American Enterprise Institute

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News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from Esteemed Lawyers of America: By Email Attorney Eschweiler’s extensive background makes him a knowledgeable, effective advocate for injury victims and other plaintiffs. His dedication to clients has been recognized by the legal and business communities in Nevada and across the nation. Among his many awards and honors, Mr. Eschweiler has been named a Top 100 Attorney by the National Trial Lawyers, named the Most Tenacious Litigator in Nevada by Corporate America’s Legal Elite magazine, and selected for the 10 Best in Client Satisfaction Award by the American Institute of Personal Injury Attorneys. Today, attorney Corey Eschweiler’s professional achievements are recognized by his admission to the Esteemed Lawyers of America (ELOA). Dedicated to honoring the nation’s most respected attorneys, ELOA is a professional legal group that serves as a dependable, trustworthy resource for consumers seeking high-quality legal representation. ELOA has developed a thoroughgoing screening and selection process that provides consumers with the names of only the most accomplished and respected attorneys in their communities. Lawyers recognized by the ELOA bring extraordinary legal training, talents, and expertise to their clients and communities. Attorney Corey Eschweiler is a native of Cedar Falls, Iowa. He graduated magna cum laude in 1995 from the University of Northern Iowa. He earned his Juris Doctor degree, with distinction, from the University of Iowa in 1998 and was admitted to the Nevada State Bar that same year. He has sat on the Executive Board of Directors for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Nevada, has been a Director for the Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation, and organizes the annual Las Vegas Lawyer Bowl, which has raised over $100,000 for children’s charities. Glen Lerner Injury Attorneys 4795 South Durango Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 89147 Phone: 702-307-4007 brian@ontargetmediainc.com https://glenlerner.com For more information contact: Esteemed Lawyers of America 2161 East County Road 540A, Suite 168 Lakeland, Florida 33813 (863) 638-5800 www.eloa.org Las Vegas, NV, May 13, 2017 --( PR.com )-- One of the nation’s leading trial lawyers has been selected for admission to the Esteemed Lawyers of America (ELOA). Corey M. Eschweiler is skilled at resolving the most complicated legal disputes. He has been litigating complex disputes since he became an attorney in 1998. Since 2010, as head of the Litigation Department at Glen Lerner Injury Attorneys, Mr. Eschweiler litigates and supervises every aspect of a variety of civil personal injury cases.Attorney Eschweiler’s extensive background makes him a knowledgeable, effective advocate for injury victims and other plaintiffs. His dedication to clients has been recognized by the legal and business communities in Nevada and across the nation. Among his many awards and honors, Mr. Eschweiler has been named a Top 100 Attorney by the National Trial Lawyers, named the Most Tenacious Litigator in Nevada by Corporate America’s Legal Elite magazine, and selected for the 10 Best in Client Satisfaction Award by the American Institute of Personal Injury Attorneys.Today, attorney Corey Eschweiler’s professional achievements are recognized by his admission to the Esteemed Lawyers of America (ELOA). Dedicated to honoring the nation’s most respected attorneys, ELOA is a professional legal group that serves as a dependable, trustworthy resource for consumers seeking high-quality legal representation. ELOA has developed a thoroughgoing screening and selection process that provides consumers with the names of only the most accomplished and respected attorneys in their communities. Lawyers recognized by the ELOA bring extraordinary legal training, talents, and expertise to their clients and communities.Attorney Corey Eschweiler is a native of Cedar Falls, Iowa. He graduated magna cum laude in 1995 from the University of Northern Iowa. He earned his Juris Doctor degree, with distinction, from the University of Iowa in 1998 and was admitted to the Nevada State Bar that same year. He has sat on the Executive Board of Directors for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Nevada, has been a Director for the Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation, and organizes the annual Las Vegas Lawyer Bowl, which has raised over $100,000 for children’s charities.Glen Lerner Injury Attorneys4795 South Durango DriveLas Vegas, Nevada 89147Phone: 702-307-4007brian@ontargetmediainc.comhttps://glenlerner.comFor more information contact:Esteemed Lawyers of America2161 East County Road 540A, Suite 168Lakeland, Florida 33813(863) 638-5800www.eloa.org Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Esteemed Lawyers of America


