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News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Join us in Chicago or register for virtual newsroom access BETHESDA, Md., Feb. 16, 2017 - World-renowned scientists will present pioneering research and discuss key issues affecting the life sciences at the 2017 Experimental Biology meeting (EB 2017), the premier annual meeting of six scientific societies in Chicago to be held April 22-26. Register for a free onsite press pass to see these speakers in person. Or, stay up to date on all the exciting research news at EB 2017 through the new EB Virtual Newsroom, your one-stop shop for press releases, meeting information and blog posts. EB 2017 will feature the latest advances in anatomy, biochemistry and molecular biology, investigative pathology, nutrition, pharmacology and physiology. This year's speaker line-up includes presentations from the following leading scientists: Want to hear these speakers and follow hundreds of other research announcements at EB 2017? Here are your next steps: Learn More about the Virtual Newsroom: Get press releases, multimedia & news tips online View the Preliminary Program: Get the latest information on planned scientific sessions & events EB sponsoring societies include the American Association of Anatomists, American Physiological Society, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, American Society for Investigative Pathology, American Society for Nutrition and American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics.


Ohlhorst S.D.,American Society for Nutrition | Russell R.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | Russell R.,Tufts University | Bier D.,Baylor College of Medicine | And 9 more authors.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2013

Proper nutrition offers one of the most effective and least costly ways to decrease the burden of many diseases and their associated risk factors, including obesity. Nutrition research holds the key to increasing our understanding of the causes of obesity and its related comorbidities and thus holds promise to markedly influence global health and economies. After outreach to 75 thought leaders, the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) convened a Working Group to identify the nutrition research needs whose advancement will have the greatest projected impact on the future health and well-being of global populations. ASN's Nutrition Research Needs focus on the following high priority areas: 1) variability in individual responses to diet and foods; 2) healthy growth, development, and reproduction; 3) health maintenance; 4) medical management; 5) nutrition-related behaviors; and 6) food supply/environment. ASN hopes the Nutrition Research Needs will prompt collaboration among scientists across all disciplines to advance this challenging research agenda given the high potential for translation and impact on public health. Furthermore, ASN hopes the findings from the Nutrition Research Needs will stimulate the development and adoption of new and innovative strategies that can be applied toward the prevention and treatment of nutrition-related diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of nutrition research requires stakeholders with differing areas of expertise to collaborate on multifaceted approaches to establish the evidencebased nutrition guidance and policies that will lead to better health for the global population. In addition to the identified research needs, ASN also identified 5 tools that are critical to the advancement of the Nutrition Research Needs: 1) omics, 2) bioinformatics, 3) databases, 4) biomarkers, and 5) cost-effectiveness analysis. © 2013 American Society for Nutrition.


Alexander N.,Media Concerns | Rowe S.,SR Strategy LLC | Brackett R.E.,Illinois Institute of Technology | Burton-Freeman B.,Illinois Institute of Technology | And 6 more authors.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2015

Officers and other representatives of more than a dozen food-, nutrition-, and health-related scientific societies and organizations, food industry scientists, and staff of the USDA, the CDC, the Food and Drug Administration, and the NIH convened on 8 December 2014 in Washington, DC, to reach a consensus among individuals participating on guiding principles for the development of research-oriented, foodand nutrition-related public-private partnerships. During the daylong working meeting, participants discussed and revised 12 previously published guidelines to ensure integrity in the conduct of food and nutrition research collaborations among public, nonprofit, and private sectors. They agreed to reconvene periodically to reassess the public-private partnership principles. This article presents the guiding principles and potential benefits, outlines key discussion points, and articulates points of agreement and reservation. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.


Miyazawa K.,Miyazawa Clinic | Challem J.,American Society for Nutrition
Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine | Year: 2015

Adverse reactions to food, such as allergies or intolerances, are relatively common. Current medical practice relies primarily on testing for immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactions to identify specific food allergies. However, IgE is involved in acute allergic reactions, and it has limited usefulness f or diagnosing chronic non-acute food allergies. In contrast, immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactions take longer to develop and are not usually acute. IgG levels may increase as a consequence of intestinal permeability. For example, gliadin (found in gluten) breaks down tight junctions (TJs), which are protein complexes that line the GI tract. When TJs break down, intestinal permeability (leaky gut syndrome) increases, allowing incompletely digested proteins to enter the bloodstream and trigger an IgG-based autoimmune reaction. Not surprisingly, IgG levels are often elevated in patients with celiac disease and non-celiacgluten sensitivity. Other diseases, including mood disorders and irritable bowel syndrome, also appear related to IgG-mediatedfood reactions. While IgG testing may be controversial, it remains an important tool for identifying chronic, non-acute food allergies.


