American Society of Breast Surgeons

Columbia, MD, United States

American Society of Breast Surgeons

Columbia, MD, United States
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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Dr. Chen previously served as the chief of breast surgery at UC Davis Medical Center, followed by a position as an associate professor of surgery and as the associate program director of the surgical oncology training program at City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California. He maintains an active surgical oncology clinical practice in San Diego, while also maintaining clinical research interests in quality of care measures, health outcomes, and cost-effectiveness. Dr. Chen also was recently elected as the president of the American Society of Breast Surgeons, the country's largest organization for breast surgery. Dr. Chen received his medical degree and completed general surgery and critical care residencies at the University of Michigan, followed by a surgical oncology fellowship at the John Wayne Cancer Institute. He obtained an MBA at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business. Avelas Biosciences is a San Diego-based biotechnology company focused on developing technologies that advance a new standard-of-care for cancer surgery and therapeutic intervention. The company's lead candidate, AVB-620, has completed a Phase 1b clinical trial assessing safety, pharmacokinetics and fluorescence properties using tissue image analysis. The initiation of a Phase 2 clinical trial for AVB-620 in breast cancer is expected in the first half of 2017. In addition, the company is advancing a therapeutic program, which utilizes the same technology platform. Avelas was founded by Avalon Ventures on technology from Roger Y. Tsien, Ph.D., co-winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in chemistry. For additional information, please visit www.avelasbio.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/avelas-biosciences-appoints-steven-chen-as-chief-medical-officer-300451706.html


News Article | March 31, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

In women who have cancer in one breast, removing both breasts is not necessarily helpful. The American Society of Breast Surgeons, in fact, issued a statement last year in a bid to discourage women diagnosed with one-sided breast cancer but without genetic risk for the disease from getting double or contralateral mastectomy. Researchers, however, have found an increase in contralateral mastectomy among women whose early stage cancer only affects one breast. It also appears that the trend varies across states. In a study covering the period between 2004 and 2012, researchers looked at more than 1.2 million women with early stage cancer in one breast and found that 15 percent of patients between 20 and 44 years old got preventive mastectomy in the District of Columbia, which is far lower compared with about 49 percent in South Dakota. "In this cohort study of more than 1.2 million women who received a diagnosis of invasive unilateral early-stage breast cancer treated with surgery, the proportion of contralateral prophylactic mastectomies varied substantially by state," the researchers wrote in their study. "The proportion among women 20 to 44 years of age during the period from 2010 to 2012 ranged from 15.7% in Hawaii to 42.8% to 48.5% in 5 contiguous Midwestern states." The general trend, however, rises as the proportion of women with early stage cancer in one breast between ages 20 and 44 who opted for the contralateral mastectomy increased from 11 percent to about 33 percent across the country. Over this same period, the proportion in similar patients who were at least 45 years old who had double mastectomy also increased from about 4 percent to about 10 percent. Study researcher Ahmedin Jemal, of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, said that their research, which was published in JAMA Surgery on March 29, cannot explain why so many women now opt for contralateral mastectomies. "One factor that could contribute to the increase is this desire for symmetry," Jemal said. "Another factor is probably the Angelina Jolie effect. She was diagnosed with the BRCA-1 cancer gene that mutation that causes breast cancer, and she had a double mastectomy, so that was covered widely in the media." The researcher also said that the rate in the United States is higher compared with that in other countries. Compared with 13.5 percent of women in the United States with cancer in one breast who opted to have the other breast removed, the rate is only between 2 and 3 percent in the UK. Jemal and colleagues did not also have information on how many women in the study had increased risk for breast cancer due to genetics or because they had already been treated with radiation therapy to the chest. Jemal said that doctors need to have detailed discussion with women about treatment options, but some women who are not at increased risk still opt to have the cancer-free breast removed regardless of learning about the risks and benefits. