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News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) will be hosting the first ever Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week, April 24-30th, 2017. -- (Rockville, MD) April 19, 2017 – The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) will be hosting the first ever Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week April 24th to 30th, 2017. This national awareness week will be dedicated to recognizing the significant gap in treatment for those with the disease of addiction.The statistics which reflect the severity of the treatment gap are staggering. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment."ASAM has been dedicated to helping physicians treat addiction and save lives since 1954. The first ever ABPM addiction medicine exam is the catalyst for moving addiction into mainstream medicine," said Kelly Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, President of ASAM. "Certifying more addiction medicine physicians and educating the public can help close the treatment gap and ensure that patients receive the care they need."Addiction medicine was recognized as an American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) subspecialty in 2016, and the first-ever addiction medicine certification exam from the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) will certify physicians in this subspecialty and offer them the unique ability to treat those with addiction. The ABPM addiction medicine exam will allow physicians to become board-certified in addiction medicine and will help close the treatment gap. ASAM is working diligently to promote this opportunity to as many physicians as possible. For a limited time period, ABMS board-certified physicians may qualify to take the exam by either meeting practice experience requirements or completing an addiction medicine fellowship.During Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week, ASAM is hosting an informational webinar on April 25th with experts from federal organizations and ABPM to help physicians learn about the process of becoming certified and treating this insidious disease. ASAM is also collaborating with other organizations to promote awareness of this chronic brain disease, diminish stigma, and help those in need receive proper treatment.Together, we can close the treatment gap. Join us for Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week from April 24th to 30th and help treat addiction and save lives.Learn more by visiting www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org


News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM): By Email A week dedicated to recognizing the significant gap in treatment for those with the disease of addiction. Rockville, MD, April 22, 2017 --( The statistics which reflect the severity of the treatment gap are staggering. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment. “ASAM has been dedicated to helping physicians treat addiction and save lives since 1954. The first ever ABPM addiction medicine exam is the catalyst for moving addiction into mainstream medicine,” said Kelly Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, President of ASAM. “Certifying more addiction medicine physicians and educating the public can help close the treatment gap and ensure that patients receive the care they need.” Addiction medicine was recognized as an American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) subspecialty in 2016, and the first-ever addiction medicine certification exam from the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) will certify physicians in this subspecialty and offer them the unique ability to treat those with addiction. The ABPM addiction medicine exam will allow physicians to become board-certified in addiction medicine and will help close the treatment gap. ASAM is working diligently to promote this opportunity to as many physicians as possible. For a limited time period, ABMS board-certified physicians may qualify to take the exam by either meeting practice experience requirements or completing an addiction medicine fellowship. During Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week, ASAM is hosting an informational webinar on April 25th with experts from federal organizations and ABPM to help physicians learn about the process of becoming certified and treating this insidious disease. ASAM is also collaborating with other organizations to promote awareness of this chronic brain disease, diminish stigma, and help those in need receive proper treatment. Learn more by visiting www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org. Rockville, MD, April 22, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) will be hosting the first ever Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week April 24th to 30th, 2017. This national awareness week will be dedicated to recognizing the significant gap in treatment for those with the disease of addiction.The statistics which reflect the severity of the treatment gap are staggering. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.“ASAM has been dedicated to helping physicians treat addiction and save lives since 1954. The first ever ABPM addiction medicine exam is the catalyst for moving addiction into mainstream medicine,” said Kelly Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, President of ASAM. “Certifying more addiction medicine physicians and educating the public can help close the treatment gap and ensure that patients receive the care they need.”Addiction medicine was recognized as an American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) subspecialty in 2016, and the first-ever addiction medicine certification exam from the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) will certify physicians in this subspecialty and offer them the unique ability to treat those with addiction. The ABPM addiction medicine exam will allow physicians to become board-certified in addiction medicine and will help close the treatment gap. ASAM is working diligently to promote this opportunity to as many physicians as possible. For a limited time period, ABMS board-certified physicians may qualify to take the exam by either meeting practice experience requirements or completing an addiction medicine fellowship.During Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week, ASAM is hosting an informational webinar on April 25th with experts from federal organizations and ABPM to help physicians learn about the process of becoming certified and treating this insidious disease. ASAM is also collaborating with other organizations to promote awareness of this chronic brain disease, diminish stigma, and help those in need receive proper treatment.Learn more by visiting www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)


White S.R.,American Board of Emergency Medicine | Baker B.,American Board of Preventive Medicine | Baum C.R.,American Board of Pediatrics | Harvey A.,American Board of Emergency Medicine | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Medical Toxicology | Year: 2010

