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Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 15.00K | Year: 2013

The International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) will hold the XXXVII International Congress of Physiological Sciences in Birmingham, UK, July 21-26, 2013. The American Physiological Society (APS) will administer a travel grant program offering a limited number of travel awards to qualified scientists interested in attending the IUPS Congress. The APS has conducted a travel grant program and assisted U.S. scientists engaged in physiological research and its applications to attend Congresses every four years since the IUPS Congress was held in Buenos Aires in 1959. Most recently, the APS managed a travel award program for US physiologists for the IUPS Congress in 2009 in Kyoto, Japan. Special emphasis will be given to investigators within 15 years of receiving their doctoral degree and to women and under-represented minority scientists. Travel awards resulting from this proposal will be directed to individuals working in the research areas supported by the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems. Travel awards will 1) promote widespread participation of young scientists with an emphasis on women and under-represented minorities; 2) interest new investigators and students in pursuing research designed to understand physiological processes and traits; and 3) provide opportunities for the development of collaborative interactions with scientists from the United States and those working in other countries. The scientific program for the XXXVII Congress was developed by an international program committee with representatives both from the host society, The Physiological Society, and the IUPS. The program is organized around a number of IUPS Commissions. Traditionally, the one most relevant to NSF is associated with the Commission for Comparative Physiology: Evolution, Adaptation & Environment. While the sessions associated with this Commission are most relevant, there are many others that should be of interest to comparative physiologists, providing physiological insights related to their comparative studies.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Physiolg Mechansms&Biomechancs | Award Amount: 15.50K | Year: 2014

This award provides participant support for an American Physiological Society (APS) Intersociety Meeting on Comparative and Evolutionary physiology to be held October 5-8, 2014, in San Diego, CA. This APS Intersociety Meeting will be the sixth in a series of meetings, held every four years, on the topic of comparative and evolutionary physiology. This has been a highly successful series, attracting 400-600 attendees, with a high proportion of international, female, and junior scientists. The APS Intersociety Meeting on Comparative and Evolutionary Physiology is one of only a limited number of international meetings solely dedicated to the dissemination of recent conceptual and technological advances in this diverse and exciting area. The theme of the meeting will be Comparative Approaches to Grand Challenges in Physiology. This theme emphasizes the application of the Krogh Principle to solve major physiological questions and features the grand challenges concept articulated by the National Sciences Foundation. Examples of such challenges include evaluating the mechanistic responses of animals to changing environments, using genomes to inform physiology and vice versa, understanding the benefits (and assumptions) of animal models of human disease, and teaching integrative animal physiology to the next generation of scientists. Support from the award will: 1) fund trainee workshops on The Challenge of Teaching Physiology in a Changing Environment: Innovations and Resources and Non-Traditional Career Paths for Comparative Physiologists; and 2) promote the participation of young scientists in this Intersociety Meeting through the establishment of NSF-funded travel awards.

This meeting is anticipated to have tremendous impact on the field of comparative and evolutionary physiology and considerable influence on the development of young scientists in this area. The trainee workshops will provide valuable insights into career development and teaching methods that will ensure continued progress and vitality of this important area of physiology. Along with travel awards, this proposal will extend the reach of this meeting by (a) attracting a larger number of participants to this meeting and (b) recognizing the most meritorious research contributions by young investigators in this area. The funds will augment the APS contribution to travel and minority access awards, thereby improving support for young and minority investigators and broadening the impact of this APS Intersociety Meetings.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: TUES-Type 1 Project | Award Amount: 50.00K | Year: 2014

This incubator project is establishing the Physiology Educators Community of Practice (PECOP) which centers primarily on undergraduate education, but encompasses multiple teaching levels (K-12, grad/professional), including international and novice educators. PECOP also promotes strong participation by faculty at institutions serving underrepresented students. The American Physiological Society (APS) has developed key components to support the PECOP, including a National Science Digital Library with tools to build and support teaching and learning communities (APS Archive of Teaching Resources, www.apsarchive.org), online faculty development to promote online community involvement, and new support for a biannual conference on teaching and learning which will offer workshops and sessions for faculty from all types of institutions. The conference serves as a forum to build the PECOP structure and recruit participants, encouraging educators to interact, share resources, and collaborate on an ongoing basis. It also provides an opportunity for physiology educators to learn how to use scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL) methodologies to improve their teaching and offers teaching professional skills training for new physiologists.

