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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Continuing Education Company(CEC), a leader in Primary Care Live Continuing Medical Education (CME), is celebrating 25 years of presenting quality education to Primary Care clinicians. In honor of their 25th anniversary, CEC will be offering a free 20 credit online CME course to all attendees of their 2017 live conferences. The complimentary course will be available through CEC's online portal, CME365, and will enable CEC conference attendees to earn a total of up to 40 credits. This offer is valid only for participants who attend all the days of the live conference they select. Access to the online CME course is sent to registrants after they have attended and successfully completed the live conference. The online CME course is not transferable and is not valid if they cancel their registration or are a no show at the live conference. Webcast participants are not eligible for this offer. Walter Ejnes, President of CEC says "Continuing Education Company's free 20 credit online CME course offering is our way of saying thank you to the thousands of medical professionals who have supported us for the past 25 years." CME365 offers live streaming webcasts of CEC's conferences as well as online courses in Primary Care, Urgent Care and Pulmonology. All the online courses are fully accredited and feature the same high quality education as the live Continuing Medical Education conferences that Continuing Education Company offers throughout the year. Continuing Education Company, Inc. (CEC) is an independent, non-profit, 501 (c)(3) continuing medical education organization. They have been developing and presenting continuing medical education programs for over 25 years. Their mission is to develop and provide educational opportunities to improve the skills and knowledge of medical and healthcare professionals. They accomplish this mission by offering American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and ABIM MOC accredited live CME conferences and online courses. The mission of Continuing Education Company, Inc. (CEC) is to improve public health by developing and providing educational opportunities to advance the skills and knowledge of physicians and other healthcare professionals. This mission is accomplished by assisting healthcare professionals in assessing their educational needs and providing them with evidence-based education which meet those needs. For more information please visit the company website, http://www.cmemeeting.org. __title__ online link]


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

FREDERIKSTED, VI, May 19, 2017-- Cora L.E Christian is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dr. Christian a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Dr. Christian celebrates many years' experience in her professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes she has accrued in her field.A respected and hard-working figure in her industry, Dr. Christian currently operates her own private, family-based practice as a physician, which she has maintained for over 40 years.Dr. Christian has served as president of her local chapter of American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) for more than 30 years, and she has also served as a fellow of the AAFP for more than 40 years, and as a sergeant-at-arms at its Congress of Delegates for the past eight years. She is a proud member of the national board of AARP, having served in that role for six years. Above all, however, she is proud to manage a family practice that has served four generations of families in an area with limited access to health care.In addition to her status as a Lifetime Achiever, Dr. Christian has previously received the Fellowship Award, Commendation and a Special Notation from the American Board of Quality Assurance, as well as recognition as one of the Trail Blazers for Women's History by Women's Business Center. A Paul Harris Fellow courtesy of Rotary International, Dr. Christian has also been a featured listee in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, Who's Who in the South and Southwest, Who's Who in the World, and Who's Who of American Women.In recognition of outstanding contributions to her profession and the Marquis Who's Who community, Cora L.E Christian has been featured on the Marquis Who's Who Lifetime Achievers website. Please visit http://wwlifetimeachievement.com/2017/05/02/cora-l-e-christian/ to view this distinguished honor.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com Contact:Fred Marks844-394-6946