To date, there appear to be no studies investigating the practice settings of all Medical Toxicology (MT) diplomates. The MT Assessment of Practice Performance Taskforce queried all MT diplomates about their current practice settings relative to the number of patients seen, the most common diagnoses, and the percent of time spent in their roles as medical toxicologists (MTs) and in their primary specialty. One hundred twenty-seven surveys were completed (44% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents were affiliated with poison centers. Eighty-eight percent of participants were clinically active and reported seeing or consulting on behalf of at least ten patients over a 2-year period. Acetaminophen toxicity was the most common diagnosis encountered by respondents. Other common diagnoses included antidepressant toxicity, antipsychotic toxicity, mental status alteration, metal/environmental toxicity, envenomation, and pesticide toxicity. While respondents were likely to spend more time in direct patient care in their primary specialty, compared to consulting on behalf of patients, they were more likely to consult on behalf of patients in their role as MTs. Respondents spent more time in research, education, and population health in their role as an MT than in their primary specialty. Administrative activities were more commonly reported in association with the respondents' primary specialty than in their role as MTs. Most MTs encounter certain diagnoses with significant frequency and see a substantial number of patients within these categories. The majority spends more time on direct patient care in their primary specialty but is actively engaged in MT education, research, population health, and administration. A longitudinal assessment of MT practice patterns could inform MT curricular development and practice performance evaluation. © 2010 American College of Medical Toxicology.


White S.R.,American Board of Emergency Medicine | White S.R.,Detroit Receiving Hospital | Baker B.,American Board of Preventive Medicine | Baum C.R.,American Board of Pediatrics | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Medical Toxicology | Year: 2010

To date, there appear to be no studies that assess Medical Toxicologists' (MTs) practice improvement (PI) activities in their Medical Toxicology practice settings. The MT Assessment of Practice Performance (APP) Taskforce queried all MT diplomates about (1) activities currently available in their practice settings that potentially would meet the requirements of APP, (2) potential APP activities that best fit with current MT practice, and (3) the relationship between MT practice patterns and APP requirements. One hundred twenty-seven surveys were completed. Participation in MT practice improvement activities is not universal, with approximately a third of the survey participants reporting that they are not involved in any practice improvement activity. Few respondents reported that they collected performance improvement-related data. Most who did so participated in CME, case, or chart reviews. Peer reviews, self-improvement plans based on chart reviews, and population research were considered the most valid measures of MT practice improvement. Communication skills were considered important topics for patient surveys. Suggested outcomes for peer assessment included accuracy of information provided, understanding medical staff concerns, timeliness of feedback, and helpfulness. Most respondents rated all of the APP options as being somewhat very intrusive. Access to those with sufficient knowledge of the diplomate's practice improvement program to verify APP could pose a challenge to a successful completion of APP requirements. Optimal settings for the APP program administration are hospitals and poison centers. While barriers to MT APP activities exist, studying current MT diplomates' opinions and practices could inform the future development and administration of such programs. © 2010 American College of Medical Toxicology.


Gundlapalli A.V.,University of Utah | Gundlapalli A.V.,VA Salt Lake City Health Care System | Gundlapalli A.V.,Utah County Academy of science | Greaves W.W.,American Board of Preventive Medicine | And 4 more authors.
Studies in Health Technology and Informatics | Year: 2015

Clinical informatics workforce development is a high priority for medicine. Professional board certification for physicians is an important tool to demonstrating excellence. The recent recognition of clinical informatics as a subspecialty board in the U.S. has generated interest and excitement among the U.S. informatics community. To determine the extent of similar programs in countries around the world, we performed literature searches with relevant keywords and internet searches of websites of informatics societies around the world for mentions or descriptions of certifications and reviewed publicly available sources. The U.S. certification was prominent in the recent published literature. Germany and Belgium have long-standing certifications with South Korea and Sri Lanka considering similar programs. This is the first global view of clinical informatics board certification for physicians. Training and certification for non-physician informatics professionals in allied areas are widespread. Official recognition and certification for physicians and all informatics professionals represents a key component of capacity building and a means of addressing the shortage of a skilled informatics workforce. Wider adoption of certification programs may further attracting talent and accelerate growth of the field. © 2015 IMIA and IOS Press.


PubMed | Utah County Academy of science, University of New Mexico, International Medical Informatics Association, University of Utah and 3 more.
Type: | Journal: Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2015

Clinical informatics workforce development is a high priority for medicine. Professional board certification for physicians is an important tool to demonstrating excellence. The recent recognition of clinical informatics as a subspecialty board in the U.S. has generated interest and excitement among the U.S. informatics community. To determine the extent of similar programs in countries around the world, we performed literature searches with relevant keywords and internet searches of websites of informatics societies around the world for mentions or descriptions of certifications and reviewed publicly available sources. The U.S. certification was prominent in the recent published literature. Germany and Belgium have long-standing certifications with South Korea and Sri Lanka considering similar programs. This is the first global view of clinical informatics board certification for physicians. Training and certification for non-physician informatics professionals in allied areas are widespread. Official recognition and certification for physicians and all informatics professionals represents a key component of capacity building and a means of addressing the shortage of a skilled informatics workforce. Wider adoption of certification programs may further attracting talent and accelerate growth of the field.

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