The American Physical Society is the world's second largest organization of physicists. The Society publishes more than a dozen scientific journals, including the prestigious Physical Review and Physical Review Letters, and organizes more than 20 science meetings each year. It is also a member society of the American Institute of Physics. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: Integrative Activities in Phys | Award Amount: 64.81K | Year: 2016

This award supports a two-day workshop for NSF-Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Physics Site directors both to discuss effective practices in the current REU programs as well as to learn more about effective practices in programs outside of the NSF-REU Physics Sites. In particular, the participants will learn about current results in assessment of undergraduate research experiences and programs that have increased the diversity in undergraduate research programs from other disciplines and discuss how to adapt/adopt these ideas for Physics REU sites. Participants will discuss the current challenges and opportunities they face in their individual programs as well as challenges faced by the Physics REU-Site program as a whole and devise a plan for addressing these issues.

The program serves the national interests by not only promoting the advancement of science carried out at the REU Sites by research mentors and their undergraduate proteges, but by training the next generation of science researchers. In addition, the report developed as a part of this project will be a resource that all Physics undergraduate research programs (not just NSF REU sites) can utilize to improve their undergraduate research programs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 142.00K | Year: 2016

The PIPELINE Network project will significantly enhance physics education by developing and evaluating methods to incorporate workforce-relevant skills and activities in the student experience. The majority of physics graduates at all degree levels will become scientists and innovators working in the private sector, yet very little of the knowledge they gain while earning their degree specifically prepares them for these roles (for example, few physics programs emphasize real-world applications of scientific concepts, communication skills, or basic business concepts, all of which are important to successful private sector careers). Adding workforce-relevant learning to the discipline will attract a larger and more diverse student body to major in physics, and by extension improve the quality of the future STEM workforce. The PIPELINE project will bring together efforts of six institutions to create and document new approaches to teaching innovation and entrepreneurship in physics which can be shared with the broader community. The project will also advance our understanding of how these practices affect student and faculty attitudes towards innovation and entrepreneurship in physics.

The goals of the PIPELINE network are to build students workforce confidence, improve physics faculty attitudes toward private sector careers, foster better integration of academic and industrial sectors, promote innovation in the physics discipline, and build a framework for wider adoption of physics innovation and entrepreneurship practices. The project will accomplish these by implementing physics innovation and entrepreneurship (PIE) approaches at member institutions during each year of the project, revising approaches between iterations, and finally documenting and disseminating curriculum. Most importantly, PIPELINE will develop surveys and interview protocols which will investigate the link between PIE experiences and student and faculty attitudes about innovation and entrepreneurship, and which can be used by other departments for gauging, monitoring, and improving institutional change around PIE. These research findings and tools will provide insights and utility that go beyond the immediate partner institutions, and live on beyond the duration of the project. PIPELINE will generate a core network of experienced PIE practitioners, a readily accessible body of tested PIE curricula deliberately varied in scope to fit unique needs and challenges of future adopters, and robust insight into the obstacles to PIE implementation and how future adopters might address them.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Integrative Activities in Phys | Award Amount: 201.00K | Year: 2014

Though many physicists are engaged in outreach, the variety of activities in which they are engaged is surprisingly small. For those venturing beyond the standard public lectures and science cafes there is currently nowhere to disseminate the knowledge they gain from both the successful and failed public outreach attempts. This project will fund highly innovative outreach activities and their successes and failures will add significantly to the body of outreach knowledge. The associated Outreach Guide will disseminate these best practices to others interested in beginning their own programs.

The goal of the American Physical Society Outreach Program is to enable innovative outreach projects that aim to bring physics to the public outside of the classroom. These projects will not only directly affect the target audience of such projects, but will also affect the climate surrounding public outreach and engagement. Despite the benefits of public outreach there are many obstacles in the way of those interested in starting such programs. The program will help scientists surmount these barriers.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 444.32K | Year: 2014

This award to the American Physical Society supports the Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP), held annually since 2006. The conferences have two overarching goals: 1) to give undergraduate women the resources, motivation, and confidence to apply to graduate school and to successfully complete a Ph.D. in physics or a related discipline; and 2) to increase awareness by undergraduate women in physics of the wide range of career opportunities available to them. Regional conferences are held simultaneously to maximize student attendance by minimizing travel, to increase the excitement of the participants in a joint national venture, and to allow the interactive simulcast of a keynote address.