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Hoag Physicians Selected to Teach Unique Breast Conserving Operative Technique at National Meeting for The American Society of Breast Surgeons Newport Beach, CA, May 01, 2017 --( This prestigious opportunity allowed Drs. Silverstein and Savalia to discuss and teach the Split Reduction, an operative technique developed and perfected at Hoag, for surgeons across the nation. Combining the principles of oncologic surgery with the techniques of plastic surgery, this technique alters the incision site on a patient’s breast to accommodate tumors that other oncologists said could not be removed without a mastectomy. “Hoag is the most advanced place in the world for saving breasts for patients who are told they need a mastectomy,” Dr. Silverstein said. “Women have so many treatment options, including lumpectomies and oncoplastic surgery to remove cancerous tumors while achieving optimal cosmetic and oncologic results. It is surprising that mastectomy is still the default surgical option for breast cancer treatment,” Dr. Savalia added. In addition, five research poster presentations were presented at the national meeting by Hoag faculty and USC/Hoag Breast Fellows on the following topics: A Comparison of Margin Width in DCIS Patients Treated with Breast Conserving Surgery Plus Whole Breast Radiation Therapy. Data supported the Consensus Guideline: 2 mm is an appropriate minimal margin width for patients with DCIS patients treated with breast conserving therapy plus whole breast radiation therapy. Analysis of data found a higher local recurrence rate with narrow surgical margins (< 2mm margins) at 31% compared with the adequately excised group (≥ 2mm margins) at 11%. Authors: Sadia Khan, DO, Program Advisor Hoag Breast Center, Melvin J. Silverstein, MD, Hoag Breast Center Medical Director and the Gross Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Oncoplastic Breast Surgery, et al Excision alone for low risk Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ (DCIS) using University of Southern California/Van Nuys Prognostic Index (USC/VNPI). Findings confirm reports that whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) may be safely omitted in patients with low-risk DCIS. Established the UCS/VNPI algorithm that quantifies five measurable prognostic factors (tumor size, margin width, nuclear grade, age and comedonecrosis) and aids in predicting local recurrence in conservatively treated patients. Authors: Nicole Zaremba, MD (2017 Muzzy Family Endowed Fellowship in Oncoplastic Breast Surgery at Hoag), et al Outcome After Local Invasive Recurrence: The Impact of Original Diagnosis of DCIS Versus Invasive Cancer. Found that patients with an original diagnosis of invasive breast cancer have higher probability of developing an invasive local recurrence when compared to patients with an original diagnosis of DCIS (42% versus 12%). Authors: Julie Wecsler, MD (USC/Hoag Breast Fellow), et al Four-Year Results of a Single Site X-Ray IORT Trial for Early Breast Cancer. Studied intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a safe alternative to whole breast radiation (WBRT) for low-risk breast cancer patients. Found the rate of local ipsilateral breast tumor events is somewhat higher than those reported in WBRT patients but lower than those described in patients treated with excision alone. Authors: Melinda Epstein, Ph.D., et al Intraductal Papillomas: To Excise or Not Excise Authors: Sayee Kiran, MD (USC/Hoag Breast Fellow), et al This research was presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. Joining the Hoag Breast team at the national meeting was the winner of the 2017 International Scholarship in Breast Surgery Juan Cossa, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery, Clinics Hospital of Montevideo, Uruguay. Dr. Cossa was selected by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBS) and chose to visit Hoag when given the opportunity to study at any cancer hospital in the United States. “It was an honor to have Dr. Cossa join our team and have the opportunity to teach him about oncoplastic surgery,” said Dr. Silverstein. “Hoag continues to pioneer innovative medical and surgical advancements and it’s a privilege to be able to share that knowledge with surgeons around the world.” Newport Beach, CA, May 01, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Melvin J. Silverstein, M.D., Hoag Breast Center Medical Director and the Gross Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Oncoplastic Breast Surgery and Nirav Savalia, M.D., Director of Oncoplastic and Aesthetic Breast Surgery at Hoag, were among the faculty selected by the American Society of Breast Surgeons to teach the Annual Oncoplastic Breast Surgery Course at the national meeting held this year in Las Vegas on April 26-30, 2017.This prestigious opportunity allowed Drs. Silverstein and Savalia to discuss and teach the Split Reduction, an operative technique developed and perfected at Hoag, for surgeons across the nation. Combining the principles of oncologic surgery with the techniques of plastic surgery, this technique alters the incision site on a patient’s breast to accommodate tumors that other oncologists said could not be removed without a mastectomy.“Hoag is the most advanced place in the world for saving breasts for patients who are told they need a mastectomy,” Dr. Silverstein said.“Women have so many treatment options, including lumpectomies and oncoplastic surgery to remove cancerous tumors while achieving optimal cosmetic and oncologic results. It is surprising that mastectomy is still the default surgical option for breast cancer treatment,” Dr. Savalia added.In addition, five research poster presentations were presented at the national meeting by Hoag faculty and USC/Hoag Breast Fellows on the following topics:A Comparison of Margin Width in DCIS Patients Treated with Breast Conserving Surgery Plus Whole Breast Radiation Therapy. Data supported the Consensus Guideline: 2 mm is an appropriate minimal margin width for patients with DCIS patients treated with breast conserving therapy plus whole breast radiation therapy. Analysis of data found a higher local recurrence rate with narrow surgical margins ( Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian