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Board of Directors of Arconic (NYSE: ARNC) today issued a letter to shareholders that includes a Q&A with the Arconic director nominees, in which they share their personal views and their objectives for the Company. Additional information, including the letter to shareholders and supplemental proxy materials, are available at www.arconic.com/annualmeeting. The Company urges shareholders to vote “FOR” the Company’s new slate of five director nominees and governance proposals on the NEW WHITE proxy card. The full text of the letter follows: At Arconic’s upcoming Annual Meeting of Shareholders on May 25, 2017, you will have the opportunity to elect five director candidates nominated by Arconic who we believe bring new perspectives, critical skills and a wealth of relevant expertise to Arconic’s Board of Directors. Three of our candidates are current Board members – none having served for more than 16 months – and two are entirely new and have not yet served on Arconic’s Board. We invite you to hear from the Arconic Director nominees to learn a little more about their personal views and their objectives regarding Arconic. The Board of Directors of Arconic Inc. You are Arconic’s newest director and were recently appointed Interim CEO. What has impressed you most about the Company? What do you see as its greatest challenge? I’ve been impressed by how thoroughly engaged and open-minded this Board is, as well as the range and balance of perspectives that the directors collectively bring to bear in our deliberations. Although I’ve only been on the Board for a little over two months, we’ve had numerous board sessions and frequent interactions. This has given me a good opportunity to see the group make some critical decisions and tackle tough issues – including addressing an inappropriate letter sent by our former CEO, recruiting new nominees to fill two open Board seats, contemplating the appropriate timing for the annual meeting in light of fast-changing circumstances, and engaging in settlement discussions with Elliott. I believe if you were in the boardroom along with us, you would observe a group of people who always act with the highest ethics and integrity and always with the best interests of the shareholder in mind. In terms of challenges going forward, perhaps the most critical task for Arconic right now is recruiting a new CEO. We’ve formed a search committee and are starting a deliberate and thorough process to select the perfect candidate with the right experience and capabilities to lead Arconic into the future. At the same time, we must remain relentlessly focused on meeting or exceeding the expectations of our customers and shareholders and on flawlessly executing our three-year plan. I am truly honored to serve as your interim CEO and to be able to lead Arconic through this challenging period. In the short time that I’ve been here at Arconic, I have been very impressed by the dedication of our employees and the support of our customers. With a strong first quarter, we’re off to a great start, and I look forward to what lies ahead. Why did you decide to join the new Arconic slate when it is in the middle of a proxy fight? You must have numerous other opportunities to serve on public company boards. I agreed to join the slate because I believe Arconic is an outstanding company with a strong values-based culture. As the President and CEO of Boeing’s Commercial Airplanes business, I experienced first-hand what it means to be one of Arconic’s customers. The Company stood out to me as a true partner that invests in growing areas and innovative technologies, and I believe the reputation and culture that Arconic has built up over time gives it a strong foundation for future growth. In addition, as a newly launched, standalone company, Arconic now has a more streamlined set of businesses with a strong focus on the aerospace and transportation industries. Given my background, this felt like an ideal opportunity for me to contribute my knowledge and expertise to a company where it is directly relevant and hopefully will have a real impact. I spent almost my entire career in the aerospace sector, and my perspective has been shaped not only by my years at Boeing but also as Chairman of the National Aeronautic Association and in my prior roles as President of the American Institute of Aeronautic and Astronautics and Chairman of the Aerospace Industries Association. I’ve had the opportunity to discuss the future of the commercial aerospace industry with a number of leaders, and I’m excited to help Arconic realize its full potential. You are new to the Board, having joined last November upon the launch of Arconic as a standalone company, following its separation from Alcoa Corp. What is it like to be part of a company going through so much change? We do have a lot of change underway – governance changes at the Board and CEO level, and operational changes as we are able to focus on our core business, post-separation. From my experience on other boards I know that, when making tough decisions, access to a diverse set of views is key to finding the best path. This Board was carefully constructed to include a wide range of experiences and perspectives. Arconic’s Board is a bit unique in that seven of us have joined in the past 16 months, and we are fortunate to benefit from the knowledge of the four directors with longer tenure. Personally, I am especially attracted to Arconic’s emphasis on technology and innovation, which have been the focus of my career. I served as the Director of the Special Projects Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), where we developed breakthrough innovations in support of national security. Later I was the Chief Technology Officer at one of the nation’s largest defense contractors. I know that successful innovation at a large company requires alignment from the boardroom through management to the front-line technologists, and it requires close, iterative collaboration with customers to ensure appropriate return on investment. From my experience in the defense and financial services sector, I also understand the evolving cyber security threat that Arconic is facing. As Arconic increases its criticality in the national-security