Farmington Hills, MI, United States

American Concrete Institute

www.concrete.org/
Farmington Hills, MI, United States

The American Concrete Institute is a non-profit technical society and standard developing organization . ACI was founded in 1904 and its headquarters are currently located in Farmington Hills, Michigan, USA. ACI's mission is "ACI develops and disseminates consensus-based knowledge on concrete and its uses." Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Tindall Corporation is honored to be recognized as the Virginia ACI (American Concrete Institute) 2016 award winner for Stone Brewery. Located in Richmond, Virginia, Stone Brewery is a 220,000-square foot facility that produces 600,000 barrels of craft beer per year. By using precast panel construction for the exterior walls, the team was able to erect the steel and place the 79,000-square feet of Insulated Precast Cladding Panels around the entire 216,000-square foot building in less than 4 weeks. “We worked quickly and diligently to complete the design and construction on time,” said Greg Force, President and COO of Tindall Corporation. "Stone Brewery is just one example of what Tindall is capable of creating with high-quality precast. We look forward to a future of further innovation and creativity utilizing precast concrete and thank the Virginia ACI Chapter panel of judges for this recognition.” Stone Brewery is located in the heart of Richmond, Virginia. The building architecture brings a mix of raw industrial and modern style that maintains the roots of the Richmond Tobacco Warehouse and is consistent with Stone’s culture. The exposed steel, reclaimed wood and stained concrete finish is a testament to the natural surroundings. The ACI Virginia Chapter has served its local concrete community for 29 years. The chapter is the local sponsoring group for concrete strength testing, concrete aggregates testing, and Flatwork Finisher Certifications. In addition to locally produced programs, the chapter also sponsors ACI International Technical Seminars in the state. Headquartered in Spartanburg, South Carolina, Tindall Corporation is one of North America’s largest precast concrete companies with five locations providing design, manufacture, and installation of precast prestressed concrete structural systems, architectural cladding systems, and underground utility structures. In 2015, Tindall ranked 5th in Engineering News-Record’s (ENR) Top 20 Specialty Concrete Contractors in the United States list and 77th overall in ENR’s Top 600 Specialty Contractors list. Learn more about Tindall Corporation and connect with us on Facebook @TindallCorp, LinkedIn @TindallCorporation, Twitter @TindallPrecast and Instagram @tindall.corporation.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Surrounded by water above and below-ground, International Paper’s paper mill in Savannah, Georgia (U.S.A.), specified PENETRON ADMIX to protect the new foundation structures of the plant’s latest upgrade that went online in March 2017. When confronted with a project exposed to groundwater and seawater, adding a crystalline admixture to the concrete makes the concrete waterproof and promotes active self-healing of cracks. It is also more economical and environmentally friendly than manipulating the water/cement ratio or traditional membrane solutions. PENETRON’s crystalline admixture has recently been used successfully in similar brackish water conditions in a number of water management projects in the Florida Everglades. The newest upgrade at International Paper’s (IP) Savannah, Georgia, paper mill was a new feed conveyor system used in the production of linerboard, a type of heavy paper stock. Because of the site’s high water table and proximity to the saltwater of the adjacent Intracoastal Waterway, the concrete for the foundation slab needed to be waterproof and resistant to saltwater to prevent any possible corrosion of the slab’s steel reinforcement elements. In their November 2010 “Report on Chemical Admixtures for Concrete” (ACI 212.3R-10), the American Concrete Institute (ACI) underlines the advantages of a crystalline waterproofing solution as “a superior product to reduce permeability in concrete under hydrostatic pressure (compared to hydrophobic pore blockers and colloidal silica) and thereby significantly increases the durability and life span of concrete structures.” Argos USA, the ready-mix supplier, added PENETRON ADMIX in soluble bags to the concrete during the batching phase. PENETRON ADMIX soluble bags dissolve instantly during mixing and are pre-measured for easy batching. They also incorporate the PENETRON innovation, a fugitive green tracer in the bleedwater. This tracer confirms that PENETRON is “in the mix” at the time of pour without staining or coloring the concrete. “Technical upgrades and new equipment installations are a regular occurrence at the Savannah paper mill,” says Christopher Chen, Director of The PENETRON Group. “Our crystalline waterproofing technology was selected for this recent expansion because it has a proven track record for quality results and ease of use in all its applications, including its particular efficiency when used in construction located in close proximity to bodies of water.” The PENETRON Group is a leading manufacturer of specialty construction products for concrete waterproofing, concrete repairs and floor preparation systems. The Group operates through a global network, offering support to the design and construction community through its regional offices, representatives and distribution channels. For more information on PENETRON waterproofing solutions, please visit penetron(dot)com or Facebook(dot)com/ThePenetronGroup, email CRDept(at)penetron(dot)com, or contact the Corporate Relations Department at 631-941-9700.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The first phase of construction on the South Quarter office towers, completed in February 2017, is benefitting from PENETRON ADMIX, which was used to treat all concrete in the extensive basement structures underlying the towers. Even in the extreme wet and humid jungle-type conditions of Indonesia, PENETRON technology provides concrete with effective resistance that enhances durability. “PENETRON ADMIX is the world’s most efficient and economic permeability-reducing concrete admixture (PRAH), as defined by tests of the American Concrete Institute (ACI),” explains Jozef Van Beeck, International Sales & Marketing Director of The PENETRON Group. “Our crystalline admixture provides comprehensive protection against concrete deterioration caused by water penetration, chemical attack and corrosion, while withstanding high hydrostatic pressure." This multi-purpose complex, comprised of three office towers and two residential towers (to be completed in a second phase of construction), stretches over a 7.2 hectare (17.8 acres) area. Each floor of the 20-story towers offers 2,200 m2 (23,700 square feet) of space; at ground level, an extensive retail area – under the roof of the SQ Dome – features restaurants, convenience stores and other shops. “The four-story basement underlying the towers contains more shops and a three-level parking garage. The below-grade structures are exposed to a water table with high hydrostatic pressure, which posed a waterproofing challenge for this project,” adds Mr. Van Beeck. “To ensure complete protection and durability, PENETRON ADMIX was specified for the retaining walls and basement slabs.” The crystalline admixture was mixed into about 20,000 m3 (26,160 cubic yards) of concrete during the batching phase. PENEBAR SW-55 waterstops were installed to permanently seal the construction joints. Finally, all restrooms, balconies and roof structures of the South Quarter complex, about 43,900m2 (472,600 square feet) of concrete, were treated with a topical application of PENETRON, an integral crystalline waterproofing material that is ideal for waterproofing and chemical protection of concrete structures. Designed by Tom Wright of WKK, a UK-based architectural office, the traditional Indonesian rattan basket-inspired towers of the South Quarter complex are optimally positioned and laid out to exploit cooling winds and sunlight to reduce traditional energy use by 35%. The certified green development also includes further sustainable features, such as rainwater harvesting and wastewater recycling. The PENETRON Group is a leading manufacturer of specialty construction products for concrete waterproofing, concrete repairs and floor preparation systems. The Group operates through a global network, offering support to the design and construction community through its regional offices, representatives and distribution channels. For more information on PENETRON waterproofing solutions, please visit penetron(dot)com or Facebook(dot)com/ThePenetronGroup, email CRDept(at)penetron(dot)com, or contact the Corporate Relations Department at 631-941-9700.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