Ohlhorst S.D.,American Society for Nutrition | Slavin M.,George Mason University | Bhide J.M.,Institute of Technologists | Bugusu B.,Purdue University
Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety | Year: 2012

The Micronutrient Initiative (MI) issued the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) a project to assess the extent to which iodized salt is used in processed foods, as well as food processors' level of knowledge on iodine nutrition. Iodine is an essential micronutrient required by the body that is found in a limited number of foods, thus many individuals require additional sources of iodine to meet their daily requirement. Without these additional sources, a range of disorders referred to as iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), including mental impairment, may become present, with over 2 billion people worldwide at risk due to insufficient iodine nutrition. IDD is especially damaging during the early stages of pregnancy and in early childhood. In their most severe form, IDD includes cretinism, stillbirth, and miscarriage, and increased infant mortality. Since 1994 the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) have recommended universal salt iodization (USI) as a safe, cost-effective, and sustainable strategy to ensure sufficient intake of iodine by all individuals. However, USI has in practice tended to focus only on table salt and not all salt destined for human consumption. Recent trends, particularly in industrialized countries, show that individuals are consuming the majority of their salt through processed foods, in which iodized salt is generally not used, rather than through iodized table salt. Additionally, recent initiatives to encourage reduced sodium consumption have prompted many consumers to reduce their intake of iodized table salt. While these trends in sodium consumption are more frequently observed in industrialized countries, they are expanding into many developing countries where iodine deficiency is also a concern. Thus countries which focus on iodization of table salt alone may not achieve optimal iodine nutrition of their population. This report provides an overview of the 2 Phases of this project. Phase I was to conduct an environmental scan/desk review of processed food consumption patterns in 39 countries selected by MI (see Table 1). Phase II was to conduct an electronic survey of food processors and detailed telephone interviews with a small sample of select company representatives from 16 countries (see Table 2). Per the scope of work, IFT conducted a desk review to determine the types and level of processed food consumption in the 39 countries of interest, as well as to identify suppliers of the major processed foods consumed and the use of salt as an ingredient in those products. Whenever possible, IFT also gathered information on the sodium content of widely consumed processed foods and the sources of salt currently used in these products; the types of processed foods and extent to which they are consumed by different socioeconomic groups; if iodized salt was used in processed foods; and whether or not there are policies in place to influence dietary salt reduction and how these efforts are implemented. For Phase II, IFT reached out to food company representatives to determine their use of iodized salt in processed food products; their sources of salt; their awareness of iodine nutrition and salt as a fortification vehicle; and their interest in learning more about salt iodization. For the purposes of this project, processed foods are considered to be all food products that have undergone a change of character or been altered from their original form. 1- Preselected countries (from MI) for Phase I of the iodized salt in processed foods project. Countries with heavy Countries with high Countries with Latin American European burden for IDD burden for IDD opportunity to progress countries countries India Russia Senegal Chile United Kingdom Pakistan Afghanistan Ghana Argentina Ireland Ethiopia United Republic of Tanzania Ukraine Mexico Finland China Democratic Republic of Congo Kenya Bolivia Netherlands Sudan Iraq Mozambique Uruguay Australia Indonesia Bangladesh Niger New Zealand Philippines Yemen Egypt Angola Haiti Turkey South Africa Brazil Nigeria Nepal 2- Preselected countries (from MI) for Phase II of the iodized salt in process foods project. Australia Kenya Bangladesh Mexico Bolivia Nigeria China Pakistan Egypt Russia Ghana Senegal India South Africa Indonesia United Kingdom To complete the desk review, IFT conducted literature searches and Internet reviews for each of the 39 countries of interest from May to September 2010. IFT reached out to its members with expertise in the countries of interest and 3rd parties such as government agencies, food companies, salt suppliers, and nongovernmental organizations to gain contacts and information. The acquisition of literature or access to databases or other sources of information which are not freely available was limited. For Phase II, IFT sent an electronic survey to over 800 individuals from all 16 countries in October 2010. IFT reached out to its members and other contacts with expertise in the countries of interest, which included food companies and salt suppliers who were asked to complete the electronic survey, but also 3rd parties, such as academics, government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and so on, who were asked to pass the survey along to their food industry contacts. Outreach included over 15 multinational food companies. The survey responses IFT received were limited; however, IFT made a substantial effort to obtain useful information for each country. IFT also used survey responses and personal e-mail communications to locate 10 food company representatives to participate in telephone interviews to gain more detailed information. Many of the 39 countries reviewed struggle with food insecurity, thus it was generally difficult to find food consumption data for these impoverished nations, particularly data on processed food consumption. Nationwide food consumption data were helpful to better understand processed food consumption for those countries that collected it; however, developing countries often lack the resources for such a large undertaking. Smaller, published academic studies were most useful in identifying types of foods that may be available in the different locales within a country, at times including minimally processed foods. IFT found that residents in many of the developing countries typically consume minimally processed foods such as bread and cheese, but that they do not frequently consume what are considered processed foods in "Western" society (packaged, prepared foods). Although processed foods may be available, consumption often differs based on income and region in the country. The more affluent and urban areas of countries appear more able to purchase processed foods, and therefore more likely to have a higher consumption rate. A pattern of processed food consumption or lack thereof did not present itself for the various country categories assigned to the 39 countries evaluated. Whether the country has a heavy or high IDD burden or an opportunity to progress did not correlate with the consumption of processed foods in that country. IDD is present in both developed and developing countries, and countries from each of these categories may or may not have processed foods available. Some countries with the heaviest burden for IDD may also have many processed foods available such as China, while another country with high IDD does not appear to have even minimally processed foods readily available. However, the majority of the European countries and Latin American countries identified on the list do have processed foods more readily available than some other countries identified, although not all are prepared with iodized salt. Many of the developing nations reviewed have the highest prevalence for IDD, often due to the high level of food insecurity. IDD is more closely linked to food insecure populations, which are also often low-income and rural populations, who lack access to food, including food that may have been prepared with iodized salt. Some of the developing countries have enacted legislation to combat high rates of IDD and require iodization of all salt to be consumed; however, they also often lack regulatory infrastructure and therefore lack effective methods to monitor and enforce salt iodization. For this reason, it appears that even when legislation and other efforts have been enacted, they are not comprehensively implemented. Future research needs surrounding iodine use in processed foods include the need for nationwide food consumption data and additional food science research. Nationwide food consumption data are most helpful to determine processed food consumption; however, developing countries often lack the resources for such a large undertaking. Nationwide food consumption information can also reveal sources of salt intake in the diet and help to determine vehicle(s) for iodized salt delivery. Food science research determines the amount of iodine that should be added to a product to still meet standards after food processing and time spent on a store or consumer's shelf, and to ensure that iodization does not impact the taste or other qualities of food products. Survey and telephone respondents reported potential challenges when using iodized salt in food products, including: trade barriers; increased costs; lack of resources and technical capability; lack of enforcement; instability of iodine; potential equipment and process overhauls; competing priorities; and consumer misconceptions. Salt suppliers also face challenges when iodizing salt in developing countries, as they may not have the technical capabilities, equipment, or resources to do so. The survey and telephone respondents indicate that food companies are willing to use iodized salt in food products; however, the use of iodized salt in food products may need to be mandated by law and effectively. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists ®.