supply chain, its Board will need to ensure the Company stays ahead of this threat. You were suggested for the Arconic Board by Elliott last year – how has your integration into the Board gone? Elliott obviously has confidence in your judgment and perspective as a director (it is not contesting your election this year) – with that in mind, do you feel that Elliott’s criticisms of the Board are warranted? Following my appointment to the Board, together with the other two directors who were also nominated by Elliott last year, it was immediately apparent that everyone on the Board has a voice and their views are respected. Our meetings are characterized by open debate, a free flow of ideas and the shared goal of doing what is right for the Company and the shareholders. So to answer your first question, the integration was seamless and there was no “us versus them” mentality or other tension between the Elliott nominees and the rest of the Board. Regarding your second question – I don't believe Elliott’s criticisms of the Board and its culture are supported by the facts. I have found that the Board is thoroughly engaged, values strong governance and the highest standards of ethical behavior, and actively evaluates and embraces changes that it believes make sense for the Company and are in the best interests of all constituents. Many of the governance changes that have recently been adopted were being contemplated prior to or in connection with the separation, well before Elliott launched its proxy fight. Janet C. Wolfenbarger New Nominee, to join at 2017 Annual Meeting As the Air Force’s first female four-star general, what makes you want to take on the challenge of serving on the Arconic Board? I’ve been fortunate to serve with exceptional teams throughout my career, both in the Air Force and post retirement, in my corporate board and federal advisory committee work, and I’ve been impressed with the caliber of the people who serve at Arconic. During my 35-year tenure in the U.S. Air Force, I oversaw an approximately $60 billion annual budget, including purchasing, which covered a large portion of the approximately $1 billion of business that Arconic does in the defense industry. Arconic operates in an important and very competitive industry, and it stands out to me as a leader in the space. Not only because the Company offers leading innovative technologies, but also because Arconic puts in the effort to maintain a dialogue with its customers in order to better understand and adapt to their wants and needs. I also have experienced firsthand the complexities that surround organizational transformations, which I feel gives me some insight into Arconic – itself the product of a transformation that is still underway. I understand that an ongoing commitment to excellence, efficiency, and cost effectiveness is integral to any organization’s success, particularly in the early years, and feel Arconic’s strategy of focusing its efforts on high-potential areas reflects that. Arconic (NYSE: ARNC) creates breakthrough products that shape industries. Working in close partnership with our customers, we solve complex engineering challenges to transform the way we fly, drive, build and power. Through the ingenuity of our people and cutting-edge advanced manufacturing techniques, we deliver these products at a quality and efficiency that ensure customer success and shareholder value. For more information: www.arconic.com. Follow @arconic: Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube. Arconic intends to make future announcements regarding Company developments and financial performance through its website at www.arconic.com. This communication contains statements that relate to future events and expectations and as such constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements include those containing such words as “anticipates,” “believes,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “forecasts,” “guidance,” “goal,” “intends,” “may,” “outlook,” “plans,” “projects,” “seeks,” “sees,” “should,” “targets,” “will,” “would,” or other words of similar meaning. All statements that reflect Arconic’s expectations, assumptions or projections about the future, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, forecasts relating to the growth of end markets and potential share gains; statements and guidance regarding future financial results or operating performance; and statements about Arconic’s strategies, outlook, business and financial prospects. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and it is possible that actual results may differ materially from those indicated by these forward-looking statements due to a variety of risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to: (a) deterioration in global economic and financial market conditions generally; (b) unfavorable changes in the markets served by Arconic; (c) the inability to achieve the level of revenue growth, cash generation, cost savings, improvement in profitability and margins, fiscal discipline, or strengthening of competitiveness and operations anticipated from restructuring programs and productivity improvement, cash sustainability, technology advancements, and other initiatives; (d) changes in discount rates or investment returns on pension assets; (e) Arconic’s inability to realize expected benefits, in each case as planned and by targeted completion dates, from acquisitions, divestitures, facility closures, curtailments, expansions, or joint ventures; (f) the impact of cyber attacks and potential information technology or data security breaches; (g) political, economic, and regulatory risks in the countries in which Arconic operates or sells products; (h) the outcome of contingencies, including legal proceedings, government or regulatory investigations, and environmental remediation; and (i) the other risk factors discussed in Arconic’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, and other reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Arconic disclaims any obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements, whether in response to new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by applicable law. Market projections are subject to the risks discussed above and other risks in the market.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

