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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Deborah H. Atkin, MD of Dermatology & Laser of Del Mar discusses how ThermiRF® and its trio of applications can rejuvenate the face, body, and feminine anatomy with minimal downtime DEL MAR, CA--(Marketwired - May 10, 2017) - Injectable radiofrequency energy is an innovative new technology that can rejuvenate skin and tighten muscles, explains Del Mar dermatologist Deborah H. Atkin. She says many individuals are bothered by common signs of aging like skin laxity, but they may also wish to avoid surgical procedures to correct them. One solution Dr. Atkin offers is ThermiRF®, a multi-modality non-surgical skin tightening treatment that can enhance the appearance of the face, body, and feminine anatomy with minimal downtime. ThermiRF® is a state-of-the-art body contouring platform with a selection of advanced applications designed for cosmetic enhancement. Dr. Atkin says she uses three of the most popular at her San Diego-based skincare practice: ThermiTight®, ThermiSmooth® Face, and ThermiVa®. She adds that each modality provides a different benefit and is applied in subtly different ways. ThermiTight® heats the underlying structures of the skin to firm them as well as to stimulate collagen production. This is achieved by placing a special electrode into the skin and delivering the radiofrequency waves directly into the targeted region. Dr. Atkin says that the process is brief and made to be as comfortable as possible for the patient. She adds that ThermiTight® can be used on the neck, arms, knees, abdomen, buttocks, and inner thighs. ThermiSmooth® Face applies the energy to the surface of the skin rather than into the subdermal layer, and Dr. Atkin says this approach is completely non-invasive. Even though the treatment is topical, she indicates the radiofrequency energy can reach into the deeper tissues for a noticeable improvement in many common signs of aging. Dr. Atkin says ThermiSmooth® is typically used on the forehead, cheeks, around the eyes, around the mouth, and on the chin. ThermiVa® is the application used to help restore the youthful look and function of the feminine anatomy. Dr. Atkin explains that a narrow applicator is used to externally and internally firm skin and improve muscle tone, helping improve bladder control, reduce dryness, and increase sexual sensation. She says this technique can also minimize the appearance of prominent labial skin for patients who prefer a non-surgical alternative to Labiaplasty. Dr. Atkin says that patients can usually return to normal activity the same or the next day, depending on the application used and the individual's unique rate of healing. Some ThermiRF® therapies are effective with a single session, while Dr. Atkin adds that others may require a series of treatments. She encourages people interested in learning more about this innovative platform to contact an experienced, board certified dermatologist who has extensive training using this device. She says, "ThermiRF® makes it possible to smooth and tighten from head to toe! We are amazing by the low downtime, comfort, and ease to patients." About Deborah H. Atkin, MD Certified by the American Board of Dermatology, Dr. Deborah Atkin is the founder and medical director of Dermatology & Laser of Del Mar, located in the San Diego area. She earned her undergraduate degree from California State University, Northridge and University of California Santa Barbara, and her medical degree from University of California Los Angeles. Dr. Atkin completed additional training at the University of Arizona and Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. She is an active member of several professional organizations, including the American Academy of Dermatology and the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Dr. Atkin is available for interview upon request. For more information about Dr. Atkin and Dermatology & Laser of Del Mar, please visit dermdelmar.com and facebook.com/dermdelmar. To view the original source of this press release, click here: https://www.dermdelmar.com/news-room/minimally-invasive-thermirf-offers-del-mar-residents-trio-of-benefits


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Dr. George Ray Russell, MD, Dermatologist to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. George Ray Russell is a highly trained and qualified dermatologist with a vast expertise in all facets of his work, especially laser resurfacing and skin education. Dr. Russell has been in practice for more than 44 years and is currently serving patients in Boulder, Colorado. He is affiliated with Boulder Community Health. Dr. Russell’s career in medicine began in 1967 when he graduated with his Medical Degree from the University of Texas Medical Branch. He is certified by the American Board of Dermatology, and maintains a professional membership with the Badger Clark Memorial Society, the American Academy of Dermatology, the Pacific Dermatologic Association, and the Colorado Dermatologic Society. In addition to practicing medicine, Dr. Russell is renowned as a cowboy poet. He has written poetry and songs all his life and has performed for non-profit fundraisers such as The Colorado Special Olympics, Historic Boulder, Center of the American West, Medicine Horse Program, and the Albanian Health Fund. Furthermore, he is the first American Dermatologist to visit Albania and teach, as well as the first to perform cowboy poetry in the Balkan country. Dr. Russell attributes his success to his love of teaching, which was transcended upon him from coming from a long line of teachers. Learn more about Dr. Russell here: http://www.cowboypoetry.com/georgerussell.htm and by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Hypochlorous