In 2012, one in three women with breast cancer who are under 45 years old opted to have her healthy breast removed along with the affected breast. The rate marks a significant increase from a rate of just one in 10 younger breast cancer patients who had double mastectomies eight years earlier. Experts said that the decision to undergo additional surgery is an extremely personal decision. However, researchers of the new study that examined the proportion of women diagnosed with cancer in one breast who undergo double mastectomy said that evidence does not support the need to have the healthy breast removed in average-risk women. "The use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomies (CPMs) among patients with invasive unilateral breast cancer has increased substantially during the past decade in the United States despite the lack of evidence for survival benefit," said Ahmedin Jemal of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta. The American Society of Breast Surgeons and the American Board of Internal Medicine also do not recommend the practice known as contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, except in women who have an unusually high risk of developing a new cancer because of genetic factors - such as having the mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The "Angelina Jolie effect" is being attributed to as a potential factor for the rising rates in double mastectomy, but the actress, who decided to have both her breast removed, has BRCA gene mutation, which increases her risk of breast cancer. E. Shelley Hwang from the Duke Cancer Institute has studied the quality of life of patients who underwent double mastectomies. She said that the new research, which was published in JAMA on March 29, underscores the fact that women make the decision out of anxiety and not because of medical necessity. Mehra Golshan from the Brigham and Women's Hospital, who co-authored a 2015 study that found an increase in patients with stage 1 to stage 3 cancer in one breast who decided to have CPM, expressed her concern over the trend. "I wasn't surprised, because I see it every day in my practice - but it is somewhat concerning," Golshan said. "Double mastectomy isn't without risks, especially when you have reconstruction, too - which the majority of women choose to do. And it doesn't increase your chance of surviving the cancer, because breast cancer is unlikely to spread to the other breast." Lisa Newman, from the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, advised women to discuss the procedure with their surgeons first. She noted that while removing the healthy breast may provide reconstruction advantages, this does not offer survival advantage and may even open a door to complications. "These surgical options do not provide any survival advantage," Newman said. "We as physicians must ensure that [patients] understand that the more extensive surgery has a higher complication rate; that it is risk-reducing but not risk-eliminating; and that it does not improve likelihood of curative treatment for the initially diagnosed breast cancer." © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


His scientific poster was presented at the 2017 American Society of Breast Surgeons annual meeting. Dr. Cross has in previous studies also reported a trend toward shorter courses of radiation therapy in cases where patients were treated through breast-conserving lumpectomy surgery. "If we can deliver less overall radiation with better cosmetic results and just as good survival rates, then it's a win-win-win scenario," said Dr. Cross. This observational, retrospective study encompassed a total of 1,115 patients who underwent breast cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. The use of lumpectomy in Dr. Cross's practice increased by 27.7% during the study period. In 2011-2013 -- the period before the marker was used routinely in the practice's breast surgeries – Dr. Cross performed 540 breast cancer surgeries and the lumpectomy rate was 37.7%. During 2014-2016 when the device was consistently used, he performed 575 breast cancer surgeries and the lumpectomy rate was 48%. Because Dr. Cross's data is from a single practice with a largely rural patient population, he said further research was needed to see if his results are generalizable to other practices that serve patients with different characteristics. The unique BioZorb implant is sutured into the tumor site and is the first device that identifies where the breast cancer tumor was removed in a fixed, three-dimensional manner. After lumpectomy surgery, the implant helps the radiation oncologist plan treatments more reliably and determine where to aim the radiation in a more targeted fashion. The implant consists of a framework made of a bioabsorbable material that holds six titanium clips.  