American Board of Preventive Medicine

Chicago, IL, United States

American Board of Preventive Medicine

Chicago, IL, United States
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News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) will be hosting the first ever Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week, April 24-30th, 2017. -- (Rockville, MD) April 19, 2017 – The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) will be hosting the first ever Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week April 24th to 30th, 2017. This national awareness week will be dedicated to recognizing the significant gap in treatment for those with the disease of addiction.The statistics which reflect the severity of the treatment gap are staggering. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment."ASAM has been dedicated to helping physicians treat addiction and save lives since 1954. The first ever ABPM addiction medicine exam is the catalyst for moving addiction into mainstream medicine," said Kelly Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, President of ASAM. "Certifying more addiction medicine physicians and educating the public can help close the treatment gap and ensure that patients receive the care they need."Addiction medicine was recognized as an American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) subspecialty in 2016, and the first-ever addiction medicine certification exam from the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) will certify physicians in this subspecialty and offer them the unique ability to treat those with addiction. The ABPM addiction medicine exam will allow physicians to become board-certified in addiction medicine and will help close the treatment gap. ASAM is working diligently to promote this opportunity to as many physicians as possible. For a limited time period, ABMS board-certified physicians may qualify to take the exam by either meeting practice experience requirements or completing an addiction medicine fellowship.During Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week, ASAM is hosting an informational webinar on April 25th with experts from federal organizations and ABPM to help physicians learn about the process of becoming certified and treating this insidious disease. ASAM is also collaborating with other organizations to promote awareness of this chronic brain disease, diminish stigma, and help those in need receive proper treatment.Together, we can close the treatment gap. Join us for Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week from April 24th to 30th and help treat addiction and save lives.Learn more by visiting www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org