This RCN-UBE project is using Archive community tools and the teaching conference to organize and launch PECOP, a support community that provides resources, training, mentoring, and community benefits for the teaching of physiology. In the organizational stages, the project is recruiting Thought Leaders who will guide discussions at the conference and online on key topics such as curriculum development, student-centered learning, assessment, effective undergraduate research experiences, and SOTL methods. Finally, the project is providing support to promote participation in PECOP via regional and national meetings of physiology educators.

The Intellectual Merit of this initiative is the creation of an active community of practice (COP) that will increase the overall impact and effectiveness of physiology, which is among the most common undergraduate course topics worldwide. PECOP will encourage and support best teaching practices, evidence-based teaching and preparation of new educators to work with diverse students through training, resource sharing, and mentoring in live and online settings.

Broader Impacts of PECOP lie in its engagement of physiologists from diverse institutions, the support for collaborations among new and experienced educators to share educational research and best practices, and the important communication forum it provides across educational levels (undergrad-grad-professional).

This project is funded jointly by the Directorate for Biological Sciences and the Directorate of Education and Human Resources, Division of Undergraduate Education in support of efforts to address the challenges posed in Vision and Change in Undergraduate Education: A Call to Action http://visionandchange.org/finalreport/.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CROSS-EF ACTIVITIES | Award Amount: 535.00K | Year: 2012

The American Physiological Society (APS) will address critical needs for increased diversity among physiologists conducting integrative organismal systems (IOS) biology research by building an annual cohort of underrepresented (UR) undergraduate students engaged in IOS research working with members of APS Comparative and Evolutionary Physiology Section (CEPS).

APS will build on the strengths of its existing programs to create long-term solutions to specific needs for increasing diversity in the IOS field. The APS IOSP Fellows will conduct research during the summer, present at APS conferences, gain skills through online professional development activities, and become proponents for IOS research via APS social media outlets and Physiology Understanding Week. APS expects IOSP Fellows to become active participants in the IOS professional community and will evaluate both short- and long-term impacts of the Fellowship. The project will increase the number of UR students participating in IOS-related research; develop a professional network of support among UR students and researchers; and increase understanding of, and interest in IOS careers among the target group of students.
APS will also create a resource collection on supporting students with disabilities in the research lab. The collection will be freely available via APS NSDL digital library, the Archive of Teaching Resources (www.apsarchive.org).

With diversity as a national imperative in STEM fields, this project will create and evaluate resources to improve research hosts skills in working with UR students from broad backgrounds and with diverse needs and resources for engaging UR undergraduates in research experiences, in professional socialization activities, and as advocates for science to the general public. This will provide a model for other scientific societies in identifying and addressing specific needs in their ongoing diversity efforts, which will be shared with the community at the PI meeting.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 400.00K | Year: 2012

This education project is developing, field-testing, and widely disseminating a set of teaching modules
for building graduate student skills in publication ethics to address the need to provide relevant and current knowledge of and appreciation for the facts and principles of the eight most common publication ethics issues, as well as the tools needed to integrate and apply the guidelines to actual situations using professional standards of practice. These tools are for use by higher education institutions, laboratory groups, individuals, and professional societies and incorporate proven materials and methods, as well as novel approaches. They are effective for US and international graduate students in science and engineering programs and integrate easily into Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training. An online Community of Practice (COP) is being designed to engage trainees and experienced scientists and engineers in ongoing discussions about scientific publishing, publication ethics, and professional standards of practice in these areas.

