American Registry of Pathology

Camden, DE, United States

American Registry of Pathology

Camden, DE, United States
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Aboukhalid R.,Mohammed V University | Sturk-Andreaggi K.,American Registry of Pathology | Sturk-Andreaggi K.,Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory | Bouabdellah M.,Mohammed V University | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Legal Medicine | Year: 2013

In an effort to facilitate forensic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing in Morocco, high-quality control region sequences from 509 individuals were generated using a comprehensive processing and data review system. This large dataset of random samples from various Moroccan population groups (Arab speaking, Berber speaking, and Sahrawi speaking) exhibited a low random match probability (0.52 %) and a mean of pairwise comparisons of 13.24. The Moroccan mtDNA gene pool studied here was defined entirely by West Eurasian (58.15 %) and African haplogroups (41.85 %). © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BILLINGS, MT, February 16, 2017-- Dr. Guy Glenn has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Now retired, Dr. Glenn amassed five decades of practiced experience in both the health care and military fields. He served as a commissioned second lieutenant for the U.S. Army and completed a medical internship at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Additionally, he served as a resident in pathology at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center for four years. During the 1970s, Dr. Glenn advanced through the ranks of the U.S. Army, becoming a colonel in 1972. Also during the '70s, he took on the role of pathology demonstrator at Royal Army Medical College, and chief of the department of pathology at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center.Dr. Glenn's educational background consists of a Bachelor of Science from Denison University and an MD from the University of Cincinnati. A diplomate of the American Board of Pathology, Dr. Glenn has contributed his knowledge to many articles in professional journals. Throughout his career, he has published more than 25 professional papers and presented additional findings at meetings and seminars. He also wrote and assisted in the composition and publishing of multiple medical guidelines, as well as a chapter on urine chemistry quality control in the Clinical Laboratory Annual in 1983. In order to remain current with changes in his field, Dr. Glenn affiliates himself with the College of American Pathologists, for which he is a fellow, as well as the Midland Empire Health Association, the Society of Medical Consultants to the Armed Forces, and the American Registry of Pathology.In recognition of professional excellence, Dr. Glenn was featured in more than 15 editions of Who's Who in America, as well as the 6th, 11th and 12th editions of Who's Who in Science and Engineering.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Man Y.-G.,Diagnostic and Translational Research Center | Fu S.W.,George Washington University | Liu A.J.,Beijing 301 Hospital | Stojadinovic A.,U.S. Army | And 3 more authors.
Cancer Genomics and Proteomics | Year: 2011

Our recent studies have suggested that prostate tumor invasion is triggered by autoimmunoreactions induced focal basal cell layer disruptions (FBCLD) that selectively favor monoclonal proliferation of the overlying progenitors or of a biologically more aggressive cell clone. As circulating chromogranin-A (CgA) levels are found to correlate with tumor progression and the status of hormone refractoriness, our current study attempted to assess whether CgA-positive cells would be preferentially distributed in epithelial structures with FBCLD. Paraffin-embedded specimens from 50 patients with organ-confined prostate cancer were subjected to double immunohistochemical analysis with monoclonal antibodies to basal cells and CgA. From each case, 3-5 randomly selected fields were digitally photographed and the photos were magnified 400% and the numbers of CgA-positive cells in epithelial structures with non-disrupted, focally disrupted, and lost basal cell layer were separately counted. The averaged number of cell for each category was statistically compared with the Pearson's Chi-square test. In addition, morphologically similar structures with and without CgA-positive cell clusters were microdissected from four selected cases and subjected to a comparison of differential micro-RNA expression levels. Our study revealed that, although isolated CgA-positive cells were seen in both the basal cell layer and the luminal cell population in all cases, only 8 cases (16%) harbored large clusters of CgA-positive cells that were concentrated in a given area, in which all or nearly all cells appeared to share a similar morphological and immunohistochemical profile. Microdissected epithelial structures with CgA-positive cell clusters exhibited a more than 5- and 7-fold lower expression of miR-146a and miR-146b-5p than their CgA-negative counterparts. As focal basal cell layer disruptions and the reduction or loss of miR-146a and miR-146b-5p has been documented to correlate with prostate tumor invasion and hormone refractoriness, our findings suggest that aberrant CgA expression in epithelial structures with FBCLD may represent an early sign of these events.


