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Receive press releases from American Science and Technology: By Email University of Malaga Researchers Collaborate with AST to Develop New Lignin-Based Products AST to send multiple shipments of its Organosolv lignin for continued product development efforts. Wausau, WI, December 07, 2016 --( Led by professors Tomás Cordero Alcántara and José Rodríguez Mirasol, TERMA Group has been working exclusively on lignocellulosic biomass materials to obtain value added materials. The promising findings from their initial efforts led to the partnership with American Science and Technology (AST), who will supply TERMA Group with multiple shipments of Organosolv lignin to further advance their product development activities. TERMA Group will use AST’s Organosolv lignin to prepare porous carbon materials in different structures or conformations (powder, nanofibers, monoliths) to use them as adsorbents or as catalysts in different applications (polluted stream treatment, reactions within the framework of a biorefinery, biofuels, electrodes for supercapacitor devices, etc.) “Although Organosolv lignin is nothing new, it was only after the recent scale up of AST’s biorefinery pilot plant (located in Wausau, WI) that this material became available in mass quantities for various research and product development efforts,” said Dr. Ali Manesh, President of AST. “And as one of the only companies that can produce pure lignin from the Organosolv process in large quantities, we feel it is our obligation to provide this product to the research communities and give them the opportunity to play a key role in the worldwide effort to valorize this second most abundant natural polymer.” Currently, AST’s Organosolv lignin is being used by several research teams at various universities, including University of Washington, Mississippi State University, University of Wisconsin, University of Minnesota, and Washington State University, for various research projects. The team at University of Wisconsin-Platteville successfully coextruded AST’s Organosolv lignin with other polymers to create new resins that were then used to produce polymeric parts via injection molding. American Science and Technology is a full service shared piloting facility available to industry, and is dedicated to helping our clients develop innovative biorefinery and chemical technologies to convert lignocellulosic biomass into high-value, bio-based chemicals and products. The AST facility operates from laboratory level to multi-ton scale and is equipped with a wide range of material handling and biomass processing equipment to provide a unique opportunity for collaboration to accelerate the advancement of the bio-based economy. During the past 10 years, AST scientists and engineers have also developed a patented Organosolv pulping process that has shown to increase the efficiency and profitability of pulp and paper production by converting virtually all of the incoming lignocellulosic biomass to high-value products. AST’s Organosolv pulp not only produces quality pulp, but also produces pure lignin and organic solvents, such as butyl acetate and furfural. TERMA group, from the University of Málaga, has been involved on studies related to the conversion of different biomass waste by thermochemical processes (pyrolysis and gasification, catalysed or not) for the production of bio-gas, bio-liquids or bio-solids (activated carbons and chars) at laboratory and pilot plant scale. The group also has extensive experience in the synthesis of nanoporous carbons with different structures and morphologies that have been successfully used as adsorbents for the treatment of gas and liquid polluted streams and as catalysts in the conversion of bioalcohols to olefins, in the framework of biorefineries, and as catalyst supports in fine chemicals production and in partial oxidation of hydrocarbons. The group has also led research on the use of electrospinning/electrospray techniques for the preparation of carbon-derived submicron fibers (solid and hollow) and on the synthesis of hierarchical porous carbons. Wausau, WI, December 07, 2016 --( PR.com )-- American Science and Technology (AST), a sustainable technology company, has teamed up with TERMA Group, a team of Waste and Environmental Technology researchers at the University of Malaga, in Spain, to continue efforts on the development of new lignin-based products.Led by professors Tomás Cordero Alcántara and José Rodríguez Mirasol, TERMA Group has been working exclusively on lignocellulosic biomass materials to obtain value added materials. The promising findings from their initial efforts led to the partnership with American Science and Technology (AST), who will supply TERMA Group with multiple shipments of Organosolv lignin to further advance their product development activities.TERMA Group will use AST’s Organosolv lignin to prepare porous carbon materials in different structures or conformations (powder, nanofibers, monoliths) to use them as adsorbents or as catalysts in different applications (polluted stream treatment, reactions within the framework of a biorefinery, biofuels, electrodes for supercapacitor devices, etc.)“Although Organosolv lignin is nothing new, it was only after the recent scale up of AST’s biorefinery pilot plant (located in Wausau, WI) that this material became available in mass quantities for various research and product development efforts,” said Dr. Ali Manesh, President of AST. “And as one of the only companies that can produce pure lignin from the Organosolv process in large quantities, we feel it is our obligation to provide this product to the research communities and give them the opportunity to play a key role in the worldwide effort to valorize this second most abundant natural polymer.”Currently, AST’s Organosolv lignin is being used by several research teams at various universities, including University of Washington, Mississippi State University, University of Wisconsin, University of Minnesota, and Washington State University, for various research projects. The team at University of Wisconsin-Platteville successfully coextruded AST’s Organosolv lignin with other polymers to create new resins that were then used to produce polymeric parts via injection molding.American Science and Technology is a full service shared piloting facility available to industry, and is dedicated to helping our clients develop innovative biorefinery and chemical technologies to convert lignocellulosic biomass into high-value, bio-based chemicals and products. The AST facility operates from laboratory level to multi-ton scale and is equipped with a wide range of material handling and biomass processing equipment to provide a unique opportunity for collaboration to accelerate the advancement of the bio-based economy. During the past 10 years, AST scientists and engineers have also developed a patented Organosolv pulping process that has shown to increase the efficiency and profitability of pulp and paper production by converting virtually all of the incoming lignocellulosic biomass to high-value products. AST’s Organosolv pulp not only produces quality pulp, but also produces pure lignin and organic solvents, such as butyl acetate and furfural.TERMA group, from the University of Málaga, has been involved on studies related to the conversion of different biomass waste by thermochemical processes (pyrolysis and gasification, catalysed or not) for the production of bio-gas, bio-liquids or bio-solids (activated carbons and chars) at laboratory and pilot plant scale. The group also has extensive experience in the synthesis of nanoporous carbons with different structures and morphologies that have been successfully used as adsorbents for the treatment of gas and liquid polluted streams and as catalysts in the conversion of bioalcohols to olefins, in the framework of biorefineries, and as catalyst supports in fine chemicals production and in partial oxidation of hydrocarbons. The group has also led research on the use of electrospinning/electrospray techniques for the preparation of carbon-derived submicron fibers (solid and hollow) and on the synthesis of hierarchical porous carbons. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from American Science and Technology