An insider’s view on how we got here — and what Trump can do about it. The Trump administration parked its get-tough rhetoric on trade with China to trumpet an agreement on beef and energy exports with Beijing, even as the White House continues to rail against supposed abuses by friendly countries like Mexico and Canada. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross touted the deal, which would open China’s market to U.S. beef exports after years of restrictions as a “herculean accomplishment.” President Donald Trump tweeted the virtues of the deal, calling it “real news!” And White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer started a contentious news briefing Friday by touting the merits of what he called the president’s fight for American jobs. In truth, the trade wins build on market openings already under way. Last fall, the Obama administration secured preliminary access to the Chinese market for U.S. beef exports, which had been disrupted for more than a decade because of the “mad cow” scare, but hadn’t finished the technical trade talks. And the new agreements also formalize the ability of China to import natural gas from the United States; China already imports significant volumes of U.S. liquefied natural gas. What’s more, the new agreements depend on highly undependable Chinese cooperation, one reason similar accords have been struck in vain in the past. However, the quick progress signals a more pragmatic approach by the administration to dealing with trade tensions between the two countries, after months of saber-rattling and talk of a trade war. The administration said the agreements were the fruit of a review carried out as a result of the meeting between Presidents Trump and Xi Jinping. The speedy conclusion heralds a welcome shift from the obsession with trade deficits that has defined the administration’s trade policy so far, said Derek Scissors, an expert on China’s economy at the American Enterprise Institute The problem is, the administration isn’t applying this approach across the board: It’s still haranguing key U.S. allies over negative trade balances. On May 4, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross called out Mexico and Japan for their trade surpluses with the United States, which he said were growing at “an alarming rate.” (Mexico’s trade surplus with the United States has widened in part because Trump’s Mexico-bashing rhetoric has lowered the value of the peso, which in turns boosts its exports and squeezes its imports.) “The United States can no longer sustain this inflated trade deficit with our closest trading partners,” Ross said in a press release. But Scissors said that hammering friends and neighbors over trade balances while glossing over it with rivals could be counterproductive. “If you think the problem is the trade deficit, you cannot chicken out on China and go after the small countries,” he said. “That is terrible policy – both in terms of trade and in terms of our diplomatic policy.” Last month, Trump vowed to terminate or renegotiate the South Korea free trade deal, which took effect just five years ago, calling it a “horrible” deal for the United States. And he came close to pulling the United States out of the North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada, before backing down after calls from Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. “The administration doesn’t seem to understand the context of the relationships,” Scissors argued. “Canada and Mexico are friends of the United States, and their trade practices are better than China’s.” Aside from easing restrictions on American beef and liquefied natural gas, Thursday’s agreement would lift restrictions to allow U.S. electronic payment processors to operate in China. Beijing would also grant licenses to two U.S. banks seeking to underwrite stock or bond offerings in China. On the Chinese side, the deal would open the U.S. market to cooked poultry imports from China and give Chinese banks operating in the U.S. the same regulatory and supervisory treatment as other banks. The agreement also says the United States “welcomes” investment from Chinese entrepreneurs – language important to Beijing amid rising concern in America that such investments could pose a national security threat. The issue now will be follow-through. China has a long history of formally granting market access but then effectively blocking it by controlling how Chinese firms conduct business, or by other informal restrictions on how foreign companies can operate. A case in point: Telecom ventures. In the negotiations leading to China’s accession to the World Trade Organization more than a decade ago, the United States fought for access to China’s telecom industry. To date, there have been no joint ventures of any significance between Chinese and American firms, according to Scissors.