The project looks to evaluate self-efficacy beliefs, physics identity and outcome expectations of the participants. Through this research and the project evaluation, there is potential to gain new knowledge about the issues facing undergraduate women in physics, as well as how effective activities like these are. The project will advance our understanding of factors that impact the ability of female students to pursue undergraduate degrees in physics and have a positive impact on a population that remains underrepresented in physics.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: FLUID DYNAMICS | Award Amount: 25.00K | Year: 2016

PI: Cole, Ken
Proposal Number: CBET - 1650056


The award partially covers travel expenses of graduate students, post-doctoral researchers, and junior faculty members from institutions in the United States to participate in the conference entitled, ?American Physical Society, Division of Fluid Dynamics, 69th Annual DFD Meeting 2016? in Portland, OR, November 20-22, 2016. This is the largest international annual meeting of fluid dynamicists in the world, with over 2,500 anticipated attendees. The meeting has been successfully run for close to seventy years.

The priorities of the travel grant program are to partially fund students, young scientists, and, in general, scientists from under-represented groups. The APS DFD Executive Committee plans to contribute $20,000 and the American Institute for Physics plans to contribute $10,000 to the overall budget for travel awards. This total amount expected is $55,000 to facilitate travel subsidies and registration fee coverage for about 70 participants. The chief intellectual merit of this conference lies in the exchange of scientific ideas, presentations of cutting edge research, and exposure to a richly diverse array of topics in virtually every sub-discipline of fluid dynamics. The broader impact will be to increase participation of students and young scientists who would not otherwise be able to afford to travel to the meeting and pay associated costs. Preference is given: (i) to those presenting talks at the meeting, (ii) to students, (iii) to those who have not received such an award in the past, and (iv) to no more than one applicant from a given research adviser. Since the awards are meant to supplement participant travel funds, not to cover these entirely, the committee takes into account the travel budget entered on the application. Special effort is made to achieve diverse participation from underrepresented groups in engineering, including women and members of minority groups. Even though the conference is attended by worldwide attendees, the NSF support will fund individuals from the US.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 47.15K | Year: 2015

This significant and important project will convene a group of prominent physicists from academia and industry to construct a report detailing what should be taught in undergraduate physics programs. The goal is to ensure that the next generation of undergraduate physics majors are well prepared for diverse careers in physics. When the report is finished it will be disseminated to all physics departments nationally.

The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) and the American Physical Society (APS) will convene the Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs (J-TUPP) and produce and disseminate the report. These organizations have asked J-TUPP to prepare a report that will engage and inform physicists in answering the question: What skills and knowledge should the next generation of undergraduate physics degree holders possess to be well prepared for a diverse set of careers. The report will provide guidance for physicists considering revising the undergraduate curriculum to improve the education of a diverse student population. The report will include recommendations on content, pedagogy, professional skills, and student engagement and will emphasize the collection of documentable student outcomes. The results of J-TUPPs deliberations will add significantly to the knowledge base of critical core concepts and core physics practices that inform how undergraduate physics programs can best prepare students with wide-ranging career interests. The effort will focus on aspects of physics programs preparing students for immediate employment after receiving their bachelors degrees. It directly addresses several critical STEM workforce issues including the development of a diverse, globally competitive STEM workforce and increased partnerships between undergraduate physics programs and industry. Particular attention will be paid to the structural features of undergraduate physics programs that promote the recruitment and retention of students from groups historically underrepresented in physics. This project is jointly funded by the Division of Undergraduate Education in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources and the Division of Physics in the Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Integrative Activities in Phys | Award Amount: 411.72K | Year: 2014

Women now occupy approximately half of all seats in high school physics classrooms, but fewer than one in four undergraduate physics degrees are awarded to women. Worse still, only eight percent of full professors in physics faculty positions are women. Women physicists often do not receive the same level of support and mentoring throughout the various stages of their careers that men do, even if they do not experience overt discrimination. Many small but subtle acts of omission together with the isolation that comes from small numbers frequently add up to create a playing field that is far from level in terms of career advancement for women. The American Physical Society (APS) has run, for nine years, a series of influential workshops designed to improve communication, negotiation and leadership skills of female physicists. This award seeks to evolve these workshops into a sustainable model that will reach many more women.

This award will fund a continuation of the original workshops that also offers two new aspects: (1) training physicists as negotiation skills workshop facilitators who can conduct the Strategic Persuasion Seminars (SPS) at their institutions and at scientific conferences and (2) offering the traditional workshops on communication, negotiation and leadership skills at the larger APS divisional meetings. Information will be learned about what is of particular benefit to women in physics. Additionally the project will compare the impact of the workshops - delivered by the professional facilitators to the impact of the seminars - delivered by the physicists trained by the professional facilitators.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: NSF INCLUDES | Award Amount: 299.79K | Year: 2016