FEDERAL WAY, WA, May 12, 2017-- Thomas E. Gates has featured in numerous editions of Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Mr. Gates parlays his knowledge into his roles as a civil engineer, researcher, waste management administrator and lawyer. He has served the people of his community not only in law, but served politically for two terms on the City Council and Mayor for the City of Richland. He is dedicated to serving the people of Washington State, and was the King County Bar Association's Volunteer Legal Services Attorney of the Year in 2004. He has repeatedly been identified as a Rising Star by Washington Super Lawyers. He started his career by serving as a state inspector, field supervisor and consultant for Riley County Public Works, after which he earned a Bachelor of Science from Kansas State University. His degree propelled him to join his alma mater as a graduate research assistant for two years before he earned a Master of Science from the institution. Backed by a strong educational foundation, Mr. Gates began working for Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories as an engineer, research engineer and senior research engineer between 1981 and 1986. He then joined BWIP for two years, Westinghouse Hanford Co. for five years, Sonalysts for three years, and PLG, Inc., for a year. After garnering experience in a number of different roles, he furthered his knowledge by earning a JD from Seattle University in 2001. He opened his practice, Gates Law PLLC, in 2004. His areas of expertise are in estate planning and probate, personal injury, and small business. In 2014, he was nationally ranked among the Top 10 Under 40 Attorneys by the National Academy of Criminal Defense Attorneys and he holds a Preeminent 5.0 out of 5.0 Martindale-Hubbell rating. In 2015, he was the recipient of the Excellence in Legal Services Award from the U.S. Commerce & Trade Research Institute.Mr. Gates is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Concrete Institute, the King County Bar Association, and the Knights of Columbus. Throughout his career, he has contributed his extensive knowledge into seven different articles and 14 technical reports. In recognition of his efforts, he was named Outstanding Young Man of America in 1978, and was named one of Washington's Rising Stars through Super Lawyers. Additionally, he has been named to Who's Who of Emerging Leaders in America once, Who's Who in Science and Engineering eight times, and Who's Who in America 14 times. Looking forward, Mr. Gates intends to experience the continued growth and success of his career.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


