American Association for the Advancement of Science

Washington, DC, United States

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Washington, DC, United States

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News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

SOUTH BEND, IN, May 23, 2017-- Anthony Marion Trozzolo is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dr. Trozzolo a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Dr. Trozzolo celebrates many years' experience in his professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes he has accrued in his field.An esteemed and long-standing figure in his industry with over 60 years of career experience, Dr. Trozzolo currently serves as a Charles L. Huisking Professor Emeritus of Chemistry for the University of Notre Dame.In addition to his status as Lifetime Achiever, Dr. Trozzolo has previously received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Chicago as well as the Illinois Institute of Technology, the UNICO National Marconi Science Award, and the Pietro Bucci Prize from the Italian Chemical Society. Dr. Trozzolo has also been recognized as a Fellow of the National Science Foundation, the Atomic Energy Commission, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as an honorary citizen of Castrolibero and a Fellow of the American Chemical Society. Furthermore, Dr. Trozzolo has been a featured listee in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in American Education, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, Who's Who in the Midwest and Who's Who in the World.In recognition of outstanding contributions to his profession and the Marquis Who's Who community, Anthony Marion Trozzolo has been featured on the Marquis Who's Who Lifetime Achievers website. Please visit http://whoswholifetimeachievers.com/2017/03/13/anthony-marion-trozzolo/ to view this distinguished honor.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com Contact:Fred Marks844-394-6946


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

HOUSTON -- (May 15, 2017) -- Rice University plasmonics pioneer Naomi Halas has won a 2017 Weizmann Women and Science Award from the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel. The biennial award, which was established in 1994, honors internationally renowned women scientists who have made significant contributions, both in their respective fields and to the larger scientific community. The award is designed to promote women in science by providing strong role models to motivate and encourage the next generation of young women scientists. It includes a $25,000 research grant. Halas, a pioneer in the study of the fundamental properties and potential applications of light-activated nanoparticles, is Rice's Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and professor of chemistry, bioengineering, physics and astronomy, and materials science and nanoengineering. In announcing the honor, the institute recognized Halas "for pioneering and seminal contributions to the field of plasmonics, which have profoundly influenced modern optics -- both in basic understanding and in applications." Halas and fellow 2017 honoree Ursula Keller of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich will accept their honors and deliver a series of lectures June 7 at the Weizmann Institute. "Ursi Keller has been a friend of mine since our postdoctoral days at AT&T Bell Laboratories, and I am thrilled to win this award with her," Halas said. Halas pursues research in light-nanoparticle interactions and their applications in biomedicine, optoelectronics, chemical sensing, photocatalysis and sustainability. She has explored how light-activated nanomaterials can be used for applications ranging from the treatment of cancer and molecular sensing to biomimetic photodetection and off-grid solar-powered sterilization. Halas is the first person in the university's history to be elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering for research done at Rice. She has authored more than 300 refereed publications, and her work has been cited more than 45,000 times. She also is the founding director of Rice's Smalley-Curl Institute, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Materials Research Society, the Optical Society, the American Physical Society, the International Society for Optical Engineering and the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The Weizmann Institute of Science is a leading multidisciplinary basic research institution in the natural and exact sciences. Located near Tel Aviv, it was established in 1934 and renamed in 1949 in honor of its founder and Israel's first president, Chaim Weizmann. A high-resolution IMAGE is available for download at: Rice's 'antenna-reactor' catalysts offer best of both worlds -- July 18, 2016 http://news. Rice scientists use light to probe acoustic tuning in gold nanodisks -- May 7, 2015 http://news. Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation's top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice's undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. To read "What they're saying about Rice," go to http://tinyurl. .