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Continuing Education Company, Inc (CEC), a leader in Primary Care Live Continuing Medical Education (CME), has scheduled their 6th Annual Essentials in Primary Care CME Winter Conference from February 5-9, 2018 and moved the location from Marco Island to the Naples Grande Beach Resort in Naples, Florida. For 25 years, Continuing Education Company has been presenting quality live CME conferences. As a result of this conference, participants will be able to assess and provide patients with an accurate diagnosis and optimal care for a broad range of disorders seen in primary care, utilize current guidelines in the diagnosis and management of commonly encountered therapeutic issues and formulate comprehensive evidence-based interventions and treatment strategies that will lead to the reduction of modifiable risk factors and improved long term outcomes. The 6th Annual Essentials in Primary Care Winter Conference runs every morning from 8am-12:15pm and then attendees are free to relax and reflect during the afternoon and evenings. Naples Grande Beach Resort is known as Southwest Florida’s premiere destination for couples, families and business groups looking for an eco-smart beach retreat with panoramic views of the Gulf of Mexico. The resort sits on 23 waterfront acres complete with three miles of sugar sand beach amidst 200 acres of a nature preserve and mangrove estuary that recalls Old World Florida. The resort’s 424 luxuriously chic and fully renovated guestrooms, including 29 suites, all boast breathtaking Gulf of Mexico views from private balconies. Su Barnwell, Director of Program Management for CEC, says, "A Primary Care CME Conference at the Naples Grande Beach Resort is the perfect setting. Attendees will receive quality medical education in the morning and then have the rest of the day to enjoy the beautiful resort and area" The 6th Annual Essentials in Primary Care Winter Conference will also be offered as a live streaming webcast. This is for the convenience of our attendees who are unable to travel to Naples. This live webcast enables them to watch the conference from anywhere as long as they have an internet connection. They will receive the same number of credits as if they attended the conference in person. The conference takes place in the eastern time zone and all agenda times reflect that. Participants must watch the webcast live to receive credit for the conference. Continuing Education Company, Inc. (CEC) is an independent, non-profit, 501 (c)(3) continuing medical education organization. They have been developing and presenting continuing medical education programs for over 25 years. Their mission is to develop and provide educational opportunities to improve the skills and knowledge of medical and healthcare professionals. They accomplish this mission by offering American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and ABIM MOC accredited live CME conferences and online courses. The mission of Continuing Education Company, Inc. (CEC) is to improve public health by developing and providing educational opportunities to advance the skills and knowledge of physicians and other healthcare professionals. This mission is accomplished by assisting healthcare professionals in assessing their educational needs and providing them with evidence-based education which meet those needs. For more information please visit their website http://www.cmemeeting.org.


Dr. Liakeas' has been named as one of America's Top Doctors® multiple times. Dr. George is also a recipient of over two dozen awards and recognitions for his compassionate care and commitment to the medical profession, including from the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Medical Association. He is the President of the Hellenic Medical Society of New York and Teaching Physician for the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York Medical College, Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, and Mercy College of Physician Assistants. Currently, Dr. Liakeas' is also the Medical Director of Smooth Synergy Cosmedical Spa and New York City Marathon Medical Captain. Dr. George is affiliated with Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital and has full privileges at Lenox Hill Hospital. By collaborating with CCPHP, Dr. Liakeas will be able to continue to provide his patients with outstanding, personalized care through a flexible membership model that will allow: same-day and next-day appointments, extended office visits, enhanced connectivity to over 48,000 Castle Connolly Top Doctors, the innovative and personalized SENS Solution Health Coaching program, and more. "For almost two decades, I have been practicing medicine, like a 'small town doc in our big city,'" says Dr. Liakeas. "Practicing medicine has always been very rewarding to me, and now the membership-based practice I've established with CCPHP will allow me to devote extended time and attention to my patients." "We are extremely happy to expand our roster of top concierge doctors with the launch of Dr. Liakeas' concierge practice," said Dean McElwain, President of CCPHP. "We love that Dr. Liakeas shares our approach to serving Members --- providing a more personalized, connected and collaborative approach to care." To learn more about Dr. Liakeas' practice and the benefits of membership, visit www.liakeasccphp.net or call 646-973-5098. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/george-liakeas-md-establishes-concierge-practice-in-collaboration-with-castle-connolly-private-health-partners-llc-300463394.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