The framework of the device slowly dissolves in the body over the course of a year or more while the small marker clips remain at the surgical site and can be viewed for long-term monitoring such as mammograms. Studies have reported the rate of complications such as infection (2-3%) is virtually the same as for lumpectomy surgery without the implant. Breast cancer can be treated by mastectomy (breast removal) or by lumpectomy. With lumpectomy, a small amount of tissue containing the tumor is removed. In addition to the surgery, it is important to add radiation treatment to "clean up" any microscopic cancer cells that might remain behind in the breast. The addition of radiation allows surgeons to safely conserve the breast tissue, while decreasing the chances of cancer recurring in the same location. The favorable cosmetic results with the device are due in part to its advantages for oncoplastic surgery (OPS), Dr. Cross said. OPS emphasizes both cancer control and a better cosmetic outcome. It reconstructs and reshapes the breast to avoid deformities that can occur after healing from surgery and radiation. "Because of the BioZorb's shape, it helps me use the patients' own tissue for reconstruction at the time of lumpectomy – so I like to use the term 'reconstructive lumpectomy' when I explain what the surgery will entail," Dr. Cross said. "In my practice, this is now the routine standard with appropriately selected patients." The marker enhances oncoplastic surgery because it helps fill the space left by the tumor removal, while also providing a sort of scaffold for the breast tissue as it heals. In addition, the implant clearly delineates the tumor's previous location. This enables follow-up radiation therapy to be delivered more precisely, according to previous studies of the device. Better-targeted radiotherapy can have a positive impact on cosmetic outcomes and can help protect healthy body structures such as the heart and lungs from radiation exposure. Dr. Cross said the ability to deliver shorter, hypofractionated radiation therapy provides a substantial benefit for his patient population. This shorter course of radiation allows women to receive their radiation therapy over three to four weeks, instead of the usual five to six weeks. Many of his patients live far from Fayetteville and have to travel several hours to the city. Patients who receive hypofractionated radiation therapy have to travel far less often for treatment. The ability to get a shorter course of radiation may lead more women to choose breast-conserving surgery (BCS) instead of a mastectomy. (BCS is usually followed up with radiation therapy, while a mastectomy normally is not.) The BioZorb device is now widely used by breast surgeons and general surgeons throughout the U.S. The data was presented as a scientific poster at the annual meeting of the American Society of Breast Surgeons annual meeting held April 26-30 in Las Vegas. Focal Therapeutics, which makes the BioZorb device, provided writing and research support for Dr. Cross's presentation. About Dr. Cross and Breast Treatment Associates in Fayetteville Michael J. Cross, M.D., F.A.C.S., is a surgical oncologist who practices at Breast Treatment Associates in Fayetteville, Ark. His practice is focused on the diagnosis and treatment of medical and surgical diseases of the breast. He is widely published in the medical literature and participated in the nationally prominent American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) breast cancer trials. He is a member of the faculty of the School of Oncoplastic Surgery and teaches both nationally and internationally. For more information about Breast Treatment Associates, call (479) 582-1000 or access www.breasttreatment.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/local-surgeon-reports-positive-findings-from-use-of-3d-marker-in-breast-cancer-treatment-300453838.html


Dr. Leonard concluded that "the BioZorb system may offer an advantage in more precisely defining the lumpectomy site and in sparing larger volumes of healthy breast tissue from radiation." The poster also said the implant is particularly helpful for boost planning. The study was a retrospective analysis of women who had received radiation treatment for breast cancer in the radiation oncology department at Rhode Island Hospital, in Providence, R.I. The study covered all women treated at the department during the year-long span from May 2015 through April 2016. The data encompassed 117 patients – 42 of whom received a BioZorb implant and 75 who did not. The researchers compared records of women who received the marker to the records of patients who were not implanted with the device. Most of the women who did not have the marker implanted were treated before the device was adopted for use by the department. Among measurements recorded for each patient were the amount of tissue removed during each patient's lumpectomy, and the amount of radiation each patient was targeted to receive – that is, the tumor bed volume. The tumor bed volume was substantially smaller for the patients who received the BioZorb device, a difference that was statistically significant. More accurate radiation has several potential benefits for breast cancer patients. It can help improve cosmetic outcomes as well as help to protect healthy body structures