Ohlhorst S.D.,American Society for Nutrition
Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.) | Year: 2013

Proper nutrition offers one of the most effective and least costly ways to decrease the burden of many diseases and their associated risk factors, including obesity. Nutrition research holds the key to increasing our understanding of the causes of obesity and its related comorbidities and thus holds promise to markedly influence global health and economies. After outreach to 75 thought leaders, the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) convened a Working Group to identify the nutrition research needs whose advancement will have the greatest projected impact on the future health and well-being of global populations. ASN's Nutrition Research Needs focus on the following high priority areas: 1) variability in individual responses to diet and foods; 2) healthy growth, development, and reproduction; 3) health maintenance; 4) medical management; 5) nutrition-related behaviors; and 6) food supply/environment. ASN hopes the Nutrition Research Needs will prompt collaboration among scientists across all disciplines to advance this challenging research agenda given the high potential for translation and impact on public health. Furthermore, ASN hopes the findings from the Nutrition Research Needs will stimulate the development and adoption of new and innovative strategies that can be applied toward the prevention and treatment of nutrition-related diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of nutrition research requires stakeholders with differing areas of expertise to collaborate on multifaceted approaches to establish the evidence-based nutrition guidance and policies that will lead to better health for the global population. In addition to the identified research needs, ASN also identified 5 tools that are critical to the advancement of the Nutrition Research Needs: 1) omics, 2) bioinformatics, 3) databases, 4) biomarkers, and 5) cost-effectiveness analysis.