News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM): By Email A week dedicated to recognizing the significant gap in treatment for those with the disease of addiction. Rockville, MD, April 22, 2017 --( The statistics which reflect the severity of the treatment gap are staggering. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment. “ASAM has been dedicated to helping physicians treat addiction and save lives since 1954. The first ever ABPM addiction medicine exam is the catalyst for moving addiction into mainstream medicine,” said Kelly Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, President of ASAM. “Certifying more addiction medicine physicians and educating the public can help close the treatment gap and ensure that patients receive the care they need.” Addiction medicine was recognized as an American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) subspecialty in 2016, and the first-ever addiction medicine certification exam from the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) will certify physicians in this subspecialty and offer them the unique ability to treat those with addiction. The ABPM addiction medicine exam will allow physicians to become board-certified in addiction medicine and will help close the treatment gap. ASAM is working diligently to promote this opportunity to as many physicians as possible. For a limited time period, ABMS board-certified physicians may qualify to take the exam by either meeting practice experience requirements or completing an addiction medicine fellowship. During Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week, ASAM is hosting an informational webinar on April 25th with experts from federal organizations and ABPM to help physicians learn about the process of becoming certified and treating this insidious disease. ASAM is also collaborating with other organizations to promote awareness of this chronic brain disease, diminish stigma, and help those in need receive proper treatment. Learn more by visiting www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org. Rockville, MD, April 22, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) will be hosting the first ever Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week April 24th to 30th, 2017. This national awareness week will be dedicated to recognizing the significant gap in treatment for those with the disease of addiction.The statistics which reflect the severity of the treatment gap are staggering. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.“ASAM has been dedicated to helping physicians treat addiction and save lives since 1954. The first ever ABPM addiction medicine exam is the catalyst for moving addiction into mainstream medicine,” said Kelly Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, President of ASAM. “Certifying more addiction medicine physicians and educating the public can help close the treatment gap and ensure that patients receive the care they need.”Addiction medicine was recognized as an American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) subspecialty in 2016, and the first-ever addiction medicine certification exam from the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) will certify physicians in this subspecialty and offer them the unique ability to treat those with addiction. The ABPM addiction medicine exam will allow physicians to become board-certified in addiction medicine and will help close the treatment gap. ASAM is working diligently to promote this opportunity to as many physicians as possible. For a limited time period, ABMS board-certified physicians may qualify to take the exam by either meeting practice experience requirements or completing an addiction medicine fellowship.During Addiction Treatment Gap Awareness Week, ASAM is hosting an informational webinar on April 25th with experts from federal organizations and ABPM to help physicians learn about the process of becoming certified and treating this insidious disease. ASAM is also collaborating with other organizations to promote awareness of this chronic brain disease, diminish stigma, and help those in need receive proper treatment.Learn more by visiting www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Santa Fe’s only destination spa, Sunrise Springs Spa Resort, announced today that it will now offer day visitors and locals access to their wellness practitioners, Medical Director, Sally Fisher, MD, and Lead Counselor Michael Schroeder, LMFT. Dr. Fisher focuses on integrative, holistic, preventive and nutritional medicine while Schroeder focuses on individual and couples’ counseling. Both experts offer on-site, one-on-one sessions to help guests discover optimal health. Guests meet for a personal, confidential consultation with Dr. Fisher to discuss a holistic approach to health concerns or wellness goals. In this session, Dr. Fisher’s compassionate approach to creating a sustainable plan for living well can include a range of concerns including brain health, digestive health, weight, nutrition and supplements, sleep, stress and cortisol issues, female or male health, autoimmunity and cancer. For lodging guests, Dr. Fisher teaches a variety of classes at Sunrise, covering topics such as nutrition, stress and relaxation, gut health, ancient rhythms (sleep, seasons, sunlight and darkness), and how history, evolution and botany have all played important roles in our use of food as medicine. A 70-acre oasis centered around natural cold spring-fed ponds and surrounded by towering cottonwood trees and extensive gardens, Sunrise sets the stage for guests to quickly grasp an improved sense of well-being just by spending time outdoors, walking the property, bathed in sunshine and away from their digital devices. “When guests arrive, they say they feel better almost instantly,” said Fisher. “When people realize they have the capacity to shift their experience more easily than they expected, they become inspired in our sessions to reach the health goals and objectives they seek.” At the center of Sunrise Springs is a Medicine Wheel, which represents the harmonious balance between the mental, emotional, spiritual and physical aspects of well-being. Here Michael Schroeder begins a session with questions which lead to insights about a guest’s present life. By creating this awareness, guests better understand their relationship with themselves and their connection with others. Schroeder’s confidential one-on-one sessions are solution-focused, combining art, myth, mindfulness and elements of Zen Buddhism to address topics such as stress and anxiety, esteem, intimacy, relationship wellness and parenting. “Our healing philosophies and experiential offerings are built for anyone seeking a deeper exploration and understanding of their lives,” said Schroeder. Dr. Sally Fisher and Michael Schroeder lead an experienced team of wellness professionals with offerings such as expressive arts and cooking classes, mindfulness meditation, yoga and fitness and horticulture as well as therapeutic activities with Silkie chickens and Labrador puppies in training to be service dogs. Additionally, locals and day visitors can access a menu of services available at the Sunrise Springs Spa including massage, body work, skin care, and private pools in the Ojitos outdoor soaking experience. Guests are also welcome to dine on farm-fresh cuisine seven days a week for lunch, dinner and Sunday Brunch at the Blue Heron Restaurant, helmed by Executive Chef Rocky Durham. For more information on Sunrise Springs Spa Resort, visit sunrisesprings.com. ### ABOUT SALLY FISHER, MD: Dr. Fisher began her professional career by interning at the North Shore University Hospital/New York University School of Medicine. Subsequently, she completed her residency at Mt. Sinai/New York University School of Medicine in Preventative, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. She also participated in a fellowship program in holistic Medicine at Columbia University School of Medicine. More recently, Dr. Fisher worked as an integrative medicine/preventive medicine clinic physician at the University of New Mexico Center for Life. Dr. Fisher also has a private practice in Albuquerque offering integrative, preventive and nutritional medicine. Dr. Fisher received her B.A. in Psychology from Yale University summa cum laude. She then earned her M.D. at the University of New Mexico, where she received the Faculty Award for Outstanding Senior. Dr. Fisher earned her M.S. in Community Medicine at Mt. Sinai/New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Fisher is board certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine, the American Board of Integrative and Holistic Medicine and the American Board of Physician Nutrition Specialists. Dr. Fisher is also a clinical assistant professor at the University of New Mexico. ABOUT MICHAEL SCHROEDER, LMFT: Schroeder received undergraduate degrees in Psychology and Printmaking from the University of California Santa Cruz and has strived to maintain the connection between art and psychology in his career and personal life. Michael studied graphic and furniture design at Parsons School of Design in NYC and trained as a yoga instructor at New York’s Integral Yoga. For many years, Michael worked as a fine artist specializing in printmaking, resin casting and woodwork with gallery representation in New York City and Santa Fe. Art led him back to psychology, particularly depth-related modalities and the work of Carl Jung, MD. Schroeder received his Master’s Degree from Pacifica Graduate Institute, graduating summa cum laude. He has worked extensively with couples and kids. His psychotherapy practice is solution-focused, combining art, myth, mindfulness and elements of Zen Buddhism to help individuals and couples evolve to greater self-knowledge. Schroeder is a licensed psychotherapist (LMFT) in California and New Mexico. About Sunrise Springs Spa Resort The only destination spa in enchanting Santa Fe, N.M., Sunrise Springs Spa Resort, is a tranquil natural springs sanctuary that has been a source of rejuvenation for centuries, weaving ancient wisdom and healing traditions with modern wellness. At the heart of the resort’s 70 acres is a sacred Medicine Wheel surrounded by 20 spacious casitas and 32 garden-view guest rooms; the new Ojitos, open-air soaking experience; a spa; greenhouse; yoga, fitness and expressive arts studios; puppy studio and chicken coop; and restaurant serving nourishing farm-fresh cuisine. A passionate team of credentialed wellness professionals guide guests to discover their unique path to creating harmony amongst the four aspects of wellbeing: mental, emotional, physical and spiritual. All-inclusive offerings range from the one-night Refresh + Recharge package to multi-day Girls’ Getaways, Couples’ R+R, Wellness Exploration and Immerse + Thrive experiences. Guests can also visit the nearby historic sister property, Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort & Spa just north of Santa Fe. Sunrise Springs is an Ojo Spa Resort.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health has selected Wendy Elizabeth Braund, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.Ed., F.A.C.P.M., as the new director of its Center for Public Health Practice and associate dean for public health practice. She will join the school’s faculty as a professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management. Braund, who has a strong history in public health administration, most recently served as state health officer and public health division administrator for the Wyoming Department of Health. She will join Pitt Public Health on July 1. “Dr. Braund is a leader in public health practice and preventive medicine on a national stage, and we are proud to have her guide our efforts to move public health research and policy into practical application,” said Donald S. Burke, M.D., Pitt Public Health dean and UPMC-Jonas Salk chair of global health. “She is a dynamic and innovative practitioner with extensive experience in public service and policy. I am confident she will craft and lead a strategic vision for the center’s future and continue to build on regional collaborations to improve population health.” Pitt Public Health’s Center for Public Health Practice was established in 1995 with a mission of linking academia with professional public health practice to contribute to better health for all Pennsylvanians. The center has a strong focus on education and runs or provides support for programs that train public health practitioners in the latest best practices for their professional fields. It also places dozens of master’s and doctoral students in internships with public health agencies annually. “The Center for Public Health Practice at Pitt Public Health is an invaluable resource for state and local health regulators, public health organizations, emergency responders and other public health practitioners,” said Braund. “I’m excited to lead the center in new and innovative ways to bring research and practice together for the betterment of public health, while continuing the fantastic work its faculty, staff and partners perform every day.” Prior to the Wyoming Department of Health, Braund was with the U.S. Health Resources & Services Administration and served as chief of the Public Health Branch and acting chief of the Geriatrics and Allied Health Branch. Braund earned her M.D. from the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and completed a residency in preventive medicine at Johns Hopkins University. She earned her M.P.H. at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and also earned degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University. She completed the executive education program for state health leaders at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She serves on the Board of Regents of the American College of Preventive Medicine, as a trustee of the American Board of Preventive Medicine, and as a representative to the American Medical Association Section Council on Preventive Medicine, among other appointments. Since 2013 she has been a site reviewer on the Council on Education for Public Health. Gerald Barron, M.P.H., has served as acting director of the Pitt Public Health Center for Public Health Practice for the past two years. He will continue as deputy director of the center, director of the M.P.H. program in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Health Policy and Management, and associate professor of health policy and management, and behavioral and community health sciences. “Under Gerry’s stewardship, the center built and maintained strong relationships with state governments in our region, developed its faculty and enhanced its training programs,” said Burke. “We all thank him for his service.”