The American Physiological Society (APS) has extensive experience in the development and implementation of professional skills, training programs, and professional development programs in science, including for women and minorities. The collaborating societies (Society for Biological Engineers and Biomedical Engineering Society) and the Project Advisory Board include exceptionally qualified researchers, editors, and educators not only in physiology but also in engineering, research integrity, and ethics education. The outcomes are therefore expected to be broadly applicable in science and engineering across a variety of institution types including those who serve under-represented groups, especially as the materials and evaluation results are being disseminated via websites and digital libraries as well as via education journal articles and presentations and ongoing courses offered by the APS and other participating organizations.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 521.45K | Year: 2011

In this NSDL Usage Development Workshops project the American Physiological Society is transforming its existing resource repository to a dynamic platform (the Archive) supporting a community of biology educators. Participating faculty are using new Archive tools to promote discussion, sharing, and recommendations of teaching resources and strategies focusing on both how to use resources and their effectiveness in the classroom, with an eye towards forming a reflective community of practice. To organize participants, the project is creating and supporting like-minded User Groups of faculty who teach similar courses at similar institutions. Furthermore, the project is providing online faculty development workshops - Archive Scholar Online Workshops - to teach expanded skills for finding and using high quality online materials and for annotating and sharing these resources with colleagues. The strong intellectual merit of this approach is enhanced by the projects evaluation of these tools and professional development activities for their impacts on faculty skills and behaviors using a quasi-experimental design. The projects broader impacts are felt through its designation of faculty who complete these professional development activities as Archive Scholars, thus identifying a cadre of faculty leaders. In addition, the project is devoting special attention to recruiting and supporting minority faculty and faculty from historically minority institutions for both the User Groups and Archive Scholars activities.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Join us in Chicago or register for virtual newsroom access BETHESDA, Md., Feb. 16, 2017 - World-renowned scientists will present pioneering research and discuss key issues affecting the life sciences at the 2017 Experimental Biology meeting (EB 2017), the premier annual meeting of six scientific societies in Chicago to be held April 22-26. Register for a free onsite press pass to see these speakers in person. Or, stay up to date on all the exciting research news at EB 2017 through the new EB Virtual Newsroom, your one-stop shop for press releases, meeting information and blog posts. EB 2017 will feature the latest advances in anatomy, biochemistry and molecular biology, investigative pathology, nutrition, pharmacology and physiology. This year's speaker line-up includes presentations from the following leading scientists: Want to hear these speakers and follow hundreds of other research announcements at EB 2017? Here are your next steps: Learn More about the Virtual Newsroom: Get press releases, multimedia & news tips online View the Preliminary Program: Get the latest information on planned scientific sessions & events EB sponsoring societies include the American Association of Anatomists, American Physiological Society, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, American Society for Investigative Pathology, American Society for Nutrition and American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: scienceblogs.com

Mitochondria produce more than just ATP Pinchas Cohen from the University of California – Davis presented data showing that mitochondria produce more than just ATP. They also make several peptides that can each affect our physiology. Some help cells respond to insulin better, some help with weight, some regulate cell metabolism. What is even more impressive is that some of these peptides have been shown to slow down the development of atherosclerosis or Alzheimer’s, and some even help prevent side effects from chemotherapy in animals. Maybe some day we will see mitochondrial peptides on the market to treat various diseases. Boyett et al. (James Madison University) presented a poster showing that when ingested in the morning or evening, caffeine helps improve cycling performance in most people. Although for trained athletes it was only effective in the morning. Blame it on your genes if you don’t like exercise Rodney Dishman (University of Georgia) presented research showing that genes involved in regulating levels of dopamine in the brain could be to blame for exercise avoidance in some individuals. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter that signals pleasure, reward and drive. According to a press release from the American Physiological Society, Dr. Dishman stated, “Our current field trial with humans suggests that variations in genes that encode for dopamine and other neurotransmitters linked with physical activity account for low or high physical activity directly.” Exercise may protect us from the holidays Ludzi et al. (University of Michigan) presented a poster showing that people who do not exercise regularly develop increased signs of inflammation in their fat tissues after just one-week of excessive calories. In contrast, exercise was shown to protect our fat tissues from developing inflammation even after a week of overeating.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