Lands B.,American Society for Nutrition | Lands B.,College Park
Drug Safety | Year: 2016

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a preventable disease, which combines two general processes: chronic vascular inflammation and acute thrombosis. Both are amplified with positive feedback signals by n-6 eicosanoids derived from food-based n-6 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-6 HUFA). This amplification is lessened by competing actions of n-3 HUFA. Death results from fatal interactions of the vascular wall with platelets and clotting proteins. The benefits of fish oil interventions are confounded by complex details in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse events, timescale factors, topology, financial incentives and people’s sense of cause and effect. Two basic aspects of n-3 HUFA that are overlooked in CVD dynamics are saturable, hyperbolic responses of the enzymes continually supplying n-6 HUFA and hard-to-control positive feedback receptor signals by excessive n-6 HUFA–based mediators. Multiple feedback loops in inflammation and thrombosis have diverse mediators, and reducing one mediator that occurs above its rate-limiting levels may not reduce the pathophysiology. Clinicians have developed some successful interventions that decrease CVD deaths in the form of secondary prevention. However, the current high CVD prevalence in the USA remains unchanged, and successful primary prevention of CVD remains uncertain. This review weighs the available evidence to help clinicians, the biomedical community and the public put the use of fish oil supplements into a balanced perspective. © 2016 The Author(s)


PubMed | American Society for Nutrition
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Drug safety | Year: 2016

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a preventable disease, which combines two general processes: chronic vascular inflammation and acute thrombosis. Both are amplified with positive feedback signals by n-6 eicosanoids derived from food-based n-6 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-6 HUFA). This amplification is lessened by competing actions of n-3 HUFA. Death results from fatal interactions of the vascular wall with platelets and clotting proteins. The benefits of fish oil interventions are confounded by complex details in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse events, timescale factors, topology, financial incentives and peoples sense of cause and effect. Two basic aspects of n-3 HUFA that are overlooked in CVD dynamics are saturable, hyperbolic responses of the enzymes continually supplying n-6 HUFA and hard-to-control positive feedback receptor signals by excessive n-6 HUFA-based mediators. Multiple feedback loops in inflammation and thrombosis have diverse mediators, and reducing one mediator that occurs above its rate-limiting levels may not reduce the pathophysiology. Clinicians have developed some successful interventions that decrease CVD deaths in the form of secondary prevention. However, the current high CVD prevalence in the USA remains unchanged, and successful primary prevention of CVD remains uncertain. This review weighs the available evidence to help clinicians, the biomedical community and the public put the use of fish oil supplements into a balanced perspective.


Trademark
American Society For Nutrition | Date: 2011-05-17

Printed publications, namely, journals in the field of nutrition and nutrition research. Providing online publications in the nature of journals in the field of nutrition and nutrition research.


PubMed | American Society for Nutrition
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The American journal of clinical nutrition | Year: 2013

Proper nutrition offers one of the most effective and least costly ways to decrease the burden of many diseases and their associated risk factors, including obesity. Nutrition research holds the key to increasing our understanding of the causes of obesity and its related comorbidities and thus holds promise to markedly influence global health and economies. After outreach to 75 thought leaders, the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) convened a Working Group to identify the nutrition research needs whose advancement will have the greatest projected impact on the future health and well-being of global populations. ASNs Nutrition Research Needs focus on the following high priority areas: 1) variability in individual responses to diet and foods; 2) healthy growth, development, and reproduction; 3) health maintenance; 4) medical management; 5) nutrition-related behaviors; and 6) food supply/environment. ASN hopes the Nutrition Research Needs will prompt collaboration among scientists across all disciplines to advance this challenging research agenda given the high potential for translation and impact on public health. Furthermore, ASN hopes the findings from the Nutrition Research Needs will stimulate the development and adoption of new and innovative strategies that can be applied toward the prevention and treatment of nutrition-related diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of nutrition research requires stakeholders with differing areas of expertise to collaborate on multifaceted approaches to establish the evidence-based nutrition guidance and policies that will lead to better health for the global population. In addition to the identified research needs, ASN also identified 5 tools that are critical to the advancement of the Nutrition Research Needs: 1) omics, 2) bioinformatics, 3) databases, 4) biomarkers, and 5) cost-effectiveness analysis.

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