acid was recently highlighted in an independent review published in the March 2017 issue of Journal of Drugs in Dermatology. Authored by Kristin Totoraitis BS, Joel L. Cohen, MD. and Adam Friedman, MD., the article assesses the impact of various agents encompassing topical antiseptics including chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine; topical antibiotics including neomycin and bacitracin; and hypochlorous acid (such as Sonoma’s patented Microcyn® Technology) on the optimization of post-surgical wound healing. Sonoma Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: SNOA, warrants SNOAW), is a specialty pharmaceutical company that develops and markets unique and effective solutions for the treatment of dermatological conditions and advanced tissue care. Although low risk, the report recognizes that one notable barrier to proper wound healing is surgical site infection. The use of various antibiotics and antiseptics attempt to address this issue, however these products are not without consequence. The overuse of topical antibiotics as a prophylaxis for infection has contributed to increased bacterial resistance, and in fact is no longer recommended by the American Academy of Dermatology in clean post-surgical wounds. Also noted in the report, topical antiseptics can have a cytotoxic effect on keratinocytes and may actually impede wound healing as a result. Some can actually produce both otologic and ocular toxic effects when used on the face, recently highlighted in the dermatologic literature In summary, the report opines: “Emerging products, such as hypochlorous acid, may be a potential alternative to the more commonly used agents, as it has effective antimicrobial actions and minimal adverse effects.” “Hypochlorous acid is a well-established broad-spectrum antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and anti-itch agent that our own immune system produces for these important purposes,” said Adam Friedman, MD, and lead author of the report. “The overall issue with capitalizing clinically on these properties is both ease of application and product stability. A topical formulation that allows the patient to easily use hypochlorous acid with assured stability is highly advantageous.” The abstract of the report can be found at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28301615 Sonoma Pharmaceuticals’ portfolio of hypochlorous acid-based dermatology products include Alevicyn™ Dermal Spray, Alevicyn™ Antipruritic Gel, Subuderm™ Topical Gel and Celacyn™ Scar Management Gel. More product information is available at http://www.intraderm.com, a fully owned subsidiary of Sonoma Pharmaceticals. About Sonoma Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Sonoma is a specialty pharmaceutical company that develops and markets unique and effective solutions for the treatment of dermatological conditions and advanced tissue care. The company’s products, which are sold throughout the United States and internationally, have improved outcomes for more than five million patients globally by reducing infections, itch, pain, scarring and harmful inflammatory responses. The company's headquarters are in Petaluma, California, with manufacturing operations in the United States and Latin America. European marketing and sales are headquartered in Roermond, Netherlands. More information can be found at http://www.sonomapharma.com. Forward-Looking Statements Except for historical information herein, matters set forth in this press release are forward-looking within the meaning of the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including statements about the commercial and technology progress and future financial performance of Sonoma Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its subsidiaries (the “Company”). These forward-looking statements are identified by the use of words such as “believe,” “achieve,” and “strive,” among others. Forward-looking statements in this press release are subject to certain risks and uncertainties inherent in the Company’s business that could cause actual results to vary, including such risks that regulatory clinical and guideline developments may change, scientific data may not be sufficient to meet regulatory standards or receipt of required regulatory clearances or approvals, clinical results may not be replicated in actual patient settings, protection offered by the Company’s patents and patent applications may be challenged, invalidated or circumvented by its competitors, the available market for the Company’s products will not be as large as expected, the Company’s products will not be able to penetrate one or more targeted markets, revenues will not be sufficient to fund further development and clinical studies, the Company may not meet its future capital needs, as well as uncertainties relative to varying product formulations and a multitude of diverse regulatory and marketing requirements in different countries and municipalities, and other risks detailed from time to time in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission including its annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2016. The Company disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law. Sonoma Pharmaceuticals®, IntraDerm Pharmaceutials®, Sebuderm™, Alevicyn™, Celacyn™ and Microcyn® Technology are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sonoma Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective owners. Media and Investor Contact: Sonoma Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Dan McFadden VP of Public and Investor Relations (425) 753-2105 dmcfadden(at)Sonomais.com