Hill M.,University of Geneva | Engle N.L.,American Science and Technology
Environmental Policy and Governance | Year: 2013

Climate variability and climate change impacts on hydrological conditions prescribe the need to better understand favourable conditions for developing and mobilising adaptive capacity. This paper presents new cases to the body of evidence on adaptive capacity in the context of institutional arrangements for water management. It aims to contribute insights into the challenges of developing approaches across governance scales for dealing with climate variability and climate change impacts. The different case studies explored in this article represent an exploration of the challenges across temporal and spatial scales in relation to the adaptive capacity of water governance to hydro-climatic stresses. The studies use a suite of governance related indicators to explore adaptive capacity in relation to past extreme hydrological events. Analysis is based on qualitative open ended interviews and questionnaires. Results indicate that tensions persist in developing proactive capacity and mobilising reactive capacity at different scales of governance to different scales of change. Findings support the increasing recognition in the literature for top down and bottom up approaches to be better balanced in efforts to improve resilience to climate variability and change. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.


Kondamudi N.,University of Nevada, Reno | Mohapatra S.K.,American Science and Technology | Misra M.,University of Nevada, Reno
Applied Catalysis A: General | Year: 2011

Biodiesel synthesis from waste vegetable oils, restaurant grease and poultry fat gained industrial importance compared to the high priced, food based vegetable oils. The major drawback of waste streams is the free fatty acid (FFA) content, which is difficult to convert into biodiesel. This paper describes synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of Quntinite-3T, a bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst that converts FFA and triglycerides (TGs) simultaneously into biodiesel. The catalyst is prepared by sol-gel process and is characterized by XRD, SEM, and HR-TEM. The catalyst is tested for soy, canola, coffee and waste vegetable oils with variable amounts of FFAs (0-30 wt%). 1H NMR, HPLC, GC-MS were used for analyzing the reaction products. The catalyst successfully converted both FFA and TGs in a single step batch reactor. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Barfield W.L.,American Science and Technology
Academic Medicine | Year: 2016

Women continue to face unique barriers in the biomedical workforce that affect their advancement and retention in this field. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) formed the Working Group on Women in Biomedical Careers to address these issues. Through the efforts of the working group, the NIH funded 14 research grants to identify barriers or to develop and/or test interventions to support women in the biomedical workforce. The grantees that were funded through this endeavor later established the grassroots Research Partnership on Women in Biomedical Careers, and they continue to conduct research and disseminate information on the state of women in academic medicine. This Commentary explores the themes introduced in a collection of articles organized by the research partnership and published in this issue of Academic Medicine. The authors highlight the role that government plays in the advancement of women in academic medicine and highlight the findings put forward in this collection. © 2016 by the Association of American Medical Colleges


The likely intensification of extreme droughts from climate change in many regions across the United States has increased interest amongst researchers and water managers to understand not only the magnitude of drought impacts and their consequences on water resources, but also what they can do to prevent, respond to, and adapt to these impacts. Building and mobilizing 'adaptive capacity' can help in this pursuit. Researchers anticipate that drought preparedness measures will increase adaptive capacity, but there has been minimal testing of this and other assumptions about the governance and institutional determinants of adaptive capacity. This paper draws from recent extreme droughts in Arizona and Georgia to empirically assess adaptive capacity across spatial and temporal scales. It combines quantitative and qualitative methodologies to identify a handful of heuristics for increasing adaptive capacity of water management to extreme droughts and climate change, and also highlights potential tradeoffs in building and mobilizing adaptive capacity across space and time. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Patent
American Science and Technology | Date: 2013-02-11

An organosolv process for producing bio-products by decomposing lignocellulosic materials comprises providing an initial lignin solvent with water, an acid, and a lignin dissolving chemical comprising at least one of an organic ester, butyl acetate, an organic furan, and furfural. The process also includes placing the lignin solvent in contact with a biomass to form a circulation solvent, and recycling at least a portion of the circulation solvent by circulating the circulation solvent back into contact with the biomass. The circulating of the circulation solvent occurs for a period of time, after which, the process then includes separating material such as chemicals and lignin from the circulation solvent. The chemicals can be recycled as new solvent or sold while lignin can be used as natural and renewable colorant for polymers such as poly lactic acid.