such as the heart and lungs from radiation exposure. Dr. Leonard is a radiation oncologist at Rhode Island Hospital (Providence, R.I.) and an assistant professor of radiation oncology at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. BioZorb is the first and only device that identifies in a reliable way the three-dimensional region where the tumor was removed. By suturing the implant to the tumor bed, the surgeon can more precisely indicate to the radiation oncologist where the cancer was located. Because of the marker's unique configuration, it allows oncoplastic surgery to be used for reconstructing the breast with the patient's own tissues, while at the same time delineating the tumor's previous location. The marker consists of a framework made of a bioabsorbable material that holds six titanium clips. The implant serves as a guide for the radiation oncologist during planning of radiation treatments that are delivered after surgery. The device's framework slowly dissolves in the body over the course of a year or more. The marker clips remain at the surgical site and can be viewed for long-term monitoring. Studies have reported the complication rate such as infection (2-3%) is virtually the same as for lumpectomy surgery and follow-up radiation without the implant. The American Society of Breast Surgeons annual meeting was held April 26-30 in Las Vegas. Focal Therapeutics is a medical device company based in Aliso Viejo, Calif. The company's BioZorb marker is a proprietary bioabsorbable device that provides radiographic marking of soft tissue sites. The BioZorb device is placed at the time of surgical removal of tissue, such as during breast surgery, and the device's three-dimensional array of marker clips has unique clinical utility for patient imaging. BioZorb has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The device is available in a range of sizes to accommodate a variety of clinical situations. For more information about the company, call (U.S.) 650-530-2394 or email info@focaltherapeutics.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/research-shows-breast-cancer-surgery-marker-associated-with-smaller-radiation-volume-300463611.html


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Breast Surgeon, Dr. Dennis Holmes of 90210 Surgery Medical Center will review minimally invasive cryoablation for the treatment of early stage breast cancer and where it fits in the treatment paradigm at Susan G. Komen San Diego’s Annual Dinner Symposium, “Screens, Genes & The Choices We Make.” The event brings together leading cancer and wellness experts to share the latest innovations in breast cancer research, treatment and holistic well-being. The symposium will take place on Thursday, March 16, 2017 at the San Diego Del Mar Marriott. Dr. Holmes is an internationally renowned breast surgeon and cancer researcher currently serving as Interim Director of the Margie Petersen Breast Center at Providence St. John’s Health Center and Interim Director, John Wayne Cancer Institute Breast Surgery Fellowship Program. Formerly, Dr. Holmes held the positions of Chief Breast Surgeon and Medical Director of the Los Angeles Center for Women’s Health, and Chief Breast Cancer Surgeon, and Breast Cancer Research Committee Co-Chair at the University of Southern California Kenneth Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Holmes has been a pioneer in the field of minimally invasive breast surgery, including intraoperative radiotherapy, lymph node-sparing surgery and cryoablation “I am thrilled to partner with Komen San Diego, as we share similar goals - to save lives and pursue the best breast cancer treatments,” said Dr. Holmes. Currently, the standard of care for early stage breast cancer is surgery (e.g. lumpectomy, mastectomy) and sentinel node biopsy followed by breast radiotherapy and adjuvant endocrine and/or chemotherapy. Although surgery offers tumor removal and margin verification, a major drawback of surgery is the cosmetic and functional impairment of the breast resulting from volume changes, scar formation, nipple displacement, sensation changes, skin/scar retraction, and re-excision rate. Dr. Holmes was an investigator in the National Cancer Institute Z1072 Clinical Trial sponsored by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. The trial examined cryoablation for the treatment of early stage breast cancer. In a 5-year multicenter study, cryoablation was shown to be 92% effective for complete ablation of invasive breast tumors ≤2 cm and 100% effective for complete ablation of invasive ductal breast cancer tumors <1.0 cm. Results from this breast cancer study (ACOSOG Z1072), which included a 5-year follow-up, were published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology. The Visica® 2 Treatment System developed by Sanarus Technologies, was the exclusive device used in the Z1072 study. “Cryoablation is a very promising alternative to traditional surgery for early stage breast cancer. Cryoablation minimizes changes in breast volume and nipple position, and avoids prominent scars,” explained Dr. Holmes. “The outstanding results of Z0172 inspired me to start the FROST Clinical Study, for which I now serve as Principal Investigator.” The FROST Clinical Study is the evolution of data from Z1072, which examines the rate of successful tumor ablation in patients treated with cryoablation of the primary