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Aboaba A. Afilaka Jr., MD, MS, MBBS, Occupational Medicine Physician to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Afilaka is a highly trained and qualified occupational medicine physician with an extensive expertise in preventive medicine. Holding over three decades of experience in his field, Dr. Afilaka is currently serving patients within Kaiser Permanente, The Permanente Medical Group, and the Stockton Medical Offices – Occupational Health Center in Stockton, California. A highly active physician, he conducts research on various topics such as musculoskeletal disorders, smoking cessation, toxicity, and asbestos related diseases. Dr. Afilaka’s career in medicine began after gaining his Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery Degree from the University of Nigeria, College of Medicine. Upon relocating to the United States, he completed an internship at Monmouth Medical Center in New Jersey. He then served his Occupational Medicine residency at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, before undertaking his Internal Medicine residency at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center in Bronx, New York. To keep up to date with the latest advances in his field, Dr. Afilaka remains a distinguished member of the American Medical Association and the New York Occupational Medicine Academy. He obtained board certification in Occupational Medicine by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. For his hard work and dedication to his speciality, Dr. Afilaka is a published author and the recipient of the Center for Multicultural and Community Affairs Award for Research. He credits his success to compassion, which allowed him to deliver the best possible patient care throughout his entire career. Dr. Afilaka has said about his work, “I believe that medical and surgical specialties seek curative outcomes; being an Occupational Medicine physician allows me to care for and educate members about injury prevention and to promote awareness of their work environment so they can work safely and effectively for themselves, co-workers, and the employer.” In his free time, Dr. Afilaka enjoys reading, as well as spending time outdoors biking, and hiking. Learn more about Dr. Afilaka here: https://mydoctor.kaiserpermanente.org/ncal/provider/aboabaafilaka#tab and be sure to read his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