Lyons E.A.,American Registry of Pathology | Lyons E.A.,Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory | Scheible M.K.,American Registry of Pathology | Scheible M.K.,Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory | And 7 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2013

Background: A population reference database of complete human mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) sequences is needed to enable the use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) coding region data in forensic casework applications. However, the development of entire mtGenome haplotypes to forensic data quality standards is difficult and laborious. A Sanger-based amplification and sequencing strategy that is designed for automated processing, yet routinely produces high quality sequences, is needed to facilitate high-volume production of these mtGenome data sets. Results: We developed a robust 8-amplicon Sanger sequencing strategy that regularly produces complete, forensic-quality mtGenome haplotypes in the first pass of data generation. The protocol works equally well on samples representing diverse mtDNA haplogroups and DNA input quantities ranging from 50 pg to 1 ng, and can be applied to specimens of varying DNA quality. The complete workflow was specifically designed for implementation on robotic instrumentation, which increases throughput and reduces both the opportunities for error inherent to manual processing and the cost of generating full mtGenome sequences. Conclusions: The described strategy will assist efforts to generate complete mtGenome haplotypes which meet the highest data quality expectations for forensic genetic and other applications. Additionally, high-quality data produced using this protocol can be used to assess mtDNA data developed using newer technologies and chemistries. Further, the amplification strategy can be used to enrich for mtDNA as a first step in sample preparation for targeted next-generation sequencing. © 2013 Lyons et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Gibb H.,Tetra Tech Inc. | Fulcher K.,Tetra Tech Inc. | Nagarajan S.,American Registry of Pathology | McCord S.,Washington State University | And 3 more authors.
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2013

Objectives: We examined the relationship between radiation and excess deaths from mesothelioma among deceased nuclear workers who were part of the US Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Methods: We performed univariate analysis with SAS Version 9.1 software. We conducted proportionate mortality ratio (PMR) and proportionate cancer mortality ratio (PCMR) analyses using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Life Table Analysis System with the referent group being all deaths in the United States. Results: We found a PMR of 62.40 (P <.05) and a PCMR of 46.92 (P <.05) for mesothelioma. PMRs for the 4 cumulative external radiation dose quartiles were 61.83, 57.43, 74.46, and 83.31. PCMRs were 36.16, 47.07, 51.35, and 67.73. The PMR and PCMR for trachea, bronchus, and lung cancer were not significantly elevated. Conclusions: The relationship between cumulative external radiation dose and the PMR and PCMR for mesothelioma suggests that external radiation at nuclear facilities is associated with an increased risk of mesothelioma. The lack of a significantly elevated PMR and PCMR for trachea, bronchus, and lung cancer suggests that asbestos did not confound this relationship.


Scheible M.,American Registry of Pathology | Scheible M.,Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory | Loreille O.,American Registry of Pathology | Loreille O.,Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory | And 4 more authors.
Forensic Science International: Genetics | Year: 2014

To investigate the feasibility of next generation sequencing technology (NGS) for the multiplex detection and sequence production of short tandem repeats (STRs) from degraded and low DNA quantity samples, standard polymerase chain reaction amplification methods were used to enrich for commonly employed STR markers. Samples were amplified with two multiplexing strategies: a multiplex containing thirteen miniSTR markers and a series of multiplexes containing four miniSTR markers each. Each sample multiplex was barcoded with a sample-specific multiplex identifier for subsequent parallel tagged sequencing on the GS Junior System (454 Life Sciences, a Roche company, Branford, CT). Sequencing results from over fifty DNA extracts representing both pristine samples and low-quality evidentiary specimens reflected known genotypes and were consistent across multiple extracts and/or amplifications of the same sample. Furthermore, the NGS data revealed sequence information not available with standard capillary electrophoresis-based detection alone. For the population samples tested, a total of 152 single nucleotide polymorphisms or insertions/deletions were identified in over 935 recovered alleles, averaging one polymorphism for every six recovered alleles. For three of the loci, the sequence information doubled the number of alleles detected via traditional STR typing by fragment analysis. In addition, twenty-eight of these variants were only seen once within our dataset, highlighting the potential for discrimination among individuals. These additional data are likely to be particularly valuable in missing persons and disaster victim identification cases for which only partial profiles may be recovered and/or only distant kin are available as references. And, considering the opportunity to target only small amplicons with NGS, this type of STR typing will allow for greater information recovery from challenging casework samples. While our results highlight the potential of new technologies for recovering discriminatory genetic information from evidentiary specimens, our data also reveal the complexities of NGS-based STR typing, both in terms of the laboratory assays themselves as well as the downstream data processing and analysis. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Al-Zahery N.,University of Pavia | Saunier J.,American Registry of Pathology | Saunier J.,U.S. Air force | Ellingson K.,American Registry of Pathology | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Legal Medicine | Year: 2013