tumor instead of surgical removal of early stage breast cancer. The FROST Clinical Study is currently enrolling women age 50 and older with core needle biopsy proven clinical stage I, T1, (≤1.5 cm) clinically node negative (N0), unifocal, hormone receptor positive and HER2/neu-negative invasive ductal carcinoma. Cryoablation with the Visica 2 Treatment System is a nonsurgical option for patients that have been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer, is visible on sonogram, and has been confirmed with a biopsy. This procedure has many benefits including: under 30-minutes, local anesthesia, in-office, excellent cosmesis, cost efficient, and quick patient recovery. Cryoablation is a viable option to surgery that results in complete early stage tumor ablation. About Dr. Holmes Dr. Holmes serves in the leadership of several national surgical societies and is a frequent lecturer at national conferences. He is a member of the education committee of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. Dr. Holmes is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and was also recently selected as Board Chair and President of the TARGIT Collaborative Group, a national research and education organization. Widely respected by colleagues for his innovative approach to breast cancer care, Dr. Holmes has gained worldwide acclaim for his pioneering research in targeted intraoperative radiotherapy. Dr. Holmes believes wholeheartedly that, with proper treatment, most women diagnosed with breast cancer will live a long, fulfilling life—a life both richer and more meaningful than they could have ever imagined. Find out more at http://www.drholmesmd.com About Sanarus Technologies In 2001, the Visica® 2 Treatment System was the first device available for cryoablation of fibroadenomas. Since then, our system has been used to successfully treat thousands of patients. The Visica 2 Treatment System is FDA-cleared for the ablation of cancerous or malignant tissue and benign tumors. At Sanarus, we develop innovative solutions for the nonsurgical treatment of breast tumors. We are headquartered in Pleasanton, CA, and all our products are manufactured in the USA. Find out more at http://www.sanarus.com ABOUT SUSAN G. KOMEN SAN DIEGO®: Since its inception in 1995, Komen San Diego has granted more than $18 million to research and local non-profits who provide everything from free diagnostic mammograms, meal delivery, temporary financial aid, transportation and more. Seventy-five percent of every dollar raised in San Diego stays in San Diego County to fund breast health services for uninsured and underinsured women and their families. The remaining 25 percent funds international breast cancer research. In fact, next to the U.S. government, Susan G. Komen® is the largest funder of breast cancer research in the world. For more information, please visit http://www.komensandiego.org. Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

This might be the ultimate do-it-yourself project: Doctors are testing a device that would let women do part of their own breast reconstruction at home. It's aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control - something cancer often takes away. More than 100,000 women each year in the United States have surgery to remove a cancerous breast, and many of them choose reconstruction with an implant. To make room for a permanent one, many of them get a tissue expander, a temporary pouch that is gradually enlarged with saline to stretch the remaining skin and muscle. This means trips to the doctor every week or two for several months for injections of saline into the pouch, which can be a painful ordeal. "We would put as much saline as we could until basically the patient would say, 'I can't stand it anymore,'" said Dr. Daniel Jacobs, a Kaiser Permanente plastic surgeon in San Jose, California. While biking home one day, Jacobs had an idea: Why couldn't a tiny can of compressed gas, like the one he carries to fix a flat tire, be used to let women inflate their own tissue expanders, a little each day so there is less stretching at a time and less pain? He helped found a company - AirXpanders Inc. of Palo Alto, California - to develop the device, called AeroForm. It's sold in Australia, approved in Europe and under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Its use requires no special training, wires or tubes - just a palm-sized remote control that activates a tiny cartridge inside the pouch to pump gas, up to three times a day according to how the woman feels. In a company-sponsored study of 150 women, AeroForm patients finished tissue expansion in half the time and were able to get implants a month sooner than others who had the usual saline treatments, said the study leader, Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman, a plastic surgeon at Columbia University Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. "My patients love it," he said. When some women who agreed to be in the study learned they had been assigned to get the saline device for comparison, "I had one who started crying, and other women said, 'please Dr. Ascherman, can't you change it?'" he said. There was no difference in rates of side-effects such as infections, but seven of the air expanders malfunctioned versus only one saline one, Ascherman said. The device was tweaked to fix the problem, he said. "It's a really