White S.R.,American Board of Emergency Medicine | Baker B.,American Board of Preventive Medicine | Baum C.R.,American Board of Pediatrics | Harvey A.,American Board of Emergency Medicine | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Medical Toxicology | Year: 2010

To date, there appear to be no studies investigating the practice settings of all Medical Toxicology (MT) diplomates. The MT Assessment of Practice Performance Taskforce queried all MT diplomates about their current practice settings relative to the number of patients seen, the most common diagnoses, and the percent of time spent in their roles as medical toxicologists (MTs) and in their primary specialty. One hundred twenty-seven surveys were completed (44% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents were affiliated with poison centers. Eighty-eight percent of participants were clinically active and reported seeing or consulting on behalf of at least ten patients over a 2-year period. Acetaminophen toxicity was the most common diagnosis encountered by respondents. Other common diagnoses included antidepressant toxicity, antipsychotic toxicity, mental status alteration, metal/environmental toxicity, envenomation, and pesticide toxicity. While respondents were likely to spend more time in direct patient care in their primary specialty, compared to consulting on behalf of patients, they were more likely to consult on behalf of patients in their role as MTs. Respondents spent more time in research, education, and population health in their role as an MT than in their primary specialty. Administrative activities were more commonly reported in association with the respondents' primary specialty than in their role as MTs. Most MTs encounter certain diagnoses with significant frequency and see a substantial number of patients within these categories. The majority spends more time on direct patient care in their primary specialty but is actively engaged in MT education, research, population health, and administration. A longitudinal assessment of MT practice patterns could inform MT curricular development and practice performance evaluation. © 2010 American College of Medical Toxicology.