WASHINGTON & SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--California Life Sciences Association (CLSA), the state’s premier public policy and business solutions organization representing the California life sciences industry, today commended the U.S. Senate’s confirmation of Scott Gottlieb, M.D., as the new commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). As the key federal agency responsible for protecting and promoting public health by regulating drugs, medical devices, food safety and other health-related products, the FDA plays a vital role in the development of all biopharmaceuticals and medical technologies. As such, the FDA’s work heavily impacts the pace at which innovation is driven in California’s life sciences industry as well as the delivery of life-changing medicines and technologies far beyond the state of California. “On behalf of the hundreds of life sciences organizations up and down the state we embody, California Life Sciences Association applauds the confirmation of Scott Gottlieb, M.D., as FDA Commissioner. Over the span of his distinguished career, Dr. Gottlieb has a proven track record as a strong advocate for both protecting public health and promoting biomedical innovation,” said Sara Radcliffe, President and CEO, California Life Sciences Association (CLSA). “More recently, Dr. Gottlieb’s prominent and respected participation on several public health and policy committees, including the Federal Health IT Policy Committee and the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, further confirm the breadth and depth of his experience and commitment to bringing life-saving innovations to patients in need. During his previous time at the FDA as a deputy commissioner, Dr. Gottlieb was a strong advocate for policies that supported an efficient and streamlined drug development and approval process, including supporting development of the Critical Path Initiative. With his experience in regulatory matters, and understanding of agency and industry needs, we are confident Dr. Gottlieb will be an exemplary leader for the FDA. We look forward to working with him and his team at the FDA to meet our shared goals,” added Radcliffe. Dr. Gottlieb previously served as the FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Medical and Scientific Affairs, a position he held from 2005 to 2007. He has also served as a senior policy advisor to the Administrator at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. He is a former member of the editorial staff of the British Medical Journal (BMJ), and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Dr. Gottlieb is currently a clinical assistant professor at New York University School of Medicine, and a resident fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute. California Life Sciences Association (CLSA) is the state’s largest and most influential life sciences advocacy and business leadership organization. With offices in Sacramento, San Diego, South San Francisco, Los Angeles and Washington DC, CLSA works closely with industry, government, academia and others to shape public policy, improve access to innovative technologies and grow California’s life sciences economy. CLSA serves biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical device and diagnostics companies, research universities and institutes, investors and service providers throughout the Golden State. CLSA was founded in 2015 when the Bay Area Bioscience Association (BayBio) and the California Healthcare Institute (CHI) merged. Visit CLSA at www.califesciences.org, and follow us on Twitter @CALifeSciences, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube.