interesting concept," said one outside expert, Dr. Deanna Attai, a University of California at Los Angeles surgeon who is a past president of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. "Giving the patient a sense of control is very psychologically important," because many women feel robbed of that, Attai said. "To a patient that's going through cancer treatment that could be a big deal." Dr. Susan E. Downey, a Los Angeles plastic surgeon who used the AeroForm on two patients in the study, said: "I think it will make life easier for a lot of people." It did for 35-year-old Luincys Fernandez, a high school chemistry teacher who lives in Bogota, New Jersey, and teaches in New York. She was diagnosed with breast cancer a year ago, when pregnant with her second son, and used the AeroForm as part of the study. "I really, really liked it," she said. She carried the remote control in her purse and completed the tissue expansion in just 18 days. "It did not interrupt any of my daily activities. I could go back to normal. I could see the results right away and I could see where I wanted it to go" in terms of size and appearance, she said. The device comes in three sizes. Women can choose the amount of inflation up to a point, limited by how much tissue is left and how far the device can expand. Once fully expanded, the device is removed and replaced with a breast implant. In Australia, AeroForm costs more than saline expanders but requires fewer office visits, so costs are not directly comparable. In the U.S., tissue expansion generally is reimbursed at a flat rate that is part of breast reconstruction, and AeroForm's impact on this cost - if the device wins FDA approval - is not clear.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

This might be the ultimate do-it-yourself project: Doctors are testing a device that would let women do part of their own breast reconstruction at home. It's aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control — something cancer often takes away. More than 100,000 women each year in the United States have surgery to remove a cancerous breast, and many of them choose reconstruction with an implant. To make room for a permanent one, many of them get a tissue expander, a temporary pouch that is gradually enlarged with saline to stretch the remaining skin and muscle. This means trips to the doctor every week or two for several months for injections of saline into the pouch, which can be a painful ordeal. "We would put as much saline as we could until basically the patient would say, 'I can't stand it anymore,'" said Dr. Daniel Jacobs, a Kaiser Permanente plastic surgeon in San Jose, California. While biking home one day, Jacobs had an idea: Why couldn't a tiny can of compressed gas, like the one he carries to fix a flat tire, be used to let women inflate their own tissue expanders, a little each day so there is less stretching at a time and less pain? He helped found a company — AirXpanders Inc. of Palo Alto, California — to develop the device, called AeroForm. It's sold in Australia, approved in Europe and under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Its use requires no special training, wires or tubes — just a palm-sized remote control that activates a tiny cartridge inside the pouch to pump gas, up to three times a day according to how the woman feels. In a company-sponsored study of 150 women, AeroForm patients finished tissue expansion in half the time and were able to get implants a month sooner than others who had the usual saline treatments, said the study leader, Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman, a plastic surgeon at Columbia University Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. "My patients love it," he said. When some women who agreed to be in the study learned they had been assigned to get the saline device for comparison, "I had one who started crying, and other women said, 'please Dr. Ascherman, can't you change it?'" he said. There was no difference in rates of side-effects such as infections, but seven of the air expanders malfunctioned versus only one saline one, Ascherman said. The device was tweaked to fix the problem, he said. "It's a really interesting concept," said one outside expert, Dr. Deanna Attai, a University of California at Los Angeles surgeon who is a past president of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. "Giving the patient a sense of control is very psychologically important," because many women feel robbed of that, Attai said. "To a patient that's going through cancer treatment that could be a big deal." Dr. Susan E. Downey, a Los Angeles plastic surgeon who used the AeroForm on two patients in the study, said: "I think it will make life easier for a lot of people." It did for 35-year-old Luincys Fernandez, a high school chemistry teacher who lives in Bogota, New Jersey, and teaches in New York. She was diagnosed with breast cancer a year ago, when pregnant with her second son, and used the AeroForm as part of the study. "I really, really liked it," she said. She carried the remote control in her purse and completed the tissue expansion in just 18 days. "It did not interrupt any of my daily activities. I could go back to normal. I could see the results right away and I could see where I wanted it to go" in terms of size and appearance, she said. The device comes in three sizes. Women can choose the amount of inflation up to a point, limited by how much tissue is left and how far the device can expand. Once fully expanded, the device is removed and replaced with a breast implant. In Australia, AeroForm costs more than saline expanders but requires fewer office visits, so costs are not directly comparable. In the U.S., tissue expansion generally is reimbursed at a flat rate that is part of breast reconstruction, and AeroForm's impact on this cost — if the device wins FDA approval — is not clear.