American Association for the Advancement of Science

Washington, DC, United States

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Washington, DC, United States
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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Rice University chemist Gustavo Scuseria won the 2017 Royal Society of Chemistry S F Boys - A Rahman Award. This biennial award from the London-based international organization for chemical scientists recognizes outstanding innovative research in the area of computational chemistry, including both quantum chemistry and molecular simulations. Scuseria will complete a lecture tour in the U.K. to share his research. "I am deeply honored to receive this award, whose previous winners are founding figures in electronic structure theory and quantum chemistry," said Scuseria, the Robert A. Welch Professor of Chemistry. "I look forward to sharing exciting new results about our quest for solving the strong correlation problem during my U.K. university tour." Scuseria, who is also a professor of physics and astronomy and of materials science and nanoengineering, focuses on work that straddles the interface of quantum chemistry, condensed matter physics and materials science and, ultimately, the development of important materials for energy and the environment. Scuseria's list of honors includes the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, a Creativity Extension Award from the National Science Foundation, an IBM Partnership Award, the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology Theory, a Humboldt Research Award, a Lisa Meitner Minerva Lectureship from Israel and a Distinguished Israel Pollak Lecturer from the Technion. Born and raised in San Fernando, Buenos Aires, Scuseria has been a Rice faculty member since 1989. He is co-editor of the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation and serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany, and the Scientific Advisory Board on the Many Electrons Initiative of the Simons Foundation in New York. He is vice president of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science and a fellow of the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Guggenheim Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. The Royal Society of Chemistry, which has more than 54,000 members and a heritage that spans 175 years, advances excellence in the chemical sciences. It recognizes achievements by individuals, teams and organizations in advancing the chemical discipline. Fifty previous winners of Royal Society of Chemistry awards have gone on to win Nobel Prizes for their work. This release can be found online at news.rice.edu. Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation's top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice's undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. To read "What they're saying about Rice," go to http://tinyurl. .


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

FUKUOKA, Japan, May 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Edanz is proud to announce a new collaboration with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to provide language editing services. "We are always looking for new tools and services to help the research community and we see the Edanz language editing service doing just that. We hope that Edanz will provide AAAS authors with access to a reliable language editing option, ensuring that author documents are clean and grammatically correct," said Hannah Heckner, Product Development Associate with AAAS.


News Article | May 14, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The Tosney Award for Career Service in Higher Education honors the outstanding, long-term contributions of administrators in the field of higher education. Dr. Calvin began his service at PAU in 1984 as PAU's second President.  Highlights of his tenure include the formation of partnership with the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford University to create the Psy.D. Consortium, the development of multiple masters and undergraduate programs, the re-naming of the university from Pacific Graduate School of Psychology to Palo Alto University in 2009 and the establishment of the current, main campus of the university in Palo Alto, CA. Prior to joining Palo Alto University, Dr. Calvin served on the faculties of Michigan State University, Hollins College, and the University of San Francisco. He was also a consulting professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. Allen graduated cum laude from the University of Minnesota and received a Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of Texas. Beyond his teaching and leadership, Dr. Calvin has written numerous papers, authored/edited six books and was a contributing editor to Educational Technology. He is currently a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, American Psychological Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. "Allen wasn't a leader focused only on business," said Mr. Tom Yeh, PAU Board of Trustees Member and nominator of Dr. Calvin for this award. "He was compassionate to the needs of people. The students, faculty, and staff around him mattered most." ABOUT PALO ALTO UNIVERSITY Palo Alto University (PAU) was founded in 1975 and is dedicated to education with an emphasis in the behavioral and social sciences.  Offering bachelor, master and doctorate degrees, PAU's mission is to improve lives, with an emphasis on diverse cultures and serving the community. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/palo-alto-university-president-emeritus-to-receive-2017-tosney-award-300457116.html


HOUSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aravive Biologics today announced the appointment of Stephen L. Eck, M.D., Ph.D. as President and Chief Executive Officer. Dr. Eck was formerly Vice President of Oncology Medical Sciences at Astellas Pharma Global Development, Inc. Ray Tabibiazar, M.D., founding President and CEO of Aravive, remains as Chairman of the company’s Board of Directors. “Stephen has an impressive track-record of oncology drug and biomarker development at prominent pharmaceutical companies, as well as a close relationship to Houston’s M.D. Anderson Cancer Center as a member of the Advisory Board for their oncology Moonshot Program,” said Dr. Tabibiazar. “We welcome his expertise and leadership to the Aravive team as we prepare to advance our lead drug candidate, Aravive-S6, into human clinical testing in 2018.” “I am very excited to be joining Aravive at this point in the company’s development,” said Dr. Eck. “Aravive-S6 is a novel and promising agent that has shown in preclinical trials the potential to improve the treatment of cancer in combination with a wide range of other approaches, including chemotherapeutic drugs, radiation, PARP inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors. I look forward to helping Aravive realize the full potential that I believe Gas6/AXL inhibition can bring to the treatment of cancer.” Prior to joining Astellas Pharma, Stephen Eck served as Vice President, Translational Medicine & Pharmacogenomics at Eli Lilly and Company, where his group developed the biomarkers and companion diagnostics needed for study-specific decision making and for tailoring biotherapeutics to unique patient populations. Prior to joining Lilly, he served in a variety of oncology and neuroscience drug development leadership roles at Pfizer, Inc. Dr. Eck is a board-certified hematologist, who holds a Ph.D. in chemistry from Harvard University and received his M.D. degree from the University of Mississippi School of Medicine. He serves on the Board of Directors of Luminex Corporation, a Texas-based life sciences company, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Personalized Medicine Coalition. Aravive Biologics is a privately held, late pre-clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing novel, highly selective cancer therapies that treat serious malignancies while sparing normal healthy cells. The company’s lead program is focused on the GAS6/AXL pathway, where activation appears to play a critical role in multiple types of cancer malignancies by promoting tumor metastasis and cell survival. Aravive Biologics has generated strong preclinical data for its lead drug candidate, Aravive-S6, in both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and solid tumors including ovarian, pancreatic, and breast cancers. The company is based in Houston, Texas, and receives support from the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT). For more information, please visit our website at http://www.aravive.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements contained in this press release include, without limitation, statements regarding the expected contribution of Dr. Eck, and Aravive-S6’s potential to improve the treatment of cancer in combination with a wide range of other approaches, including chemotherapeutic drugs, radiation, PARP inhibitors and checkpoint inhibitors. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve a number of unknown risks, assumptions, uncertainties and factors that are beyond Aravive Biologics' control including the ability to successfully integrate Dr. Eck into the Aravive management, and the ability of Aravive-S6 to treat cancer, the ability of Aravive-S6 to demonstrate safety and efficacy, as well as clinical results that are consistent with prior in vitro results, the ability to enroll patients and complete the clinical trials on time and achieve desired results and benefits, the company’s ability to obtain regulatory approvals for commercialization of product candidates or to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements, regulatory limitations relating to the company’s ability to promote or commercialize its product candidates for specific indications, acceptance of its product candidates in the marketplace and the successful development, marketing or sale of products, the company’s ability to maintain its license agreements, the continued maintenance and growth of its patent estate, its ability to establish and maintain collaborations, its ability to obtain or maintain the capital or grants necessary to fund its research and development activities, and its ability to retain its key scientists or management personnel. All forward-looking statements are based on Aravive Biologics' expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release. Actual results may differ materially from these forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, Aravive Biologics expressly disclaims any responsibility to update any forward-looking statement contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


Yaffe M.B.,American Association for the Advancement of Science | Yaffe M.B.,Cambridge Broad Institute
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

The massive resources devoted to genome sequencing of human tumors have produced important data sets for the cancer biology community. Paradoxically, however, these studies have revealed very little new biology. Despite this, additional resources in the United States are slated to continue such work and to expand similar efforts in genome sequencing to mouse tumors. It may be that scientists are "addicted" to the large amounts of data that can be relatively easily obtained, even though these data seem unlikely, on their own, to unveil new cancer treatment options or result in the ultimate goal of a cancer cure. Rather than using more tumor genetic sequences, a better strategy for identifying new treatment options may be to develop methods for analyzing the signaling networks that underlie cancer development, progression, and therapeutic resistance at both a personal and systems-wide level. © 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Wong W.,American Association for the Advancement of Science
Science Signaling | Year: 2011

Cells interpret environmental cues to extend processes in the appropriate direction, descend upon sources of inflammation or necrosis, or determine the best path to the correct position in a developing organism. This Focus Issue of Science Signaling highlights the signaling pathways and mechanisms that enable cells to sense external signals and direct their movement accordingly. © 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.


Wong W.,American Association for the Advancement of Science
Science Signaling | Year: 2012

The process by which cells orient their movement according to external gradients plays important roles in physiological and pathological processes. This Focus Issue of Science Signaling highlights the interplay between molecules, signaling pathways, and mechanisms that enable directional movement.


Wong W.,American Association for the Advancement of science
Science Signaling | Year: 2012

During the month of May, Science Signaling will publish research and commentary that use or describe the application of structural approaches to reveal the mechanisms underlying signaling molecules and events, to uncover how signaling molecules perform their biological functions or contribute to disease, and to highlight potentially fruitful avenues for drug design.


Ferrarelli L.K.,American Association for the Advancement of Science
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

Receptor tyrosine kinases and the signaling networks that they control contribute to cancer and resistance to therapies. Therefore, understanding these networks, how they vary within and among tumors and how they adapt to enable cancer cells to circumvent treatment, should lead to more effective therapeutic strategies in treating the diverse disease that is cancer. As Science Signaling highlights in this week's issue, systems biology and computational biology are shining light on these complex networks and enabling integration of diverse information about genetics, proteomics, and network activity to effectively predict therapeutic response and identify key components to target for intervention.


Ferrarelli L.K.,American Association for the Advancement of Science
Science Signaling | Year: 2014

Treating cancer involves not only stemming the growth of the primary tumor but also preventing its progression to metastatic disease. Advances in our understanding of the molecular pathways that transform healthy cells and maintain the proliferative advantage of tumor cells have enabled the development of targeted therapeutics, but preventing drug resistance and the switch to metastatic disease remains challenging. As this week's issue of Science Signaling highlights, dissection of the pathways that regulate infl ammation in the tumor microenvironment and insight into the molecular changes that occur in cells in response to therapy may improve clinical strategies, particularly for aggressive breast and skin cancers.

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