks, grinding marks, scratches, and weld marks. Their analysis went beyond the conventional single-image processing as they used multiple video frames to arrive at the best results. The new system showed itself as superior to many other systems. In the new method, the cracks have been identified by a method called "Bayesian data fusion," which tracks cracks via video frames from the information coming from multiple frames. Certainly, the new system will benefit the American nuclear plants, which recently received an overall D+ rating by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Meanwhile, Toshiba's decision to quit the business of nuclear power plants has hit the sector, as innovation and research on reactor designs will be a casualty. A majority stake in Westinghouse Electric by the Japanese conglomerate had raised hopes that new generation power plants that are safer, smaller, cheaper will be in the offing. However, rising cost overruns, technical problems, and regulatory challenges in many projects led to Toshiba announcing a $6.3 billion write-down in the nuclear business and a planned offloading of its stake in the company. "It looked like a big deal at the time, but it's turned into a mess," said Michael Golay, a professor at MIT. The retreat of Toshiba comes when the International Energy Agency estimated that nuclear energy capacity would need to double by 2050 to prevent worldwide temperatures from increasing more than 2 degrees Celsius. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A new automated system detects cracks in the steel components of nuclear power plants and has been shown to be more accurate than other automated systems. "Periodic inspection of the components of nuclear power plants is important to avoid accidents and ensure safe operation," said Mohammad R. Jahanshahi, an assistant professor in Purdue University's Lyles School of Civil Engineering. "However, current inspection practices are time consuming, tedious and subjective because they involve an operator manually locating cracks in metallic surfaces." Other automatic crack detection algorithms under development often do not detect cracks in metallic surfaces because the cracks are usually small, have low contrast and are difficult to distinguish from welds, scratches and grind marks. The new system, called CRAQ, for crack recognition and quantification, overcomes this limitation by using an advanced algorithm and a powerful "machine learning" technique to detect cracks based on the changing texture surrounding cracks on steel surfaces. Findings are detailed in a research paper published this week in Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering. The automated approach could help improve the state of the nation's infrastructure, recently given an overall grade of D+ by the American Society of Civil Engineers, he said. "One reason we have a grade of D+ for the infrastructure is insufficient inspection," said Jahanshahi, director of Purdue's Smart Informatix Laboratory. "So we want to have more frequent inspection using robotic systems to collect data." The nation operates 99 commercial nuclear power plants, which account for about 20 percent of total U.S. electricity generation. Aging can result in cracking, fatigue, embrittlement of metal components, wear, erosion, corrosion and oxidation. "Cracking is an important factor in aging degradation that may cause leaking and result in hazardous incidents," Jahanshahi said. "For instance, the Millstone nuclear power station in Connecticut had an accident in 1996 that was caused by a leaking valve, and the accident cost $254 million. In 2010, the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant had an accident where deteriorating underground pipes leaked radioactive tritium into groundwater supplies, resulting in $700 million in damage." "Consequently, direct manual inspection of reactor internals is not feasible due to high temperatures and radiation hazards," Jahanshahi said. "So remotely recorded videos at the underwater reactor surface are used for inspection. However, recent testing has identified a need for increased reliability associated with identifying cracks from reviews of live and recorded data. The results indicate that this capability is degraded by human involvement in identifying cracks, even when identification should be easy." Other automated crack-detection systems under development are designed for processing single images, whereas the new method processes multiple video frames, providing more robust results. Findings show the system outperformed two others under development. "In contrast to other methods that only focus on detecting cracks in one image, we propose a method called Bayesian data fusion that tracks detected cracks in video frames and fuses the information obtained from multiple frames," Jahanshahi said. "Moreover, we can filter out falsely detected cracks and increase the reliability and robustness of crack detection by using Bayesian decision theory," which determines the probability that an object is a crack or a false alarm. The system assigns "confidence levels" automatically assessing whether the detected cracks are real, outlining the cracks with color-coded boxes that correspond to these confidence levels. For example, if the algorithm assigns a high confidence level to a crack, the box outline is red. The processing procedure takes about a minute. "Then, a technician could do a manual inspection to confirm that there is a crack," Jahanshahi said. Researchers recorded videos using an underwater camera system scanning 304 stainless steel specimens containing cracks and also features such as welds, grinding marks and scratches. Future research will include work to develop a more accurate and more fully automated system using advanced simulations and computational software. "We are currently working on the second version of the software by developing deep learning algorithms to detect cracks for this application where we have significantly improved the performance of the system using Constitutional Neural Networks," Jahanshahi said. The researchers have filed a patent application through the Office of Technology Commercialization of the Purdue Research Foundation.