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Global Breast Health & Wellness Center, founded by Dr. April Speed, announced it has expanded its cryoablation treatment of fibroadenoma to include early stage breast cancer with the Visica® 2 Treatment System. Developed by Sanarus Technologies, the Visica 2 Treatment System is a cryoablation device that uses extreme cold liquid nitrogen (cryo) to destroy tissue (ablation). The device destroys the tumor by freezing and damaging the adjacent vasculature that fuels tumor growth. Dr. April L. Speed is board-certified by the American College of Surgeons and is a member of the American Society of Breast Surgeons, the Society of Surgical Oncology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Dr. Speed was recognized by her peers and awarded the ASCO National Diversity in Oncology Award in 2009. Cryoablation—also referred to as tumor freezing—is a minimally invasive procedure done under ultrasound guidance in the doctor’s office or radiology suite. After injection of local anesthesia, a thin probe is inserted through the skin directly into the tumor. Liquid nitrogen is pumped into the probe to form an “ice ball” around the lesion. Freezing destroys the tumor cells, which are then reabsorbed by the body over time. The procedure can be done in less than an hour with most patients reporting minimal discomfort and a resumption of normal activity right away. Little, if any, visible scarring occurs. Because no breast tissue is removed during the procedure, the natural shape of the breast is maintained. ”I’ve been providing cryoablation for the treatment of fibroadenomas since 2015 and have obtained very good results” said Dr. Speed. “Those results coupled with the publication of the National Cancer Institute Z1072 Trial have truly encouraged me to expand my practice to offer cryoablation for early stage breast cancer tumors.” In a 5-year multicenter study funded by the National Cancer Institute and sponsored by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, cryoablation with the Visica 2 Treatment System was shown to be 100% effective for complete ablation of invasive ductal breast cancer tumors <1.0 cm. The Visica 2 Treatment System was the exclusive device used in the Z1072 study and showed cryoablation to be effective in 92% of the targeted lesions. Results from this breast cancer study (ACOSOG Z1072), which included a 5-year follow-up, were published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology. Dr. Speed further explained that “In November 2016, I opened my new state of the art facility located in Buckhead to provide Greater Atlanta with a comprehensive, 100% dedicated, breast surgery practice. Cryoablation is one of our primary treatment options for our patients because it provides an opportunity for women to have cutting edge therapy with dignity and detail performed in a serene, patient-centered environment. It also gives women the benefit of a minimally invasive procedure with little to no scarring, downtime, or discomfort.” Dr. Speed recently discussed cryoablation and other breast cancer related topics on Atlanta Business RadioX. She discussed the technology of cryoablation, who would qualify as a patient, and why she has chosen to offer cryoablation for the treatment of early stage breast cancer lesions. She has also been featured on CentricTV. Cryoablation with the Visica 2 Treatment System is a nonsurgical option for patients that have been diagnosed early stage breast tumor that is less than 4 cm in diameter, is visible on sonogram and has been confirmed with a biopsy. About Global Breast Health & Wellness Center Dr. Speed serves on several boards, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Greater Atlanta Affiliate, and the Georgia Perimeter College. She's a highly sought-after speaker, author, consultant and lecturer on breast cancer and breast health. Dr. Speed has recently embarked upon an exciting venture of private practice in two convenient locations, Buckhead and Conyers, and welcomes all of her previous patients and new patients alike to continue to be a part of this amazing journey of transformation from your Breast Health to your Best Health℠. Let's treat it, beat it, move on!℠ To contact Dr. Speed go http://www.draprilspeed.com or call 678.210.2846 About Sanarus Technologies In 2001, the Visica® 2 Treatment System was the first available for cryoablation of fibroadenomas. Since then, our system has been used to successfully treat thousands of patients. The Visica 2 Treatment System is FDA-cleared for the ablation of cancerous or malignant tissue and benign tumors. At Sanarus, we develop innovative solutions for the nonsurgical treatment of breast tumors. We are headquartered in Pleasanton, CA, and all of our products are manufactured in the USA. Find out more at http://www.sanarus.com

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