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SCHAUMBURG, IL--(Marketwired - May 16, 2017) -  Sunscreen can be a valuable tool for skin cancer prevention -- but only if it's used correctly. When applying sunscreen, many people make mistakes that could compromise their protection from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays, which may increase their risk of skin cancer. Some of those mistakes are highlighted in new research published online today in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. Researchers set up free sunscreen dispensers at the Minnesota State Fair and observed 2,187 people using them over the course of 93 hours. Only one-third (33 percent) of people applied sunscreen to all exposed skin, and just 38 percent were wearing sun-protective clothing, hats or sunglasses. Additionally, utilization of the free sunscreen dispensers decreased significantly on cloudy days. "These results highlight some of the ways people use sunscreen incorrectly," says board-certified dermatologist Ingrid Polcari, MD, FAAD, an assistant professor in the department of dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis and one of the study authors. "To get the best possible sun protection, it's important to wear protective clothing, such as long-sleeved shirts and pants, and to apply sunscreen to all exposed skin, not just your face and arms." "Everyone should apply sunscreen every time they go outside," Dr. Polcari adds. "Even on cloudy days, up to 80 percent of the sun's harmful UV rays can reach your skin." The researchers also observed that more women than men utilized the free sunscreen dispensers at the state fair; while 51 percent of the fair attendees were women, they accounted for 57 percent of the sunscreen users. "Research has shown that women are more likely than men to use sunscreen, but it's vital that men use it too," says board-certified dermatologist Darrell S. Rigel, MD, FAAD, a clinical professor in the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology at New York University. "Men over 50 have a higher risk than the general population of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and UV exposure is the most preventable skin cancer risk factor, so it's important for men of all ages to protect themselves from the sun's harmful rays by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing and applying sunscreen." Dr. Rigel offers the following tips for choosing a sunscreen: 1. Choose a sunscreen with an SPF 30 or higher. While no sunscreen can filter out all of the sun's UVB rays, SPF 30 sunscreens block 97 percent of the sun's UVB rays. 2. Look for the words "broad spectrum." This means the sunscreen will protect against both UVA rays (which cause premature skin aging) and UVB rays (which cause sunburn). Both types of UV rays can lead to skin cancer. 3. Look for the words "water resistant." No sunscreen is completely waterproof, but water-resistant sunscreens can provide protection for wet or sweaty skin for 40 or 80 minutes, as indicated on the label. All sunscreens should be reapplied every two hours, or after swimming or sweating. 4. For sensitive skin, choose a sunscreen with the active ingredients zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. Those with sensitive skin also should avoid sunscreens that contain fragrance, oils and para-aminobenzoic acid, also known as PABA. "The best type of sunscreen is one you'll use," Dr. Rigel says, "so find one you like and apply it to all exposed skin before heading outside." These tips are demonstrated in "What to Look for in a Sunscreen," a video posted to the AAD website and YouTube channel. This video is part of the AAD's Video of the Month series, which offers tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair and nails. A new video in the series posts to the AAD website and YouTube channel each month. For more information on skin cancer prevention and detection, visit the AAD website SpotSkinCancer.org. There, you can also find instructions on how to perform a skin self-exam, download a body mole map for tracking changes in your skin, and find free SPOTme® skin cancer screenings in your area. SPOT Skin Cancer™ is the AAD's campaign to create a world without skin cancer through public awareness, community outreach programs and services, and advocacy that promote the prevention, detection and care of skin cancer. Infographic: How to Select a Sunscreen How to apply sunscreen Prevent skin cancer About the AAD Headquartered in Schaumburg, Ill., the American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of more than 19,000 physicians worldwide, the AAD is committed to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair and nails; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin, hair and nails. The Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology was the third most-cited dermatology journal in 2016. For more information, contact the AAD at 1-888-462-DERM (3376) or aad.org. Follow the AAD on Facebook (American Academy of Dermatology), Twitter (@AADskin) or YouTube (AcademyofDermatology). To view this release in a media-rich format, go to: http://aad.new-media-release.com/2017/sunscreen/


