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News Article | February 4, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The latest scientific statement from the American Heart Association is yet another confirmation that breakfast is, in fact, the most important meal of the day. Sufficient scientific evidence suggests that people who eat breakfast daily are less likely to have high cholesterol and high blood pressure, which are well-recognized risk factors for heart disease. On the contrary, those who skip breakfast were found to be obese, inadequately nourished, have impaired glucose metabolism, and diabetes. Interestingly, breakfast can also work wonders for a child's performance in school. A 2005 Journal of the American Dietetic Association review of 47 breakfast-related studies found that eating breakfast is likely to improve cognitive function related to memory, test grades, and school attendance. Oatmeal is a mainstay of most heart-healthy diets. Its soluble fibers, according to the National Institutes of Health, reduce the absorption of cholesterol into the bloodstream and lower levels of low-density lipoprotein or LDL, also known as the "bad" cholesterol. But let's be honest, eating oatmeal every single day can become boring in the long run. Spice up your mornings with these yummier and healthier oatmeal alternatives: Frequently, amaranth gets mistaken as a grain — it is, in fact, a seed — because of its texture and nutrient profile. It is loaded with essential nutrients like iron, potassium, calcium, and protein. Amaranth is good for the heart, because it contains phytosterols, which studies suggest have cholesterol-lowering properties. To prepare this nutty substitute for oatmeal, boil a cup of amaranth seeds on a stove top and pair with your favorite slices of fruit for a hearty breakfast. Filled with all the fiber goodness, wheat berries can keep you going beyond lunch time. They contain substantial amounts of thiamine (which helps support nerve and heart health) and antioxidant-packed vitamin E (which helps cells fight damaging free radicals). Start your day right by adding a quarter cup of wheat berries, flaxseeds, and honey into 1 cup of plain yogurt. Teff is an ancient grain originally grown in Abyssinia and more recently in Ethiopia. It is considered the smallest grain in the world. It's so small, it's impossible to process or refine. An amazing superfood that can bring you a combination of benefits, teff is gluten-free, high in iron, and high in protein plus eight essential amino acids necessary for the body's growth and repair. It's low in sodium, making it an ideal candidate for a heart-healthy diet. Like cooking porridge, boil teff for 10 to 15 minutes and season with a pinch of salt. Spelt, like other high-fiber food, is linked to a lower risk of obesity, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. It also has manganese (which supports bone health) and zinc (which can help boost your immune system) For a no-fuss breakfast fix, combine spelt berries, boiled oats, almond milk, granola, and your favorite fruits together. Drizzle with a bit of maple syrup or honey if you want it a tad sweeter. The United Nations didn't name 2013 as the "International Quinoa Year" for nothing. A staple component of the diet of the ancient Incas, quinoa seeds have small amounts of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and have rich deposits of anti-inflammatory phytonutrients, which make them valuable for the prevention and treatment of diseases. For a healthy but hassle-free breakfast, cook quinoa in a sauce pan for five minutes. Add almond milk, cinnamon sticks, nutmeg, and a pinch of salt. Sprinkle with fresh berries and nuts if you like. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Spence L.A.,American Dietetic Association | Cifelli C.J.,National Dairy Council | Cifelli C.J.,Dairy Research Institute | Miller G.D.,National Dairy Council | Miller G.D.,Dairy Research Institute
Current Nutrition and Food Science | Year: 2011

Overweight and obesity are major public health concerns with approximately 32% and 17% of U.S. children aged 2 - 19 being classified as overweight or obese, respectively. While the cause of overweight and obesity is multifactorial, changes in eating habits and physical activity patterns have been proposed as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic. For example, the displacement of nutrient rich foods and beverages with non-nutrient dense items may be influencing childhood obesity. Many children do not consume the recommended servings of the Food Groups to Encourage, i.e. low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains identified by the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans which results in low intakes of calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E. While attention has focused primarily on reducing energy intake and/or increasing energy expenditure for weight maintenance, a promising beneficial role for dairy products in weight management has emerged. Most research has focused on adults, but there is evidence in children and adolescents indicating either a beneficial or neutral effect of dairy food consumption on body weight or body composition. The current review provides and assessment of the scientific evidence on the effects of dairy food consumption on body weight and body composition in children and adolescents. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.


Trademark
Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics and American Dietetic Association | Date: 2012-10-23

electronic publications, namely, journals in the field of nutrition and health. publications, namely, journals in the field of nutrition and health.


Trademark
Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics and American Dietetic Association | Date: 2012-08-14

printed publications, namely, newsletters, magazines, professional journals, pamphlets, brochures, charts, guides in the field of food, nutrition and health. association services, namely, promoting the interests of nutrition and dietetic professionals; market research services. educational services, namely, conducting conferences, seminars, workshops and meetings in the field of food, nutrition and health; organizing educational conferences in the field of food, nutrition and health.


Trademark
Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics and American Dietetic Association | Date: 2011-08-30

electronic downloadable publications, namely magazines in the field of food, nutrition and health. printed publications, namely magazines in the field of food, nutrition and health. electronic non-downloadable publications, namely magazines in the field of food, nutrition and health.


And

Trademark
Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics and American Dietetic Association | Date: 2011-08-31

printed publications, namely, newsletters, magazines, professional journals, pamphlets, brochures, charts, guides in the field of food, nutrition and health. association services, namely, promoting the interests of nutrition and dietetic professionals; market research services. educational services, namely, conducting conferences, seminars, workshops and meetings in the field of food, nutrition and health; organizing educational conferences in the field of food, nutrition and health.


Trademark
Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics and American Dietetic Association | Date: 2011-10-11

printed publications, namely, newsletters, magazines, professional journals, pamphlets, brochures, charts, guides in the field of food, nutrition and health. association services, namely, promoting the interests of nutrition and dietetic professionals; market research services. educational services, namely, conducting conferences, seminars, workshops and meetings in the field of food, nutrition and health; organizing educational conferences in the field of food, nutrition and health.


Trademark
Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics and American Dietetic Association | Date: 2011-11-21

printed publications, namely, newsletters, magazines, professional journals, pamphlets, brochures, charts, guides in the field of food, nutrition and health. association services, namely, promoting public awareness of nutrition and health issues, promoting interests of dietitians through disseminating information, in the form of brochures and informational bulletins, to health care professionals, administrators, policy makers and the public. educational services, namely, conducting conferences, seminars, workshops and meetings in the field of food, nutrition and health; organizing educational conferences in the field of food, nutrition and health.


Trademark
Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics and American Dietetic Association | Date: 2011-11-21

printed publications, namely, newsletters, magazines, professional journals, pamphlets, brochures, charts, guides in the field of food, nutrition and health. association services, namely, promoting public awareness of nutrition and health issues, promoting interests of dietitians through disseminating information, in the form of brochures and informational bulletins, to health care professionals, administrators, policy makers and the public. educational services, namely, conducting conferences, seminars, workshops and meetings in the field of food, nutrition and health; organizing educational conferences in the field of food, nutrition and health.


Trademark
Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics and American Dietetic Association | Date: 2012-10-02

Electronic publications, namely, newsletters, manuals, guidelines, and fact sheets, and educational materials, namely, workbooks, textbooks, and manuals, to promote acceptance, coverage, compliance, and reimbursement for dietetic health care recorded on computer media and in downloadable format. Printed publications in the nature of newsletters, manuals, guides and fact sheets and educational materials, namely, workbooks, textbooks, and manuals, to promote acceptance, coverage, compliance, and reimbursement for dietetic health care. Educational services, namely, conferences, workshops, seminars to promote acceptance, coverage, compliance, and reimbursement for dietetic health care.

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