Lamanna A.J.,Eastern Kentucky University | Lamanna A.J.,American Concrete Institute
ACI Materials Journal | Year: 2017

Concrete screw anchors can be susceptible to stress-induced hydrogen embrittlement cracking because they are case hardened and often coated. Hydrogen attack can result in decreased tensile ductility and decreased fracture stress at the root, which is where the threads meet the core. Currently, Acceptance Criteria 193 (AC 193) requires that two types of tests are conducted to qualify screw fasteners for stress-induced hydrogen embrittlement cracking under service conditions: 1) Method A, which is a test subjecting a concrete screw installed in concrete to a sustained tensile load while in an aggressive environment; and 2) Method B, which is a bending test on the threaded portion of the fastener while in an aggressive environment. This study examines Method A and Method B qualification test data obtained from three manufacturers for five different diameters and 11 different lengths. The comparison of the test results for the two methods shows that Method B is a redundant test, resulting in no additional safety or information beyond that gained from Method A. Copyright © 2017, American Concrete Institute. All rights reserved.


Soltani M.,Clemson University | Ross B.E.,American Concrete Institute
ACI Materials Journal | Year: 2017

A database of interface shear-transfer experiments on uncracked reinforced concrete specimens was created from published test results. A total of 774 tests were reviewed, with data coming from tests conducted between 1969 and 2014. Once compiled, the database was used to evaluate the accuracy of the interface shear transfer provisions from the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications, Eurocode 2, and CSA A23.3. Through this evaluation, it was determined that experimental capacities were an average of 1.49, 1.93, and 2.83 times greater than the code-calculated nominal capacities for the LRFD, Eurocode, and CSA codes, respectively. While each of the codes was conservative on average, the degree of conservatism was found to be dependent on design variables such as concrete compressive strength, amount of interface reinforcement, and member size. For example, conservatism of LRFD was lowest for specimens having concrete compressive strengths less than 60 MPa (87 ksi). Conditions associated with the lowest degrees of conservatism are identified and discussed. Copyright © 2017, American Concrete Institute. All rights reserved.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The invention, under development by a Ph.D. candidate, would sit underground to not block water views BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Jorge Cueto was running a successful consulting and construction company in Bogota, Colombia, and teaching civil engineering in a university five years ago, but he felt the need to do more. He wanted something new. "I wrote on the application for the Fulbright scholarship what I was trying to do. I was looking for something new, but I didn't know what it was," he said. He won the scholarship, and by a fortunate coincidence -- one of his favorite professors in Bogota had graduated from the University at Buffalo -- he came to UB. After finishing his master's degree and writing his PhD thesis, Cueto recently won UB's Engineering & Applied Sciences Outstanding Young Alumnus Award. The award is a recognition of outstanding contributions to his career field and comes after a long struggle to win support for his invention, which is also the subject of his thesis: a telescoping structural system. Cueto devised a patent-pending system of telescoping rectangular fiber-reinforced concrete boxes that he hopes will be the basis for "rise on demand" flood walls. The walls can be installed below ground level, so as not to block any water views, and can be raised when the threat of flooding occurs. His invention, called Smart Walls, won a $225,000 Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Science Foundation. He had earlier won $8,000 in seed funding from the Entrepreneurial Lab, a joint effort of the university's School of Management; Office of Science, Technology Transfer and Economic Outreach; and the undergraduate Entrepreneurship Academy to get the project going. The inspiration for the telescoping walls came in an emerging technologies class. The assignment was to identify a problem and then design a solution. "I was literally sitting at my desk in my apartment. I am usually very efficient with space, to optimize its use. When I started thinking of the hollow space inside massive columns. You're not using that space, and I was playing with an umbrella," he recalled. The idea clicked, and he started designing a telescopic structure. Cueto, 34, entered numerous business contests in search of money for his fledgling company, Smart Walls Construction LLC. But success eluded him until he received the NSF award. "The NSF grant was the last straw for me. It allows the company to have a real prototype to be tested and shown to potential clients and investors," Cueto said. Now his company is occupying space in the UB business incubator on Sweet Home Road in Amherst, New York, and he will continue his research and his fight to launch the company. He is devising a system of gaskets to keep water from entering the