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Ernst S.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2015

Environmental pollution from toxic wastes emerged as a major global concern, and continued to be highlighted in the media. The spill of toxic waste into the Animas River in Colorado on August 5, 2015 was widely covered in the media. Another article published in the Denver Post on September 16, 2015, reported that every two days 230 old and abandoned mines in Colorado leach heavy metals into streams and rivers in amounts equal to the Animas River spill. The Huffington Post carried a feature by Mariah Blake detailing the long legal nightmare of residents of Parkersburg, West Virginia over the dumping of waste products from C8, the chemical that was used in many consumer products.


Ernst S.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2015

Steve Ernst, editor and general manager, American Laboratory, fears that there is and there will be no planet like Earth in billion years on which the human beings could survive. He believes that we have been blessed to have such a planet like Earth where there are living conditions. Plus, there are not only human, but also alltypes of plants and creatures who survive on the Earth. Even if the scientists have discovered living conditions in Mars, it is far from reality. Going to the Mars itself takes seven months despite it being the nearest planet. So the people should respect the Mother Earth and try not to pollute it and destroy its natural resources.


Stevenson R.L.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2015

The most significant topic to be discussed at the 2015 Molecular Med Tri-Con was circulating nucleic acids. Participants were informed that circulating nucleic acids provided a quick and sensitive window into tumor status and function. Liquid biopsies to characterize circulating nucleic acids were an attractive alternative to needle biopsies of solids, which missed their target due to tissue heterogeneity. The emphasis of the circulating nucleic acid track of the liquid biopsy symposium was on cancer diagnostics, while biomarkers for infectious diseases were discussed.


Stevenson R.L.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2015

Quality data depends on having a representative sample combined with similar analytics. Purposebuilt sample preparation products result in improved data quality and convenience.


Stevenson R.L.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2015

The potential market for POC systems is sizable and includes both physicians' office laboratories and the home market in the developed world. Instrument, reagent and information processing for CLIA waiver eligibility and FDA approval for home use will become a global de facto design goal. Changing the health-care paradigm to include POC diagnosis and treatment will certainly precipitate turf wars between current stakeholders. These will take time to resolve, but the real winner will be the patients and, hence, society, since outcomes will certainly improve.


Stevenson R.L.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2014

HPLC 2014, held from May 11-15, 2014 in New Orleans, LA, developed into a meeting where the lectures dominated the program. Professor Alan Marshall opened HPLC 2014 with a review of his work in high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), particularly ion cyclotron mass spectrometry. Dr. Alexey Makarov lectured on the effect of pressure on protein chromatography. The instrument was a conventional UHPLC with UV detection. A team from the laboratory of Gert Desmet described construction and evaluation of a low thermal mass modulator that is analogous to the thermal modulators (traps) used successfully in GC × GC. Another approach to × LC was offered by Agilent. The Parking Deck Cluster (PDC) is an automated valve module for the Agilent 1200 series. In the simplest form, the PDC automates heart-cutting with a two-position, six-port valve. Several lectures focused on column optimization for a particular separation, usually with carefully selected constraints.


Stevenson R.L.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2014

The Western Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society was held on October 4, 2013, in Santa Clara. The morning scientific program of the meeting consisted of case histories, all with a focus on a particular location. Anders Sutherland of Soil/Water/Air Protection Enterprise (SWAPE) reported on emissions from a collection of fractured natural gas wells drilled in the Barnett Shale about 30 miles northwest of Dallas. Dr. Mark Zeko from Environmental Engineering and Contracting led off the lectures on groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracking. He focused on the flow-back water, which many fear contains toxic material. He found that flow-back was only 3070% of the original charge. Prof. Matthew Becker described tomographic micro-seismic technology for the measurement of stress on the rock at the fault interfaces. Dr. Carl Fisher of Thermo Fisher Scientific, discussed the ion chromatography of anions in production water.


Stevenson R.L.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2013

Detectors for ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) need to provide low chromatographic dispersion as well as fast response. UV and MS were quickly optimized, but refractive index detectors have not been upgraded. Shimadzu has developed a new on-board method for deconvolution analysis called Intelligent Peak Deconvolution Analysis (i-PDeA). It uses spectral differences to tease the signals of the individual components from each other and presents the signal for each peak. AB SCIEX, Phenomenex, and Eurofins announced a cooperative program to develop and support methods for assay of animal feeds for anti-biotics, and residues of fungicides and pesticides. For metabolomics, AB SCIEX and LECO have partnered to meet the needs of customers for LC/MS and GS/MS assays. LECO will provide GCs with both nominal and Accurate Mass detection, while AB SCIEX will supply LCs with both triple quadrupole and TOF/MS systems.


Keith Brock T.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2012

T. Keith Brock shares his views on the significant role of molecular technology in the field of personalized medicine. The utility of molecular technologies is credited to the advancements in the identification of disease genes for a number of genetic diseases and susceptibilities, and the development of genetic targets for identification of disease-causing organisms. Molecular tests allow for rapid, simultaneous genetic profiling of multiple traits or mutations in a single diseased gene. Nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics are able to identify infectious disease organisms from a variety of sample matrices. Advantages of molecular infectious disease testing over conventional culture methods include rapid test results and quantifiable results that can correlate to disease severity.


Foster B.,Microscopy and Imaging Place Inc. | Foster B.,American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2012

The BioScope Catalyst opens new vistas for life science research. Its ScanAsyst and Peak Force QNM modes offer a gentler, more controlled, and directly quantitative solution especially well-suited for molecular biology, biophysics, and true nanomechanical studies. The powerful MIRO software precisely overlays nanoscale AFM imaging and measurements with light, confocal, and the various fluorescence modalities, providing new insights into cell dynamics and nano-mechanics. This new approach produces high-resolution images at all size domains, from single molecules to biomolecular aggregates such as membranes, then on to cells and tissue. ScanAsyst and Peak Force QNM promise to be exciting new tools for a wide range of applications, from the pathology of cancer, infectious diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders to proactive, commercialized technology in tissue engineering, biomemetics, and biosensors.

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