Upon joining the board, Dr. Moniz added that, "as someone dedicated to innovation breakthroughs for a low-carbon energy future, I am pleased to join outstanding colleagues at Tri Alpha Energy who see the company's technology offering the real possibility of just such a game-changer." Moniz served as the Secretary of Energy from May 2013 to January 2017.  As Secretary, he advanced energy technology innovation, cutting-edge capabilities for the American scientific research community, and environmental stewardship.  He strengthened the Department of Energy's (DOE) strategic partnerships with its seventeen national laboratories and with the Department of Defense and the broader national security establishment.  Moniz's involvement in national energy policy began in 1995, when he served as Associate Director for Science in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President. He later oversaw the Department of Energy's science, energy and security programs as Under Secretary from 1997 to 2001.  He was also a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology from 2009 to 2013 and received the Department of Defense Distinguished Public Service Award in 2016. Before his appointment as Secretary in 2013, Moniz had a noteworthy career spanning four decades at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Moniz was Head of the MIT Department of Physics during 1991-1995 and 1997, and was the Founding Director of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI) and Director of the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment.  He was a leader of various multidisciplinary technology and policy studies on the future of energy in a low-carbon world.  Currently, he is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems emeritus, Special Advisor to the MIT President and has been announced as co-chairman and CEO of the Nuclear Threat Initiative.  Dr. Moniz is also a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Harvard Belfer Center and the inaugural Distinguished Fellow of the Emerson Collective. Moniz has served on numerous public and private boards, including the Department of Defense Threat Reduction Advisory Committee and the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future.  He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Humboldt Foundation, and the American Physical Society. Tri Alpha Energy is leveraging breakthrough science and engineering to solve the quintessential problem of our time: how to harness an unlimited and powerful source of clean, renewable energy. With pioneering work in advanced plasma physics, and an abundant and safe fuel source found in common beach sand, Tri Alpha Energy is recreating the same natural process that occurs in stars: the fusion of hydrogen atoms in a hot plasma gas, releasing tremendous amounts of energy. The company applies advanced particle accelerator and plasma physics in order to create a commercially competitive fusion electric generator that is compact, safe, carbon-free and sustainable, creates no environmental or health hazards, produces only helium, is not a controlled substance, and is non-radioactive. From its headquarters in California, Tri Alpha Energy is solving energy for the world.  For more information, please visit www.trialphaenergy.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/former-us-energy-secretary-ernest-moniz-joins-board-of-directors-for-fusion-energy-leader-tri-alpha-energy-300459608.html


LOS ANGELES - New research from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) shows new promise in the fight against one of the most lethal forms of cancer. Studies in mice with a mutation present in 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients (the KRAS mutation) indicate that expressing only half the amount of the glucose-regulated protein GRP78 is enough to halt the earliest stage of pancreatic cancer development. The study, funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, suggests that because the protein is required for "switching" healthy pancreatic cells that produce enzymes to digest food into potentially cancerous cells, reducing the amount of this protein delays pancreatic cancer development and prolongs survival. The study, published online on May 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to establish the pivotal role of the protein in pancreatic cancer. "Cancer cells are addicted to high levels of GRP78 for cancer development and growth. Our hope is that partially reducing or inactivating the protein by therapeutic agents could one day be an effective complementary therapy for pancreatic cancer and other cancers, while sparing other healthy organs," said Amy Lee, PhD, professor of biochemistry and molecular medicine at the Keck School and the Judy and Larry Freeman Chair in Basic Science Research at the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Lee, who was the first scientist to clone human GRP78, has since dedicated much of her research to investigating the protein's role in cancer progression and treatment. For her scientific contributions, Lee was honored by a MERIT award from the National Cancer Institute and elected as Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. "As developing drugs directly targeting the KRAS genetic mutation has been challenging, we are thrilled these findings indicate that we can attack KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer through an entirely new method," Lee said. GRP78 is a stress-inducible protein that folds newly synthesized proteins and performs quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum (an essential component of human cells). During stress, a fraction of GRP78 is shipped out to the cell surface to perform additional growth and survival functions. Cancer cells, particularly those that survive treatment, typically undergo more stress than healthy cells, resulting in increased levels of GRP78 to help the cancer cells survive, grow and develop therapeutic resistance. A number of studies across cancer types have shown a relationship between highly elevated levels of the protein and increased risk for cancer recurrence or decreased survival. With GRP78 emerging as an attractive anti-cancer target, there is active development of potential treatments that can inhibit GRP78 activity or expression, including some that are in early-phase clinical trials with promising results. Certain food and herbs, including green tea and soy, contain natural compounds that can suppress the protein, Lee said. Patients and physicians alike are eager for more effective treatments for pancreatic cancer, as it is among the deadliest forms of cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 53,600 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year, and more than 43,000 people will die from the disease. The five-year survival rate for early stage pancreatic cancer is only 12 percent, compared to 100 percent for breast cancer and prostate cancer and 92 percent for colon cancer. "Translating any basic science discovery into clinical practice is a long process that requires substantial resources," Lee said. "But given the notorious difficulties of treating KRAS-mutation related cancers, particularly in a disease as devastating as pancreatic cancer, this research provides hope and a novel approach. I am excited to put our theories to test in the clinical setting." Founded in 1885, the Keck School of Medicine of USC is among the nation's leaders in innovative patient care, scientific discovery, education, and community service. It is part of Keck Medicine of USC, the University of Southern California's medical enterprise, one of only two university-owned academic medical centers in the Los Angeles area. This includes the Keck Medical Center of USC, composed of the Keck Hospital of USC and the USC Norris Cancer Hospital. The two world-class, USC-owned hospitals are staffed by more than 500 physicians who are faculty at the Keck School. The school today has more than 1,500 full-time faculty members and voluntary faculty of more than 2,400 physicians. These faculty direct the education of approximately 700 medical students and 1,000 students pursuing graduate and post-graduate degrees. The school trains more than 900 resident physicians in more than 50 specialty or subspecialty programs and is the largest educator of physicians practicing in Southern California. Together, the school's faculty and residents serve more than 1.5 million patients each year at Keck Hospital of USC and USC Norris Cancer Hospital, as well as USC-affiliated hospitals Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center. Keck School faculty also conduct research and teach at several research centers and institutes, including the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, the Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine at USC, the USC Cardiovascular Thoracic Institute, the USC Roski Eye Institute and the USC Institute of Urology. In 2017, U.S. News & World Report ranked Keck School of Medicine among the Top 40 medical schools in the country. For more information, go to keck.usc.edu. This press release references support by the National Institutes of Health under award numbers R21 CA179273 ($393,911 over two years), R01 CA027607 ($1,748,391 over five years) and R01 CA133117 ($1,968,744 over five years). Research was conducted at facilities supported by awards P30 CA014089 ($30,711,039 over five years) and P30 DK048522 ($5,934,825 over five years). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The research above was also supported by the Julia Stearns Dockweiler Foundation in the amount of $85,000.