walls, which are built of a highly fibrous concrete for extra strength. Expandable flaps that will cover the space between the walls are also being designed. Andre Filiatrault, PhD, and Amjad Aref, PhD, both professors in the Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering Department, have been Cueto's thesis advisors. Both professors knew Cueto was looking to commercialize his idea, but they insisted he not go light on scientific aspects of his thesis. "We insisted on that," Filiatrault said. "What I admire about Jorge is that he did not shortchange the scientific aspect of his PhD dissertation." Aref concurred. "Jorge is very industrious, and importantly, possesses very positive attitude toward his work," Aref said. "I hold him in high regard, and wish him all the success in running his company." In addition to winning the NSF grant, which Filiatrault called almost unprecedented for a student, Cueto is a rare as a civil engineer seeking to develop a business. "In civil engineering it's much harder to start companies, because the structures we are using are often public structures," Filiatrault said. "Most of our PhD graduates become faculty members or consulting engineers." Cueto has presented the walls at a meeting of the American Concrete Institute's Strategic Development Council, and had interest from seafront towns. The walls could be useful to protect private property and hospitals, which cannot have access permanently blocked. Cueto said his professors were supportive of his business plans, but held him to very strict academic standards in his thesis. "They were very strict on the scientific and technical aspects, and they were right. Innovative structural systems have to be based on strong science," he said. And Filiatrault notes one bit of irony in Cueto's success. "Now with this NSF grant, Professor Aref and I became consultants on his company, so we are working for him now."


Kesner K.,American Concrete Institute
Forensic Engineering 2015: Performance of the Built Environment - Proceedings of the 7th Congress on Forensic Engineering | Year: 2015

Evaluation and/or repair of existing concrete buildings can be challenging to design professionals, owners, building officials, and contractors. Difficulties arise due to a myriad of questions pertaining to the necessary extent of repairs, responsibilities during the project, and uncertainties regarding the governing code requirements. The concept of a building code for repair of existing concrete structures has been discussed for nearly thirty years. However, a major obstacle to the development of a concrete repair code was how it would interact with existing codes, such as ACI 318, general building codes and the International Building Code (IBC) that were developed primarily for the use during new construction. The development of the International Existing Building Code (IEBC) has provided design professionals a pathway delineating code requirements for repair and alterations of existing structures. ACI 562 was developed to work both with the IEBC and as a stand-alone code to provide design professionals a code for the repair of existing concrete buildings. © 2016 ASCE.


(PRLEAP.COM) January 27, 2017 - Bob Moore Construction has broken ground on a 350,000 SF Interpoint distribution center in Wilmer, Texas on behalf of Houston, Texas developer Skyhawk Partners.The new speculative space distribution center will be located along the I-45 frontage road in Wilmer. Built with tilt-up construction, this cross-dock distribution facility will feature a 32' clear height, with decorative finishing and aluminum composite panel canopies at the exterior."We're pleased to be returning to Wilmer for another distribution center project," said Andrew Levchak, Project Manager for Bob Moore Construction. "The building should present a dramatic visual impact, with outstanding shipping access to I-45."Construction is currently in the sitework phase. The new distribution center is planned for completion later in 2017.Now Celebrating 70 years of construction excellence in Texas and around the United States!A recipient of the QUOIN / AGC General Contractor of the Year Award, the TEXO / AGC Summit Award for Construction Excellence and the Texas Building Branch-AGC Outstanding Construction Award, Bob Moore Construction has been one of the most respected commercial construction companies in Texas since 1946. An industry leader in tilt-up construction, the company was the first general contractor in the United States to be formally certified as a TCA Certified Company by the Tilt-up Concrete Association (TCA). Bob Moore Construction was also one of the first general contractors in North Texas to be accepted into the OSHA Local Partnership program in recognition of its superior safety program. The company's portfolio includes a wide range of commercial buildings, from warehouses and distribution centers to office buildings and retail stores. Whether it is providing general contractor, design / build or construction management services, Bob Moore Construction's goal remains the same: to deliver quality construction projects on time and in budget. Bob Moore Construction is a member of TEXO / Associated General Contractors of America, American Concrete Institute and a sustaining member of the TCA.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: phys.org