Physics awards smaller percentages of PhDs to women (19%) and underrepresented ethnic and racial minorities (7%) than any other field in the sciences, and underrepresentation is especially pronounced at selective universities. As global competition for scientific talent heats up and US demographics shift, cultivating a robust domestic workforce is critical to US technological leadership. We seek to build on the successful American Physical Society Bridge Program (apsbridgeprogram.org) by transforming physics graduate education to fully support the inclusion of women and ethnic and racial minorities. Our vision is to create a national network of disciplinary colleagues, expert researchers, and representatives from professional associations who will develop and build evidence-based knowledge of effective practices for recruitment, admissions, and retention of women and underrepresented ethnic and racial minorities. This pilot project will include six large, highly selective physics graduate programs to demonstrate and map out a plan for a discipline-wide effort. The pilot focuses on improving admissions practices, because this strategy promises immediate and measurable impact backed by extant research. The pilot will also take exploratory steps to develop scalable recruitment and retention strategies. To refine interventions, we will conduct research to identify and understand demographically-based loss points of students in graduate physics programs and to understand how network participation facilitates change. The project will also establish connections with other STEM disciplines, beginning with mathematics and chemistry, to explore expanding these efforts.

This project is grounded in research on diversity in graduate education, organizational learning, and the resources of networks to catalyze cultural change. The project team includes expertise in institutional change, graduate admissions, student success, diverse and inclusive environments, and social science research. The pilot advances a novel research agenda on inclusion in STEM by addressing recruitment, admissions, and retention in physics graduate education as interconnected challenges of faculty learning, professional networks, and disciplinary cultural change. Physics graduate programs will report admissions data and common metrics, and will document changes resulting from project activities. Faculty will be trained on holistic admissions and diversity in selection processes, and be guided in the use of inclusive admissions practices. An external evaluator will examine project effectiveness and readiness for scaling to an Alliance phase project.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) | Award Amount: 71.75K | Year: 2016

The issue of diversity in STEM is of national importance. The future needs of the US technological workforce necessitate cultivating the entire domestic talent pool, especially groups historically and currently underrepresented in STEM: women, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. Successfully transitioning underrepresented students to graduate studies is key to this vision, but the majority of STEM PhD programs are failing in this regard. This National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) award in the Innovations in Graduate Education (IGE) Track to the Rochester Institute of Technology and the American Physical Society (APS) will explore interventions that may help increase the access of US women and underrepresented minorities to physics PhD programs and increase the PhD completion rates of these groups. This innovative project will, for the first time, investigate how physics faculty approach admissions and student retention. Evaluation data from this project will allow the design of training materials to help faculty use more inclusive practices. Because these interventions are likely to be transferrable to different fields and institutions, the project has the potential to revolutionize how STEM graduate admission is carried out and to increase the completion rates of US citizens in STEM PhD programs.

This project will address graduate STEM education inclusion at both the admission and retention phases. To address access, the project will investigate faculty attitudes and admission measures. Physics faculty attitudes toward diversity, merit, and non-cognitive constructs will be assessed as a measure of change readiness. Participating faculty will then be trained in holistic admissions, a method that is proven to increase diversity in graduate education. The project will develop and validate a non-cognitive assessment tool as part of the holistic admissions packet. To address retention, faculty will be trained on evidence-based support structures that can help new graduate students manage the difficult first years of graduate school. Experimental faculty-centered workshops on admissions and retention will be developed and delivered by the project to four partnering programs at three universities (Rochester Institute of Technology, University of Central Florida, and University of Denver) and then at national meetings hosted by the APS. Formative assessments of these workshops throughout the grant period will be used to revise and refine the materials, resulting in an Admissions and Retention Faculty Training Program that may be used by departments across the country. The APS will curate the resulting materials and help facilitate training during and after project completion, ensuring wide dissemination and sustainable impact of proven practices.

The NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) Program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of bold, new, potentially transformative models for STEM graduate education training. The Innovations in Graduate Education Track is dedicated solely to piloting, testing, and evaluating novel, innovative, and potentially transformative approaches to graduate education.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: XC-Crosscutting Activities Pro | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2016

This award to the American Physical Society supports the continued growth and improvement of the Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP), held annually since 2006. The conferences have two overarching goals: 1) to give undergraduate women the resources, motivation, and confidence to increase their retention in physics and related disciplines; and 2) to increase awareness by undergraduate women in physics of the wide range of career opportunities available to them. Regional conferences are held simultaneously to maximize student attendance by minimizing travel, to increase the excitement of the participants in a joint national venture, and to allow the interactive simulcast of a keynote address.

The project aims to evaluate networking effectiveness, self-efficacy beliefs, physics identity, and outcome expectations of the participants. Through this research and the project evaluation, there is potential to gain new knowledge about issues facing undergraduate women in physics, as well as measures of the impact that conference activities such as these have on their attendees. The project will advance our understanding of factors that alter the trajectories of female students -- a population that remains underrepresented in physics -- as they pursue undergraduate degrees in physics.

This project is supported jointly by two divisions of NSFs Mathematical and Physical Sciences Directorate: the Division of Physics and the Division of Materials Research.

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