-- Molly B. Schmid, Ph.D., consultant for TriTech Small Business Development Center (SBDC), has been inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). She was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows for "outstanding contributions to research, translational development of novel products in start-up companies and teaching of entrepreneurship and business."AIMBE is the authoritative voice and advocate for the value of medical and biological engineering to society. It is an organization of leaders in medical and biological engineering, consisting of academic, industrial, professional society councils and elected fellows.Dr. Schmid also is a member of the Inland Empire network of the Tech Coast Angels. She has specific expertise in early stage biotechnology companies, stemming from her own roles in scientific management, project leadership, and business development in three biotechnology companies.Her career has been about equally split between academia and industry. She was an assistant professor of Molecular Biology at Princeton University, and was also a professor and entrepreneur-in-residence at Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences in Claremont Calif., where she taught courses in drug discovery and entrepreneurship. Prior to KGI, she was senior vice president of Preclinical Programs at Affinium Pharmaceuticals in Toronto, and held leadership positions at Genencor International and Microcide Pharmaceuticals.Dr. Schmid's experiences with these companies included securing venture capital, securing and managing multi-year, multi-million dollar corporate partnerships with Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Daiichi Pharmaceuticals, and several other smaller pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, and playing leadership roles in growing and managing the scientific staff. These three biotech companies provided a wide range of experiences – two companies had IPO's, there were two compounds that entered clinical trials, and two companies ended in Chapter 11 reorganizations. She has nine issued U.S. patents, and several others pending while serving on numerous NSF and NIH grant review panels, and chairing a SBIR grant review panel for several years. She is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, a Searle Scholar, and a Damon-Runyon Fellow.About TriTech SBDCTriTech is a Small Business Development Center (SBDC) (www.tritechsbdc.org)that works with high technology high growth firms by offering no cost consulting and training to entrepreneurs and businesses looking for go-to-market strategies that will accelerate the growth of their enterprise. TriTech also provides trainings and workshops on topics that are relevant and valuable to the business community. TriTech has assembled a team of professionals who prepare you for the funding process. TriTech also provides high level referrals to service providers and resources who give companies a competitive advantage. All of TriTech's services are provided at no cost to small businesses.  For further information on TriTech SBDC, please contact Hanah Khaled at 951-571-6378 or hanahkhaled@ rccd.edu


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

IOWA CITY, IA, May 09, 2017-- Karim Abdel-Malek is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dr. Abdel-Malek a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Dr. Abdel-Malek celebrates many years' experience in his professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes he has accrued in his field.Dr. Abdel-Malek currently serves as the Senior Associate to the Provost, Director of the Center for Computer-Aided Design, a world renowned research center with 7 units and about 150 researchers, at the University of Iowa, and Professor with appointments in Biomedical, Mechanical, Industrial Engineering and Graduate Program in Applied Mathematics.Dr. Karim Abdel-Malek is internationally recognized in the areas of robotics and human simulation. He is the creator of SANTOS , the virtual soldier that is now being used by several services of the US Military (US Army, US Navy, and the US Marines). He has led many large-scale research programs for Ford, GM, Chrysler, Rockwell Collins, Caterpillar, and others. He received his MS and PhD in robotics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1990 and 1993, respectively, and his BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Jordan in 1988. He has published over 220 technical papers, a book, and serves on the board of three private companies.In addition to his status as a Lifetime Achiever, Dr. Abdel-Malek was inducted as a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biomedical Engineering, 2011, recipient of the State of Iowa Board of Regents Faculty Excellence Award for Research 2012, elected President of the International Society for Human Simulation (ISHS), received the Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer award from SME, and was a Fulbright Scholar from 1988 until 1990. Furthermore, he has been recognized in numerous Marquis Who's Who publications, including Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Science and Engineering and Who's Who in the World.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