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DAVENPORT, Iowa--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Following a 10-month review, the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) today issued an order adjusting rates for Iowa American Water. Iowa American Water’s investment of approximately $38 million in water system improvements is the primary driver behind the rate change request. In its final rate order, the IUB approved an overall increase in additional annual revenue of $3.9 million or 10.37 percent. This final order amount includes the previous temporary rate increase of $2.1 million that was implemented by Iowa American Water on May 9, 2016 as allowed by Iowa Code § 476.6(9). Company officials say those additional revenues will help Iowa American Water continue to invest proactively in its water infrastructure throughout the state. Iowa American Water last received a rate change order from the IUB in 2014. “ Reliable water service is essential to everyday life and a community’s strong economy, and proactive water system upgrades today save money in the long run,” said Randy Moore, president of Iowa American Water. “ All these investments in local water infrastructure systems enhance water quality, service reliability and fire protection for customers while keeping the cost of water service for most local households at about a penny per gallon.” The need to upgrade water systems is a national challenge. In 2013, the American Society of Civil Engineers said that an estimated $1 trillion in capital spending would be needed across the nation over 25 years to replace thousands of miles of pipe, upgrade treatment plants and comply with stricter water quality standards. Iowa American Water is addressing this challenge. Iowa American Water’s rates are based on the costs of providing water service as reviewed and approved by the IUB. Moore added that Iowa American Water has worked to control costs, reducing operating expenses by about 10 percent or $1.7 million since the last rate order. The next step in the process will be for Iowa American Water to prepare and file a rate design for approval by the IUB that breaks down the allowed increase between the company’s various customer classifications. An effective date for the new rates will be established once the IUB approves the company’s rate design. On April 29, 2016, Iowa American Water filed a proposal with the IUB requesting to increase its annual revenue by $5.15 million. Effective May 9, 2016, Iowa American Water implemented an interim rate increase as part of its rate increase application as allowed under state regulations. The interim increase allowed Iowa American to begin collecting a portion of its rate increase while the IUB and Office of Consumer Advocate (“OCA”) reviewed the full filing. The interim rates generated about $2.1 million in additional annual revenue and represent a $2.33 per month increase for the average residential customer. “ As a utility whose services are critical to ensuring public health, we take our responsibility to provide quality drinking water seriously, and as such, are committed to keeping our systems and facilities well maintained,” added Moore. Customers needing assistance paying their water bills can contact Community Action of Eastern Iowa to apply for help from Iowa American Water’s Project H2O “Help to Others” program. Community Action of Eastern Iowa administers this program, and customers needing assistance are urged to contact their local office in either Clinton or Davenport. Customers can contact American Water's Call Service Center toll free at 1-866-641-2108 with additional questions. Additional information can also be found on the Iowa Utilities Board’s website at www.state.ia.us/iub/. Iowa American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water services to approximately 212,000 people. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly-traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,700 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.


RYE, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Gabelli & Company is pleased to announce that Mark W. Woodson, P.E., L.S., D.WRE, F.ASCE, the 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers President, will deliver a keynote address on America’s critical infrastructure spending needs at its 27th Annual Pump, Valve & Water Systems Symposium on March 1 in New York City. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) represents more than 150,000 members of the civil engineering profession in 177 countries. Founded in 1852, ASCE is the nation’s oldest engineering society. ASCE stands at the forefront of a profession that plans, designs, constructs, and operates society’s economic and social engine – the built environment – while protecting and restoring the natural environment. Mr. Woodson’s keynote will cover the facts behind the Report Card for America’s Infrastructure (infrastructurereportcard.org). The Report Card gave a GPA of “D+” to the nation’s infrastructure in 2013. The next Report Card will be released on March 9, 2017. Mr. Woodson will address the economic case for America’s infrastructure and the solutions that can close our infrastructure competitiveness gap compared to other nations. Mr. Woodson received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering in 1979 and an MBA in 1985 from the University of Arizona in Tucson. Mark is a licensed civil engineer and surveyor in California and Arizona. In 1994, Mr. Woodson received the Arizona Civil Engineer Distinguished Service award from the Arizona Section of ASCE. In 2002, he was awarded the John C. Park Outstanding Engineering award by the Arizona Section of ASCE. In 2002, he was elected as a Fellow in the American Society of Civil Engineers. In 2013 he became a Diplomate of Water Resources Engineering. In 2014, Mr. Woodson was elected to become the 2016 ASCE President. Institutional investors should contact their Gabelli & Company sales representative to register.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MERRICK, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--New York American Water announced today it has named Carmen Tierno its new president, effective March 1, 2017. Tierno replaces Brian Bruce, who has been named president of West Virginia American Water. “We are so pleased to see both Brian and Carmen take on new expanded roles at American Water,” said American Water’s chief operating officer Walter Lynch. “We thank Brian for his leadership in New York and are excited for Carmen to join the New York team. Carmen has been a great asset to New Jersey American Water in a variety of roles and has been a key contributor in improving service to our customers in that state. I know his experience in all aspects of the water industry and his commitment to customer service excellence will suit him well in this new role.” Tierno currently serves as New Jersey American Water’s senior director of the company’s Southwest district operations. Tierno has more than 25 years of experience in the water industry and has been with New Jersey American Water for 20 years in various capacities. As senior director, Tierno is responsible for safety, transmission and distribution, field customer service, meter reading, and the overall performance of New Jersey American Water operations in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, and Salem counties. Previously, Tierno worked for the Philadelphia Water Department and then joined New Jersey American Water as an operations engineer. He also served as an engineering manager and as director of customer relations and director of business performance. Tierno earned his MBA from Rutgers University and his Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from Widener University. He has been active with the Water for People charity for more than 15 years and visited Honduras to review water and sanitation projects. Tierno is a member of the American Water Works Association and American Society of Civil Engineers. New York American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water company in New York, providing high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 350,000 people. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,800 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.

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