Huntington, WV, United States
Huntington, WV, United States

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Blubaugh M.V.,American Foundation for the Blind AFB Technology | Uslan M.M.,American Foundation for the Blind AFB Technology
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology | Year: 2012

The vast majority of diabetes-related self-management technology utilizes small visual displays (SVDs) that often produce a low level of contrast and sufer from high levels of reflection (glare). This is a major accessibility issue for the 3.5 million Americans with diabetes who have reduced vision. The purpose of this article is to gather comparative data on the key display attributes of the SVDs used in blood glucose meters (BGMs) and home blood pressure monitors (HBPMs) on the market today and determine which displays ofer the best prospect for being accessible to people with reduced vision. Nine BGMs and eight HBPMs were identified for this study on the basis of amount of devices sold, full-functionality speech output, and advanced display technologies. An optical instrumentation system obtained contrast, reflection (glare), and font height measurements for all 17 displays. The contrast, reflection, and font-height values for the BGMs and HBPMs varied greatly between models. The Michelson contrast values for the BGMs ranged from 11% to 98% and font heights ranged 0.39-1.00 in. for the measurement results. The HBPMs had Michelson contrast values ranging 55-96% and font height ranging 0.28-0.94 in. for the measurement results. Due largely to the lack of display design standards for the technical requirements of SVDs, there is tremendous variability in the quality and readability of BGM and HBPM displays. There were two BGMs and one HBPM that exhibited high-contrast values and large font heights, but most of the devices exhibited either poor contrast or exceptionally high reflection. © Diabetes Technology Society.


Burton D.M.,American Foundation for the Blind AFB Technology | Enigk M.G.,American Foundation for the Blind AFB Technology | Lilly J.W.,American Foundation for the Blind AFB Technology
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology | Year: 2012

In 2007, five blood glucose meters (BGMs) were introduced with integrated speech output necessary for use by persons with vision loss. One of those five meters had fully integrated speech output, allowing a person with vision loss independence in accessing all features and functions of the meter. In comparison, 13 BGMs with integrated speech output were available in 2011. Accessibility attributes of these 11 meters were tabulated and product design features examined. All 13 meters were found to be usable by persons with vision loss to obtain a blood glucose measurement. However, only 4 of them featured the fully integrated speech output necessary for a person with vision loss to access all features and functions independently. © Diabetes Technology Society.


Uslan M.,American Foundation for the Blind AFB Technology | Blubaugh M.,American Foundation for the Blind AFB Technology
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology | Year: 2010

In an article in this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Sherwyn Schwartz, M.D., presents a study to validate the design of the ClikSTAR® insulin pen from sanofi-aventis and demonstrates that the device can be used correctly by participants with diabetes. Concern with this article lies with the selection of participants, which was meant to reflect the intended audience for the insulin pen device but does not address the inclusion of visually impaired individuals, who comprise over 20% of the adult diabetes population. Visually impaired individuals need to be included as part of the intended audience for insulin administration technology, and manufacturers of these devices need to design their products for safe use by all people, including those who are visually impaired. The study demonstrated successful use of the ClikSTAR insulin pen in a population that did not include subjects with severe visual impairment. We believe that future validation studies for insulin administration technology should also include samples of visually impaired users and that visually impaired patients will embrace the use of insulin pens designed with their needs in mind. © Diabetes Technology Society.


PubMed | American Foundation for the Blind AFB Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of diabetes science and technology | Year: 2010

In 2004, Uslan and colleagues determined that insulin pumps (IPs) on the market were largely inaccessible to blind and visually impaired persons. The objective of this study is to determine if accessibility status changed in the ensuing 4 years.Five IPs on the market in 2008 were acquired and analyzed for key accessibility traits such as speech and other audio output, tactual nature of control buttons, and the quality of visual displays. It was also determined whether or not a blind or visually impaired person could independently complete tasks such as programming the IP for insulin delivery, replacing batteries, and reading manuals and other documentation.It was found that IPs have not improved in accessibility since 2004. None have speech output, and with the exception of the Animas IR 2020, no significantly improved visual display characteristics were found. Documentation is still not completely accessible.Insulin pumps are relatively complex devices, with serious health consequences resulting from improper use. For IPs to be used safely and independently by blind and visually impaired patients, they must include voice output to communicate all the information presented on their display screens. Enhancing display contrast and the size of the displayed information would also improve accessibility for visually impaired users. The IPs must also come with accessible user documentation in alternate formats.

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