SANTA ROSA, CA, May 09, 2017-- Dr. Douglas Fuerstenau has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.For more than six decades, Dr. Fuerstenau has met with success in the field of mineral engineering and education. His early technical interests led him to the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology where he received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1949, Master of Science degree from Montana School of Mines in 1950, and Doctor of Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1953. Dr. Fuerstenau came to prominence as an assistant professor at MIT, followed by being the mineral engineering section leader at the Metals Research Laboratory of Union Carbide Corporation, and then as manager of mineral engineering for Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation. In 1959 he joined the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where his main role was in teaching and research in mineral engineering. Through his inspiration, numerous students have achieved notable distinction in careers in academia, industry and government service. Noteworthy roles at Berkeley include chairman of the Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, director of the California Mining and Minerals Resources Research Institute, and longtime advisory committee chair for the Bancroft Mining Oral History program.Elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976, he is recognized internationally for his contributions to mineral processing and extractive metallurgy, and his research results are widely used and referenced extensively. Dr. Fuerstenau has been an active member of technical societies such as the American Institute of Mining, Metallugical and Petroleum Engineers, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the American Chemical Society, chairing or serving on committees and organizing symposia. He has served on numerous advisory boards to universities, international editorial boards, government committees and boards regarding mineral resources, and has contributed widely to international mineral resource programs. He has been a guest professor at Imperial College, London, and at the Universities of Karlsruhe and Clausthal, Germany, and is an honorary professor at the Central South University in Changsha, China, and also at the Huainan Institute of Technology.In recognition of his professional achievements, Dr. Fuerstenau has received many national and international awards, including the Alexander von Humboldt Senior American Scientist Award and the International Mineral Processing Congress Lifetime Achievement Award. He received honorary doctorates from the University of Liege and Lulea University. His international recognition also includes election to the engineering academies of Australia, India, the Russian Federation, and the Balkans. In addition, he was selected for inclusion into Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, Who's Who in the West, Who's Who in the World, and Who's Who in Finance and Industry.As he looks to the future, Dr. Fuerstenau continues to contribute to technical societies, universities, international conferences, editorial boards, research and publication, and to sustainable mineral projects.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


America, you have a new commissioner at the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, a 44-year-old physician, was confirmed by the Senate this week in a 57-42 vote. Many Democrats expressed concern about Gottlieb’s financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), who chaired the panel that forwarded the nomination to the Senate floor, countered that Gottlieb’s extensive experience in the drug industry would be an asset in his regulatory role. Here are four things you’ll want to know about Gottlieb. In his Senate confirmation hearings in early April, Gottlieb told senators that the epidemic of opiate drug abuse in the United States "is a public health emergency on the order of Ebola and Zika." On average, 91 Americans die each day of an opioid overdose. But the FDA’s power to reduce opioid drug use is limited. The agency’s past decisions have clearly contributed to overdose deaths. The FDA does not regulate physicians’ prescribing of drugs — an important contributor to Americans’ widespread opioid drug use (and subsequent addiction). All it can do is enforce legal limits on the marketing of drugs once they’ve been approved — strictures that drug manufacturers, in their bid to build their markets, routinely flout. The FDA also reviews new pain medications and new formulations of opioid-based drugs for the U.S. market. In considering whether to approve them, the agency walks a fine line between keeping pain medication available to those who need it and not creating new addicts. Some of the abuse-resistant formulations of opioid pain relievers approved for the market in recent years have driven many addicts to cheaper, more readily available street drugs such as heroin. In his April confirmation hearings, Gottlieb sought to defuse concerns that speeding up the drug approval process would allow less-safe medications to come to market. He called it a “false dichotomy that it all boils down to a choice between speed and safety.” He repeatedly called the FDA’s review process “the gold standard.” And he stopped short of endorsing proposals that had been floated by other candidates for the job, including plans to approve drugs after they had been tested for safety but before their effectiveness had been established. But he also said the FDA should “lean forward” to modernize and speed the approvals process. Gottlieb has long been a fan of what are known in the clinical-trial business as “adaptive trials.” Such human experiments, which are already in limited use, depart from what many scientists define as the “gold standard” in that their design, their