White S.R.,American Board of Emergency Medicine | White S.R.,Detroit Receiving Hospital | Baker B.,American Board of Preventive Medicine | Baum C.R.,American Board of Pediatrics | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Medical Toxicology | Year: 2010

To date, there appear to be no studies that assess Medical Toxicologists' (MTs) practice improvement (PI) activities in their Medical Toxicology practice settings. The MT Assessment of Practice Performance (APP) Taskforce queried all MT diplomates about (1) activities currently available in their practice settings that potentially would meet the requirements of APP, (2) potential APP activities that best fit with current MT practice, and (3) the relationship between MT practice patterns and APP requirements. One hundred twenty-seven surveys were completed. Participation in MT practice improvement activities is not universal, with approximately a third of the survey participants reporting that they are not involved in any practice improvement activity. Few respondents reported that they collected performance improvement-related data. Most who did so participated in CME, case, or chart reviews. Peer reviews, self-improvement plans based on chart reviews, and population research were considered the most valid measures of MT practice improvement. Communication skills were considered important topics for patient surveys. Suggested outcomes for peer assessment included accuracy of information provided, understanding medical staff concerns, timeliness of feedback, and helpfulness. Most respondents rated all of the APP options as being somewhat very intrusive. Access to those with sufficient knowledge of the diplomate's practice improvement program to verify APP could pose a challenge to a successful completion of APP requirements. Optimal settings for the APP program administration are hospitals and poison centers. While barriers to MT APP activities exist, studying current MT diplomates' opinions and practices could inform the future development and administration of such programs. © 2010 American College of Medical Toxicology.


Gundlapalli A.V.,University of Utah | Gundlapalli A.V.,VA Salt Lake City Health Care System | Gundlapalli A.V.,Utah County Academy of science | Greaves W.W.,American Board of Preventive Medicine | And 4 more authors.
Studies in Health Technology and Informatics | Year: 2015

Clinical informatics workforce development is a high priority for medicine. Professional board certification for physicians is an important tool to demonstrating excellence. The recent recognition of clinical informatics as a subspecialty board in the U.S. has generated interest and excitement among the U.S. informatics community. To determine the extent of similar programs in countries around the world, we performed literature searches with relevant keywords and internet searches of websites of informatics societies around the world for mentions or descriptions of certifications and reviewed publicly available sources. The U.S. certification was prominent in the recent published literature. Germany and Belgium have long-standing certifications with South Korea and Sri Lanka considering similar programs. This is the first global view of clinical informatics board certification for physicians. Training and certification for non-physician informatics professionals in allied areas are widespread. Official recognition and certification for physicians and all informatics professionals represents a key component of capacity building and a means of addressing the shortage of a skilled informatics workforce. Wider adoption of certification programs may further attracting talent and accelerate growth of the field. © 2015 IMIA and IOS Press.


PubMed | Utah County Academy of science, University of New Mexico, International Medical Informatics Association, University of Utah and 3 more.
Type: | Journal: Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2015

Clinical informatics workforce development is a high priority for medicine. Professional board certification for physicians is an important tool to demonstrating excellence. The recent recognition of clinical informatics as a subspecialty board in the U.S. has generated interest and excitement among the U.S. informatics community. To determine the extent of similar programs in countries around the world, we performed literature searches with relevant keywords and internet searches of websites of informatics societies around the world for mentions or descriptions of certifications and reviewed publicly available sources. The U.S. certification was prominent in the recent published literature. Germany and Belgium have long-standing certifications with South Korea and Sri Lanka considering similar programs. This is the first global view of clinical informatics board certification for physicians. Training and certification for non-physician informatics professionals in allied areas are widespread. Official recognition and certification for physicians and all informatics professionals represents a key component of capacity building and a means of addressing the shortage of a skilled informatics workforce. Wider adoption of certification programs may further attracting talent and accelerate growth of the field.

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