"I wrote on the application for the Fulbright scholarship what I was trying to do. I was looking for something new, but I didn't know what it was," he said. He won the scholarship, and by a fortunate coincidence—one of his favorite professors in Bogota had graduated from the University at Buffalo—he came to UB. After finishing his master's degree and writing his PhD thesis, Cueto recently won UB's Engineering & Applied Sciences Outstanding Young Alumnus Award. The award is a recognition of outstanding contributions to his career field and comes after a long struggle to win support for his invention, which is also the subject of his thesis: a telescoping structural system. Cueto devised a patent-pending system of telescoping rectangular fiber-reinforced concrete boxes that he hopes will be the basis for "rise on demand" flood walls. The walls can be installed below ground level, so as not to block any water views, and can be raised when the threat of flooding occurs. His invention, called Smart Walls, won a $225,000 Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Science Foundation. He had earlier won $8,000 in seed funding from the Entrepreneurial Lab, a joint effort of the university's School of Management; Office of Science, Technology Transfer and Economic Outreach; and the undergraduate Entrepreneurship Academy to get the project going. The inspiration for the telescoping walls came in an emerging technologies class. The assignment was to identify a problem and then design a solution. "I was literally sitting at my desk in my apartment. I am usually very efficient with space, to optimize its use. When I started thinking of the hollow space inside massive columns. You're not using that space, and I was playing with an umbrella," he recalled. The idea clicked, and he started designing a telescopic structure. Cueto, 34, entered numerous business contests in search of money for his fledgling company, Smart Walls Construction LLC. But success eluded him until he received the NSF award. "The NSF grant was the last straw for me. It allows the company to have a real prototype to be tested and shown to potential clients and investors," Cueto said. Now his company is occupying space in the UB business incubator on Sweet Home Road in Amherst, New York, and he will continue his research and his fight to launch the company. He is devising a system of gaskets to keep water from entering the walls, which are built of a highly fibrous concrete for extra strength. Expandable flaps that will cover the space between the walls are also being designed. Andre Filiatrault, PhD, and Amjad Aref, PhD, both professors in the Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering Department, have been Cueto's thesis advisors. Both professors knew Cueto was looking to commercialize his idea, but they insisted he not go light on scientific aspects of his thesis. "We insisted on that," Filiatrault said. "What I admire about Jorge is that he did not shortchange the scientific aspect of his PhD dissertation." Aref concurred. "Jorge is very industrious, and importantly, possesses very positive attitude toward his work," Aref said. "I hold him in high regard, and wish him all the success in running his company." In addition to winning the NSF grant, which Filiatrault called almost unprecedented for a student, Cueto is a rare as a civil engineer seeking to develop a business. "In civil engineering it's much harder to start companies, because the structures we are using are often public structures," Filiatrault said. "Most of our PhD graduates become faculty members or consulting engineers." Cueto has presented the walls at a meeting of the American Concrete Institute's Strategic Development Council, and had interest from seafront towns. The walls could be useful to protect private property and hospitals, which cannot have access permanently blocked. Cueto said his professors were supportive of his business plans, but held him to very strict academic standards in his thesis. "They were very strict on the scientific and technical aspects, and they were right. Innovative structural systems have to be based on strong science," he said. And Filiatrault notes one bit of irony in Cueto's success. "Now with this NSF grant, Professor Aref and I became consultants on his company, so we are working for him now." Explore further: Upper Paleolithic humans may have hunted cave lions for their pelts

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