Health care groups that represent doctors and patients are warning members of Congress that the House Republicans' plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act would hurt people who need insurance most. The groups are responding to the latest assessment by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, which concluded that the proposed American Health Care Act would leave 23 million more people without health insurance than under current law and would cut the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years. The latest CBO analysis came after House Republicans made changes to the bill earlier this month to try to ensure that people with pre-existing medical conditions can still get insurance. "Last-minute changes to the AHCA made by the House offered no real improvements," said Andrew Gurman, president of the American Medical Association, in a statement. "Millions of Americans will become uninsured —with low-income families on Medicaid being hit the hardest." Those concerns were echoed by group after group, including AARP, the American Hospital Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the Association of American Medical Colleges and the March of Dimes. The Republican plan would roll back the requirement under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, that everybody has to have insurance. It also would replace the ACA's income-based tax credits and subsidies with age-based credits that most analysts say are less generous. Older, low-income people would be hit hardest by the changes, the CBO says, because the proposed tax credits are less generous than those in Obamacare, while insurance for those older than 50 is the most expensive. As NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben reported, a 64-year-old making $26,500 would pay $1,700 in premiums annually under Obamacare. In a state making those "moderate" changes to its market under the proposed law, that 64-year-old would pay $13,600, and in a state with no waivers, the cost would be $16,100. But premiums would fall overall, the report said, because policies would offer fewer benefits and sicker people would leave the market because they wouldn't be able to afford insurance. The bill also would roll back the ACA's expansion of Medicaid. As a result, the CBO analysis estimates that 14 million people would lose Medicaid coverage, which accounts for most of the savings under the bill, $834 billion over 10 years. "The CBO confirmed the American Health Care Act will further lower premiums, deliver more immediate tax relief for individuals and families, and decrease the deficit," said Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee. But Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, called the bill "dangerous, deadly and deeply flawed." He said the proposal, which is now in the hands of the Senate, would eliminate the Prevention and Public Health Fund, which helps promote immunization, smoking cessation and other public health initiatives and makes up 12 percent of the budget of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CBO reports that the bill could destabilize individual insurance markets in some states, leaving unhealthy Americans unable to buy insurance. But the CBO also acknowledges that its analysis includes some uncertainty, in part because the AHCA would allow states to get waivers that would exempt their insurers from many Obamacare coverage rules. This includes what are called essential health benefits, a list of medical services, such as mental health care or prescription drugs, that plans are required to cover under the current law. The CBO estimated how many states might accept those waivers and what they might put in place of the current rules. It figures that states making up about half the population would apply for a waiver of some sort, reducing the benefits that insurers in those state will offer. "Services or benefits likely to be excluded from [essential health benefits] in some states include maternity care, mental health and substance abuse benefits, rehabilitative and habilitative services, and pediatric dental benefits," the report said. States could also get waivers that would allow insurers to charge more for people with pre-existing conditions, a practice banned under the ACA. "Over time, it would become more difficult for less healthy people (including people with pre-existing medical conditions) in those states to purchase insurance because their premiums would continue to increase rapidly," the CBO wrote. Republicans argue that by allowing insurers to sell less comprehensive insurance, premiums will fall and more people will buy basic coverage. And their bill includes money for states to create so-called high-risk pools in which people with medical conditions can buy coverage if commercial insurers refuse them. But two small-business groups, the Main Street Alliance and the Small Business Majority, said the bill could hurt their members, many of whom rely on the individual insurance market for their coverage. "Many solo entrepreneurs would likely be forced out of the insurance market entirely. This means many small firms would close up shop while others would never get off the ground," said John Arensmeyer, founder of Small Business Majority, which represents 55,000 small businesses.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Continuing Education Company Inc, a leading live CME educator for primary care physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants, has added the option of live webcasts for most of their conferences. These webcasts enable clinicians to watch the live conference from anywhere as long as they have an internet connection. At the conclusion of the webcast, they will receive the same number of credits as if attending the conference in person. There are several benefits of a live webcast including no travel expenses, efficient use of time, no need to take off from work (they can just schedule their hours around the half day sessions) and easy participation. After registering, the clinician will receive login details and after watching the webcast, they complete an online evaluation and receive their CME credits and certificate. The webcast can be viewed on any PC, MAC or mobile device and must be watched live in order to receive credits. Barbara Lyons, VP of Continuing Education Company says "Live webcast CME is very convenient for our busy Primary Care clinicians. They can receive quality education from the comfort of their homes or offices and instantly print out their certificate for their records." All conferences have the live webcast option with the exception of Maui and the Alaska Cruise. Continuing Education Company, Inc. (CEC) is an independent, non-profit, 501 (c)(3) continuing medical education organization. They have been developing and presenting continuing medical education programs for over 25 years. Their mission is to develop and provide educational opportunities to improve the skills and knowledge of medical and healthcare professionals. They accomplish this mission by offering American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and ABIM MOC accredited live CME conferences and online courses. The mission of Continuing Education Company, Inc. (CEC) is to improve public health by developing and providing educational opportunities to advance the skills and knowledge of physicians and other healthcare professionals. This mission is accomplished by assisting healthcare professionals in assessing their educational needs and providing them with evidence-based education which meet those needs. For more information, please visit their website at http://www.cmemeeting.org.


WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--America’s Health Insurance Plans, American Academy of Family Physicians, American Benefits Council, American Hospital Association, American Medical Association, Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, Federation of American Hospitals, and U.S. Chamber of Commerce together issued the following statement in response to recent remarks made by Congressional leaders and the Administration on cost-sharing reduction (CSR) payments, which go for the direct benefit of health care consumers. “Cost-sharing reductions are used solely to help those who need it most—low- and moderate-income consumers. These funds, which are built into their benefits, reduce their out of pocket costs such as copayments and deductibles when they receive care. Without these funds, consumers’ access to care is jeopardized, their premiums will increase dramatically, and they will be left with even fewer coverage options. “Funding this critical financial assistance for at least two years is the only way to protect these consumers. Clarity and commitment to this funding is needed to eliminate confusion and anxiety for consumers, and to allow health plans to make timely and appropriate decisions about market participation in 2018. “As medical professionals, insurers providing healthcare services and coverage to hundreds of millions of Americans, and business leaders concerned with maintaining a stable health insurance marketplace for consumers, we believe it is imperative that the Administration and Congress fund the cost-sharing reduction program. We will continue to work with lawmakers and the Administration so Americans can access the affordable coverage and high-quality care they deserve.”


News Article | June 24, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this April 3, 2017, file photo, the Senate side of the Capitol is seen in Washington. Republicans in full control of government are on the brink of history-making changes to the nation’s health care system, but “Obamacare” is only half the story _ and many people may not realize that. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans in full control of government are on the brink of history-making changes to the nation's health care system. The impact for consumers would go well beyond "Obamacare." Former President Barack Obama's signature law is usually associated with subsidized insurance markets like HealthCare.gov. But the Affordable Care Act also expanded Medicaid. Not only would the GOP legislation scale back coverage through the insurance markets and phase out the Medicaid expansion, it would also make fundamental changes to the broader Medicaid program. The federal-state program covers low-income people, from newborns to elderly nursing home residents, from special-needs kids to young adults caught in the opioid epidemic. House Republicans have passed their health care bill, and Senate GOP leaders are driving toward a vote next week. President Donald Trump is waiting, eager to deliver on a campaign promise to repeal the law. Against fast-moving developments, a look at some major issues for consumers. As health care costs have kept climbing, employers cut back on coverage, and Medicaid passed Medicare as the nation's largest public insurance program. It now covers about 70 million people, including children and able-bodied adults mostly served by private managed care plans. The GOP's biggest Medicaid change involves limiting future federal financing. Since its inception, Medicaid has been an open-ended entitlement, with Washington matching a share of what each state spends. Instead, Republicans propose a per-beneficiary cap. In addition, the GOP would phase out added financing that Obama's law provided as an incentive for states to expand the program and cover more low-income adults. About 11 million are covered by the expansion. The Congressional Budget Office estimated the House bill would reduce federal Medicaid spending by $834 billion over 10 years, and the program would cover about 14 million fewer people by 2026, a 17 percent reduction. Governors of both parties have warned Congress that would mean a cost shift to states that undermines coverage for the vulnerable. Medicaid limits got very little attention in the 2016 presidential campaign. The idea was a relatively late addition to Trump's talking points. Indeed, candidate Trump had started out promising no cuts to Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid. Economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a longtime GOP adviser, says the Republican approach is "180 degrees different in its economic and budgetary philosophy," from the course steered by Obama. The Medicaid limit would move the nation closer to putting public health care programs on a budget, fiscal discipline that conservatives say is long overdue. But the human consequences could be politically volatile. "No one wins on health care policy," observed Holtz-Eakin. WHAT DOCTORS ARE SAYING Groups representing doctors and hospitals are overwhelmingly opposed to the Republican approach, because it's likely to result in millions more uninsured people. Consumer organizations like AARP are also opposed. Under Obama, the nation's uninsured rate dropped below 9 percent, a historic low. Progress has stalled, partly because "Obamacare" is politically divisive. Now, the uninsured rate may start climbing again, because both the House and Senate bills cut federal financing and repeal an unpopular requirement to carry health insurance. It "would have a profoundly negative impact on Americans," said John Meigs, president of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Some Republicans argue that a Medicaid card or an "Obamacare" policy means little because either the doctor doesn't accept notoriously low Medicaid fees, or high deductibles under the health law keep patients from coming in. But doctors see a health insurance card as a ticket into the system, so patients can be screened for chronic conditions that can ultimately lead to serious illnesses. Obama's law made many preventive services free of charge to the patient. Dr. Mott Blair of Wallace, N.C., recalls a patient who got a colonoscopy that found a polyp, which undetected could have led to colon cancer. "Now we are able to bring them in and get their blood sugars down, their blood pressure down," Blair said in a recent interview. "They're not going to have a disastrous complication like a stroke or a heart attack, at least not for the foreseeable future."