Yaffe M.B.,American Association for the Advancement of Science | Yaffe M.B.,Cambridge Broad Institute
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

The massive resources devoted to genome sequencing of human tumors have produced important data sets for the cancer biology community. Paradoxically, however, these studies have revealed very little new biology. Despite this, additional resources in the United States are slated to continue such work and to expand similar efforts in genome sequencing to mouse tumors. It may be that scientists are "addicted" to the large amounts of data that can be relatively easily obtained, even though these data seem unlikely, on their own, to unveil new cancer treatment options or result in the ultimate goal of a cancer cure. Rather than using more tumor genetic sequences, a better strategy for identifying new treatment options may be to develop methods for analyzing the signaling networks that underlie cancer development, progression, and therapeutic resistance at both a personal and systems-wide level. © 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Wong W.,American Association for the Advancement of Science
Science Signaling | Year: 2011

Cells interpret environmental cues to extend processes in the appropriate direction, descend upon sources of inflammation or necrosis, or determine the best path to the correct position in a developing organism. This Focus Issue of Science Signaling highlights the signaling pathways and mechanisms that enable cells to sense external signals and direct their movement accordingly. © 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.


Wong W.,American Association for the Advancement of Science
Science Signaling | Year: 2012

The process by which cells orient their movement according to external gradients plays important roles in physiological and pathological processes. This Focus Issue of Science Signaling highlights the interplay between molecules, signaling pathways, and mechanisms that enable directional movement.


Wong W.,American Association for the Advancement of science
Science Signaling | Year: 2012

During the month of May, Science Signaling will publish research and commentary that use or describe the application of structural approaches to reveal the mechanisms underlying signaling molecules and events, to uncover how signaling molecules perform their biological functions or contribute to disease, and to highlight potentially fruitful avenues for drug design.


Ferrarelli L.K.,American Association for the Advancement of Science
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

Receptor tyrosine kinases and the signaling networks that they control contribute to cancer and resistance to therapies. Therefore, understanding these networks, how they vary within and among tumors and how they adapt to enable cancer cells to circumvent treatment, should lead to more effective therapeutic strategies in treating the diverse disease that is cancer. As Science Signaling highlights in this week's issue, systems biology and computational biology are shining light on these complex networks and enabling integration of diverse information about genetics, proteomics, and network activity to effectively predict therapeutic response and identify key components to target for intervention.


Ferrarelli L.K.,American Association for the Advancement of Science
Science Signaling | Year: 2014

Treating cancer involves not only stemming the growth of the primary tumor but also preventing its progression to metastatic disease. Advances in our understanding of the molecular pathways that transform healthy cells and maintain the proliferative advantage of tumor cells have enabled the development of targeted therapeutics, but preventing drug resistance and the switch to metastatic disease remains challenging. As this week's issue of Science Signaling highlights, dissection of the pathways that regulate infl ammation in the tumor microenvironment and insight into the molecular changes that occur in cells in response to therapy may improve clinical strategies, particularly for aggressive breast and skin cancers.

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