To evaluate the utility of mtDNA control region data for the purposes of forensic DNA testing in Iraq, a sample of 182 subjects (128 Arab Muslims, 15 Kurd Muslims, 22 Assyrian Christians and 17 Mandaean Arabs) was tested. High numbers of singleton haplotypes were observed among Arabs, Kurds and Assyrians, but fewer were found in Mandaeans. High molecular diversity and low random match probabilities confirmed the value of control region data in the investigation of maternal genetic lineages among the Iraqi population. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Patent
American Registry Of Pathology | Date: 2010-03-30

Methods of fixing and processing tissue and samples on a membrane by using ultrasound radiation as a part of the method are presented. Ultrasound of a frequency in the range of 0.1-50 MHz is used and the sample or tissue receives 0.1-200 W/cm^(2 )of ultrasound intensity. The use of ultrasound allows much shorter times in the methods. Also presented are apparati comprising transducers of one or of multiple heads for producing the ultrasound radiation and further comprising a central processing unit and optionally comprising one or more sensors. Sensors can include those to measure and monitor ultrasound and temperature. This monitoring system allows one to achieve accurate and optimum tissue fixation and processing without overfixation and tissue damage. The system also allows the performance of antigen-antibody reactions or nucleic acid hybridizations to be completed in a very short time while being highly specific and with a very low or no background.


PubMed | American Registry of Pathology
Type: | Journal: BMC genomics | Year: 2013

A population reference database of complete human mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) sequences is needed to enable the use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) coding region data in forensic casework applications. However, the development of entire mtGenome haplotypes to forensic data quality standards is difficult and laborious. A Sanger-based amplification and sequencing strategy that is designed for automated processing, yet routinely produces high quality sequences, is needed to facilitate high-volume production of these mtGenome data sets.We developed a robust 8-amplicon Sanger sequencing strategy that regularly produces complete, forensic-quality mtGenome haplotypes in the first pass of data generation. The protocol works equally well on samples representing diverse mtDNA haplogroups and DNA input quantities ranging from 50 pg to 1 ng, and can be applied to specimens of varying DNA quality. The complete workflow was specifically designed for implementation on robotic instrumentation, which increases throughput and reduces both the opportunities for error inherent to manual processing and the cost of generating full mtGenome sequences.The described strategy will assist efforts to generate complete mtGenome haplotypes which meet the highest data quality expectations for forensic genetic and other applications. Additionally, high-quality data produced using this protocol can be used to assess mtDNA data developed using newer technologies and chemistries. Further, the amplification strategy can be used to enrich for mtDNA as a first step in sample preparation for targeted next-generation sequencing.


PubMed | American Registry of Pathology
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of immunological methods | Year: 2011

We have selected two lipopolysaccharide (LPS) specific Burkholderia mallei mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and four anti-capsular B. pseudomallei-specific mAbs to generate mouse single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. This selection was made through extensive in vitro and in vivo assay from our library of mAbs against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. We initially generated the mouse immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (VH) and light chain (VL) regions from each of these six selected mAbs using a phage display scFv technology. We determined the coding sequences of the VH and VL regions and successfully constructed two B. mallei-specific scFv phage antibodies consisting of two different VH (VH1 and VH2) and one V1 families. Four scFvs constructed against B. pseudomallei had two VH (VH1 and VH6) and two VL (V4/5 and V21) families. All of six scFv antibodies constructed demonstrated good binding activity without any rounds of biopanning against B. mallei (M5D and M18F were 0.425 and 0.480 at OD405nm) and B. pseudomallei (P1E7, P2I67, P7C6, and P7F4 were 0.523, 0.859, 0.775, and 0.449 at OD405nm) by ELISA, respectively. A comparison of the immunoglobulin gene segments revealed that the gene sequences in complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of three out of four B. pseudomallei-specific scFvs are highly conserved. We determined that the two B. mallei-specific scFvs have different CDRs in the VH, but the amino acid sequences of CDRs in the VL are conserved. This high sequence homology found in CDRs of VH or VL of these mAbs contributes to our better understanding and determination of binding to the specific antigenic epitope(s). The scFv phage display technology may be a valuable tool to develop and engineer mAbs with improved antigen-binding affinity.

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