2017 is barely two months old, so New Year’s fitness resolutions are still mostly being honored, as people continue to watch what they eat and exercise furiously. As so often happens, however, it won’t last more than a few weeks, and that could readily lead to fat increase and weight gain. According to a study published by the American Physiological Society, researchers found that yo-yo exercising – months of regular exercise followed by a long relapse into very little, if any, exercise – is ineffective at best and seriously fat-inducing at worst. “Yo-yo exercising is as impactful on your health and weight gain as yo-yo dieting is,” Dr. Goldman said. “While intense exercise may have benefits for the heart and skin, It’s a common misconception that heavy exertion while exercising – such as cycling or running on the treadmill for 45-60 minutes – burns significantly more calories and ramps up your metabolism more than following the recommended moderate 20-25-minute routine. As a result, many people think they have a calorie deficit that allows them to maintain their weight and reduce fat even if they stop exercising for a few weeks.” Researchers found that the metabolism of participants who underwent three weeks of intense exercise adapted to the routine and began to store the participants’ extra energy in the form of fat. Accordingly, when the participants stopped exercising, their bodies quickly began the process of adipocyte hyperplasia, or they simply began growing fat cells at an alarming rate. Furthermore, research found that the type of exercise is irrelevant. “Although it shouldn’t have been, it was surprising to learn that all types of athletes doing various sports were affected the same – runners, swimmers, martial artists, cyclists, cross fitness enthusiasts, etc.,” Dr. Goldman said. “The participants all put on noticeable amounts of weight once they stopped their intense exercising. Even worse, once the participants resumed their previous routines at the same intensity levels to try and lose what they had gained, they didn’t lose as much as was expected, which leads one to wonder how much this is contributing to the rise in obesity around the country.” Dr. Goldman and others in the medical and fitness communities advocate moderate exercise on a consistent basis along with intense exercise to build muscle and improve the cardiovasculature system . Individuals enduring this type of yo-yo exercise effect do have additional options for reducing fat, including a variety of cosmetic body sculpting procedures, such as liposuction and CoolSculpting, among others. Maintaining a consistent diet and exercise routine in addition to undergoing a liposuction or body contouring procedure can help ensure long-lasting results. To learn more about body sculpting treatments that aid in reaching fat reduction goals that diet and exercise cannot, visit http://Liposuction-SanDiego.com/Stomach-Fat-Removal/. “I would caution individuals who have just started a new exercise routine for the new year to include in their exercise routine a stable form of exercise in moderation,” Dr. Goldman said. “Don’t only overdo it, as that’s a common reason for quitting – it takes too much time or it eventually gets tiresome; furthermore, don’t treat yourself to a piece of cake or an extra slice of bacon on your burger too often as a reward for hitting exercise goals. A simple, consistent regimen of walking, running, cycling, weight-training, hiking, or even doing yard work is better in the long run than on-again, off-again exercise routines.” Cosmetic Laser Dermatology is an esteemed cosmetic clinic located in beautiful San Diego, California. The team of board-certified dermatologists is committed to providing each and every patient with the highest level of care in a comfortable setting. Cosmetic Laser Dermatology’s dermatologists are all highly respected in the field for their use of innovative treatments, involvement in advanced medical research, and continued participation in clinical trials. For more information please visit http://www.CLDerm.com