A Pioneer In 'Flat-Fee Primary Care' Had To Close Its Clinics. What Went Wrong? In recent years, a small but growing number of medical practices embraced a buffet approach to primary care, offering patients unlimited services for a modest flat fee — say, $50 to $150 per month — instead of billing them a la carte for every office visit and test. But a pioneer in the field — Seattle-based Qliance — shut its public clinics as of June 15, and some health care analysts are questioning whether the approach to medical care is valid and viable. This style of medical practice is called "direct primary care," and many doctors and patients say they like the arrangement. Typically, these physicians don't accept insurance — which frees the doctors from having to get preapprovals from insurers on treatment and lets them skip the paperwork involved in insurance claims. Doctors say that allows them more time and energy for their patients. Meanwhile, patients say they like being able to consult with their doctor or a nurse practitioner as often as they need to, at a relatively low cost. (Some employers buy the service for their workers.) Patients who are signed up for the plan still need to carry a regular insurance plan (typically a high-deductible policy) to cover hospitalizations, consultations with specialists and other services. In theory, the result should be better health for patients and lower health care costs overall. But some who analyze the use of health care are concerned that the approach encourages the "worried well" to get more care than they need. They describe unlimited primary care as a blunt instrument that doesn't necessarily improve the odds that patients will get evidence-based services that improve their health. Others argue it's important to find a way to provide cost-effective primary care within the health insurance context, not outside it. Although only a sliver of medical practices operate this way, the number is on the rise, says Shawn Martin, a senior vice president at the American Academy of Family Physicians. He puts the figure at about 3 percent. Qliance, founded in 2007, was an early leader in this type of care. With startup funding from high-profile investors Jeff Bezos and Michael Dell, the company was serving 35,000 patients at several clinics in the Seattle area by 2015. Those patients included individuals, workers at large companies like Expedia and Comcast, and Medicaid patients through a contract with the state's Medicaid insurer. In a 2015 press release, Qliance said medical claims for its patients were 20 percent lower than those of other patients because, among other things, Qliance members went to the emergency room less often, were hospitalized less frequently and saw fewer specialists. By early 2017, though, Qliance was faltering. The company had lost some of the big employers, and its patient base had shrunk to 13,000. Last week, it closed the last of its private clinics, though its CEO, Dr. Erika Bliss, will continue to operate one site that provides occupational health services for Seattle firefighters. In general, Bliss says, the market is reluctant to pay what is required for primary care to flourish. In some cases, she says, payers were resistant to rewarding Qliance even when it exceeded its targets for quality and savings. "The bottom line is it's not for free," Bliss says. The closure took January Gens, a 45-year-old Seattle resident, by surprise. A Qliance patient for a couple of years, Gens had worked with her primary care doctor to manage crippling pain from endometriosis. The $79 monthly fee was worth every penny, she thought. She had been able to reduce the dosage of some of her medications and was awaiting a referral to start physical therapy when she learned that Qliance was shutting down. Now she's not sure what she'll do. "I had felt very lucky to have found Qliance, to know I had a doctor and could always be seen when needed without causing more damage to the family budget," Gens says. "Now it's just gone." Patients who have chronic conditions that need ongoing management may benefit from this sort of flat-fee program, says Dr. A. Mark Fendrick, an internist who directs the University of Michigan's Center for Value-Based Insurance Design. But for people who are generally healthy and without symptoms that need to be diagnosed, "unlimited primary care is no guarantee that the services that are provided will improve the health of those people," he says. As an example, Fendrick notes that the annual checkup — one of the most popular primary care services — isn't clinically helpful for most people, according to the Choosing Wisely initiative, a program of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation that identifies overused and unnecessary medical services. An examination of research related to direct primary care practices, published in the November-December 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, found that they charged patients an average $77.38 per month. In contrast, "concierge" or "boutique" medical practices — which are similar to "direct primary care" programs, but charge more — typically have higher fees for patients — averaging $182.76, the study found — and they generally also bill insurers for their services. However, there was a paucity of data related to the quality of care provided by these practices, the study found. Some analysts say that while they're sympathetic to doctors' frustration with insurance companies' intrusion into patient care and the billing hassles that go along with that, the answer isn't to turn their backs on insurance. "I think, absolutely, this type of care could be done inside insurance," says Robert Berenson, a fellow at the Urban Institute who specializes in health care delivery. "But it means we have to learn how to pay within the system for the things that doctors should be doing — and are doing — in direct primary care." As things stand now, the direct-care model can create difficulties for some patients. Take the situation in which someone in this sort of practice goes to his primary care provider for an earache, but antibiotics don't work and he needs to be referred to an ear, nose and throat specialist. That patient, who likely has a high-deductible insurance policy to cover care that goes beyond the primary practitioner's purview, will probably be on the hook financially for the entire cost of medical services provided by the specialist — rather than insurance paying a share. Qliance's Bliss scoffs at the idea that patients may get stuck paying more out of pocket if they have direct primary care. Most people these days have high-deductible health plans, she says. "The reality is that, unless you have Medicaid, you are on the hook no matter what." Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent news service that is part of the nonpartisan Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Follow Michelle Andrews on Twitter @mandrews110.