An oxygen assisted Organosolv process for a more efficient delignification and producing bio-products by decomposing lignocellulosic materials comprises providing a lignin solvent with water, an acid, an oxidant and one or more lignin dissolving chemicals. The process also includes placing biomass in contact with oxidant, acid, water, the lignin solvent in any order or combined to form a recyclable solvent, and recycling at least a portion of the recyclable solvent by circulating the recyclable solvent back into contact with the biomass. The circulating of the recyclable solvent occurs for a period of time, during which, acid and oxidant may be added if necessary as they may be consumed by the process, after which, the process then includes separating material such as chemicals and lignin from the recyclable solvent. The chemicals can be recycled as new lignin dissolving solvent or sold, while lignin can be used as natural and renewable colorant for polymers such as poly lactic acid, or mixed with other polymers as an additive and extruded or injected to consumable polymeric parts, or can be used and the natural source of renewable aromatics. Application of an oxidant will help the overall fractionation process by changing the chemical characteristics of the lignin and therefore allows more lignin to be removed from biomass. At the end, the lignin is separated from the lignin dissolving solvent by a separation process to also reclaim the lignin dissolving solvent for the next fractionation process.


Patent
American Science and Technology | Date: 2011-05-20

An energy scavenging power system and method may include an energy conversion system having at least one transducer configured to harvest energy, an energy management and storage system configured to store harvested energy; and a load regulation system configured to provide stored energy to power one or more low power-consumption loads. The energy management and storage system may include a start-up capacitor having a small capacitance to allow for quick charging and fast turn-on, a short term capacitor to provide energy to the load or loads once turned-on, and a long term capacitor having a large capacitance to provide for sustained energy delivery to the loads. The system also may include a common charging bus that receives energy from each transducer, conditioned if necessary, and which then determines the capacitor to which the energy should be delivered.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.77K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: In an effort to improve nondestructive inspections (NDI), American Science & Technology (AST) is developing wireless capability for specific pieces of NDI equipment in the areas of eddy current and ultrasonic technologies. Traditionally, this equipment requires a cable connection from the host controller to the handheld probe. AST"s work would develop an attachment for the host controller as well as for the probe which would simulate the communication process achieved through a direct cable connection. This project is unique from other wireless adapters in that it would be specifically engineered to work with NDI equipment. Specific circuitry to drive NDI probes, high-speed wireless communication between controller and host, and integrated impedance-matching hardware would all be incorporated to ensure the most accurate representation of wired communication. The major advantage to this system would be its ability to be incorporated into pre-existing equipment without the need for purchase of new, modified NDI equipment offering a cost-savings aspect over other approaches. BENEFIT: Wireless communication with the NDI equipment will result in eliminating the need to run NDI cables throughout an aircraft or engine; therefore, removing the possibility of the cables damaging the structure. This will also drastically improve NDI efficiencies by reducing inspection times. There will be no need for a technician to spend time running cables into tight and hazardous areas of an aircraft or engine. Third, a significant cost savings will occur since damaged cables will no longer need to be replaced. Furthermore, unlike the cables, the wireless communication device will be repairable should they become damaged. This technology will be easily transferrable to the airline industries where NDI is widely used. Locally, the technology can be applied to the Air National Guard fleet in Sioux Falls and to military aircraft stations at Ellsworth Air Force base in Rapid City, SD.


Epstein G.L.,American Science and Technology
Biosecurity and Bioterrorism | Year: 2012

The dual-use dilemma in the life sciences-that illicit applications draw on the same science and technology base as legitimate applications-makes it inherently difficult to control one without inhibiting the other. Since before the September 11 attacks, the science and security communities in the United States have struggled to develop governance processes that can simultaneously minimize the risk of misuse of the life sciences, promote their beneficial applications, and protect the public trust. What has become clear over that time is that while procedural steps can be specified for assessing and managing dual-use risks in the review of research proposals, oversight of ongoing research, and communication of research results, the actions or decisions to be taken at each of these steps to mitigate dual-use risk defy codification. Yet the stakes are too high to do nothing, or to be seen as doing nothing. The U.S. government should therefore adopt an oversight framework largely along the lines recommended by the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity almost 5 years ago-one that builds on existing processes, can gain buy-in from the scientific community, and can be implemented at modest cost (both direct and opportunity), while providing assurance that a considered and independent examination of dual-use risks is being applied. Without extraordinary visibility into the actions of those who would misuse biology, it may be impossible to know how well such an oversight system will actually succeed at mitigating misuse. But maintaining the public trust will require a system to be established in which reasonably foreseeable dual-use consequences of life science research are anticipated, evaluated, and addressed. © 2012 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

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