study populations, and even their objectives can be altered along the way in response to early results. A drug company running a clinical trial might be allowed to increase or decrease the number of subjects assigned to different “arms” of a trial, or change who gets assigned to those arms, or how those assignments are made. The idea is that researchers could shift a clinical trial’s focus in response to early signs of a drug’s strength in, for instance, treating one population (people with very early Alzheimer’s disease, for instance) over another (say, those whose dementia has already progressed). Rather than conducting a lengthy and expensive series of separate trials to discover which patients might benefit most from a drug, a single adaptive trial could come to the same conclusion after only one study that was allowed to “flex” along the way. Gottlieb has been critical of President Trump’s key proposal to drive down the cost of prescription drugs: allowing their importation from countries that impose price controls. In a March 2016 article in Forbes, Gottlieb wrote that while Trump’s plan is “perhaps good politics,” it will “offer consumers little relief.” Drug manufacturers would be unlikely to cooperate because increasing their output of production lines abroad would undermine their own interests. And it’s just as unlikely that other countries would stand for having their medications “skimmed off, only to create local shortages of important medicines,” he wrote. In its central mission of evaluating the safety and effectiveness of drugs and granting companies the right to market them in the United States, the FDA is not permitted to take price into consideration. But the FDA’s power over the approval of generic drugs is a key lever for bringing down the cost of drugs, and Gottlieb has said he wants to see improvements there. The company that makes a drug has exclusive rights to the U.S. market for three to seven years after it is granted FDA approval. But once that protection ends, any drug company can seek FDA approval to market a generic version by proving it can manufacture the active drug ingredient and package it for human use safely and reliably. The result: competition that typically drives drug prices down steeply. So driving down the cost of many prescription drugs will require the FDA’s Office of Generic Drugs to be staffed adequately to speed approval of drug applications. That’s a tall order against the backdrop of the Trump administration’s proposed budget cuts to the Department of Health and Human Services, the FDA’s parent agency. Also, many drugs — including a broad new category of drugs known as “biologics” — are less simple to copy. The FDA’s cautious approach to approving generic versions of many of these drugs — widely used to treat cancers and autoimmune diseases — threatens to create “monopolies in perpetuity,” Gottlieb has said. If prescription drug prices are to drop, he said, the rules for approving those complex generic drugs need to be rewritten. Gottlieb is a cancer survivor, having been successfully treated for Hodgkin’s lymphoma. That experience prompted Gottlieb to become a cancer policy advisor for the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship. The coalition, in turn, strongly endorsed his nomination to head the FDA. In a statement issued when Trump nominated him in mid-March, the coalition said that Gottlieb “understands the human toll cancer takes on individuals and families, during both treatment and long-term survivorship. He is open to a wide range of perspectives, including those of the patients whose lives depend on a strong FDA.” Gottlieb is a physician. He trained at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York and completed his residency in internal medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. But his interest in the business and economics of medicine has been a more salient and recurring theme in his career than direct patient care. After graduating from Wesleyan University in Connecticut, Gottlieb worked as a healthcare analyst at the investment bank Alex. Brown & Sons in Baltimore, and then went to medical school. Between 2003 and 2007, Gottlieb served the Bush administration in a wide range of positions at the FDA and in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Among his titles: deputy FDA commissioner for medical and scientific affairs. At the FDA, he helped develop standards for drug cocktails to be used for HIV treatment. He also helped draft strategic plans for U.S. biodefense countermeasures as a member of the White House Biodefense Interagency Working Group. Since 2007, he has been a venture partner at New Enterprise Associates, focusing on healthcare and medical devices investments, and a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank. He’s also been a clinical assistant professor at New York University School of Medicine and practiced medicine as an attending physician at Stamford Hospital in Connecticut. He has said he'd divest himself of medical company stocks and recuse himself for a year from decisions involving nearly two dozen companies, including Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Daiichi Sankyo Inc. and GlaxoSmithKline. Speed up drug approvals at FDA? It's already faster than Europe's drug agency Dying patients want easier access to experimental drugs. Here's why experts say that's bad medicine The odds of a drug having a significant safety issue after winning FDA approval are nearly 1 in 3, study finds

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