Bird G.C.,American Academy of Family Physicians
Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions | Year: 2013

Introduction: Primary care in the United States faces unprecedented challenges from an aging population and the accompanying prevalence of chronic disease. In response, continuing medical education (CME) initiatives have begun to adopt the principles of performance improvement (PI) into their design, although currently there is a dearth of evidence from national initiatives supporting the effectiveness of this methodology. The specific aim of this study was to demonstrate the value of a national PI-CME activity to improve the performance of physicians treating patients with diabetes. Methods: We analyzed data from the American Academy of Family Physicians' METRIC® PI-CME activity in a cohort of family physician learners. The study utilized the 3-stage design standard approved for PI-CME. Baseline and follow-up performance data across a range of clinical and systems-based measures were compared in aggregate. Results: Data were assessed for 509 learners who completed the activity. Statistically significant changes occurred both for self-assessment of a range of practice aspects and for diabetes care measures. Learners recognized that the organization of their practices had improved, and mechanisms were in place for better staff feedback, as well as aspects of patient self-management. Based on the clinical data obtained from 11 538 patient charts, 6 out of 8 diabetes measures were significantly improved. Discussion: The activity appears to have had a positive, measurable impact on the medical practice of learners and suggests that, when appropriately designed and executed, PI-CME on a national scale can be a useful vehicle to influence performance change in physicians and to inform future CME activities. © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

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