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

LA JOLLA, CA - December 13, 2016 - Diet composition around the time of pregnancy may influence whether offspring become obese, according to a new study using animal models at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). "Your diet itself matters, not just whether you are gaining excess weight or developing gestational diabetes," said TSRI Associate Professor Eric Zorrilla, who led the study in collaboration with Tim R. Nagy of the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Barry E. Levin of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center of East Orange, New Jersey, and Rutgers University. In fact, the researchers found that giving females a typical American, or Western, diet appeared to set the next generation up for lifelong obesity issues. This work was published recently in the American Journal of Physiology and featured in APSselect, a collection of the best research papers from all journals published by the American Physiological Society. It's Not Just about Weight The researchers made this discovery by studying two lines of rats, one selectively bred to be obesity-resistant to a high-fat diet and one bred to be unusually vulnerable. Rats from each group were fed either a diet with the same overall fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate and protein levels as a typical Western diet, or a lower-fat, higher-grain control diet. The scientists found that female rats given a Western diet in the weeks leading up to pregnancy, during pregnancy and during nursing had offspring more prone to obesity at birth, during early adolescence and--many months later--through adulthood. This occurred even if the mothers themselves did not overeat and maintained a healthy weight, body fat and insulin status. Zorrilla said the results were surprising because, whereas previous studies had shown that overweight mothers were more likely to have overweight offspring, the new findings suggest that diet alone can make a difference independent of weight gain. The Western diet seemed to set in motion a metabolic "program" that lasted throughout the rat's life. Although these rats slimmed down during puberty and early adulthood, they still showed a lower basal metabolic rate (less energy expended at while rest) and higher food intake during that time, which led to a return of obesity in mid-adulthood. "What we found interesting was that you sometimes see the same thing in humans, when a kid goes through a growth spurt," said study first author Jen Frihauf, who recently completed her PhD through the University of California, San Diego, while working in the Zorrilla lab at TSRI. The researchers also spotted an interesting difference in the effects of the Western diet between the obesity-vulnerable and obesity-resistant lines: in females, the diet impaired the reproduction of the obesity vulnerable lines. Significantly fewer of females were able to reproduce, and those that did reproduce had fewer offspring. "This wasn't the focus of the study, but it supports the idea that a Western diet promotes infertility in mothers vulnerable to diet-induced obesity," said Zorrilla. The researchers also identified elevated levels of several molecules, such as insulin and hormones called leptin and adiponectin, starting at birth in both the Western diet and genetically vulnerable offspring. This hormone profile may serve as an early biomarker for detecting obesity risk. The Takeaway for Moms: Better Nutrition Research is ongoing into which aspects of a Western diet trigger these effects--and the molecular changes in the offspring responsible for them. Zorrilla said the findings should raise awareness of the importance of a healthy pre- and post-natal diet. For example, doctors may want to discuss nutrition with all women who are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant, not just those already overweight. "Doctors often use weight gain as a hallmark of a healthy pregnancy," said Frihauf. "But we realized there was something going on in utero that wasn't detectable in the mother's weight." Frihauf added that few pregnant women, even in the United States, eat a high-fat, high-sugar diet all day, every day. "We're not trying to tell pregnant women not to occasionally splurge on a piece of cake," she said. Studies have also shown that paternal diet, through "epigenetic" mechanisms that control how genes are expressed, can affect obesity risk in offspring, added Zorrilla, so nutritional information may be valuable for potential fathers as well. In addition to Zorrilla, Nagy, Levin and Frihauf, the study, "Maternal Western Diet Increases Adiposity Even in Male Offspring of Obesity-Resistant Rat Dams: Early Endocrine Risk Markers," was authored by Éva M. Fekete, previous of TSRI and now at The University of Wisconsin-Madison. This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants R01DK-070118, R01DK-30066, R01DK-076896, F31DA026708-01A2, R21DK-077616, P30DK-056336 and P30DK-079626) and the Research Service of the VA. The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is one of the world's largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. TSRI is internationally recognized for its contributions to science and health, including its role in laying the foundation for new treatments for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, and other diseases. An institution that evolved from the Scripps Metabolic Clinic founded by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps in 1924, the institute now employs more than 2,500 people on its campuses in La Jolla, CA, and Jupiter, FL, where its renowned scientists--including two Nobel laureates and 20 members of the National Academy of Science, Engineering or Medicine--work toward their next discoveries. The institute's graduate program, which awards PhD degrees in biology and chemistry, ranks among the top ten of its kind in the nation. For more information, see http://www. .

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