— Market Highlights Actinic keratosis (AKs) are among the most frequent diagnosis in dermatological practice. Exponential increase in the incidence of AKs and their potential to evolve to squamous cell carcinoma have made the condition an increasingly important strategic health issue. AKs are the collections of abnormal skin cells known as keratinocytes. They are found in the upper layers of skin that developed after prolonged exposure to sun light and ultraviolet light. They are the strongest predictor of non-melanoma skin cancer in an individual, while some actinic keratoses will develop into an invasive form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). These spots tends to occur on the areas of high sun exposure such as the face, back of hands, ears and lips. They are most common in people who are in their 40s. global actinic keratosis treatment market is expected to grow at a CAGR of ~5% during the period 2016 to 2022 The market for actinic keratosis treatment is growing steadily. This is attributed to the factors such as; increasing incidence of actinic keratosis in different regions. As per Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, in Australia 40% to 60% of adults are affected with actinic keratosis. The reason for high incidence of actinic keratosis in Australian people is that they live in the proximity of the equator and the vast population is fair skinned individuals. However, apart from the factors leading to the growth of this market, there are some restraints hampering the market growth such as lesser awareness in developing nations for actinic keratosis and related treatments. Taste the market data and market information presented through more than 50 market data tables and figures spread in 110 numbers of pages of the project report. Avail the in-depth table of content TOC & market synopsis on “Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market Research Report- Global Forecast to 2022” The Hottest Trend in the Market Actinic Keratoses (AK) are pre-cancerous lesions that are developed on sun-exposed areas of skin. They most commonly appear as rough, dry and scaly patches on the skin sometimes hyperkeratotic lesion as a result of prolonged and repeated sun exposure. Actinic keratoses are warning signs that indicate that the skin has been damaged by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and that there may be a higher risk of developing skin cancer. According to American Academy of Dermatology, actinic keratoses is the second leading cause of skin cancer deaths in the US, around 40% of all Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCCs) begin as actinic keratoses and approximately 50% of the world's population suffers from skin problems resulting from AK. There are many treatments available to treat the actinic keratoses such as cryotherapy, curettage with or without electrosurgery, laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, chemical peeling and topical treatments. Out of which cryotherapy is by far the most commonly employed therapeutic modality in the US. Segmentation: On the basis of surgical procedures • hotodynamic therapy, • cryotherapy, • curettage and desiccation, • laser surgery, • combination therapy • others. On the basis of prescription products • fluorouracil cream, • imiquimod cream, • ingenol mebutate gel, • diclofenac gel • others. On the basis of end users • hospitals • clinics • oncology centers • dermatology service centers • others. 1. Introduction 1.1 Definition 1.2 Scope of Study 1.3 Research Objective 1.4 Assumptions & Limitations 1.5 Market Structure: 2 Research Methodology 2.1 Research Process 2.2 Primary Research 2.3 Secondary Research 3 Market Dynamics 3.1 Drivers 3.2 Restraints 3.3 Opportunities 3.4 Challenges 3.5 Macroeconomic Indicators 4 Market Factor Analysis 4.1 Porter’s five forces model 4.1.1 Bargaining Power of suppliers 4.1.2 Bargaining Power of Customer 4.1.3 Intensity of Competitor’s 4.1.4 Threat of New Entrants 5 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, by Surgical Procedure Continue….. Key questions answered in this report • What will the market size be in 2022 and what will the growth rate be? • What are the key market trends? • What is driving this market? • What are the challenges to market growth? • Who are the key vendors in this market space? • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors? • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? Related Report Chromatography systems Market information, by type (gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, and others), by end users (pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, hospital and research laboratories, agriculture and food industry, and others) - Forecast to 2022..know more about this report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/chromatography-systems-market-2324 About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services. MRFR team have supreme objective to provide the optimum quality market research and intelligence services to our clients. Our market research studies by products, services, technologies, applications, end users, and market players for global, regional, and country level market segments, enable our clients to see more, know more, and do more, which help to answer all their most important questions. For more information, please visit https://www.marketresearchfuture.com


-- In recognition of Melanoma Awareness Month, Dr. Corinne Howington of Low Country Dermatology will lead a skin cancer awareness excursion — "Melanoma, Take a Hike!" — on Sunday, May 21 at 3 p.m. at Skidaway Island State Park.Howington and her staff will lead a three-mile hike along the park's scenic trails, sharing facts and prevention techniques for melanoma and taking questions. Water, sunscreen and some light refreshments will be provided.National Melanoma Skin Cancer Awareness Month, designated by the American Academy of Dermatology, is celebrated in May to raise awareness of the risk of skin cancer and increase the chances of early detection."For those of us who live along the southern coastline, staying out of the sun is often not practical or desirable," Howington said. "It's important for everyone to learn some simple but essential ways to protect their skin from the sun's dangerous UV rays before they and their family head off to enjoy the great outdoors."Howington is a board-certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. She and her staff will give participants SPF30 sunscreen, which has been shown to prevent the onset of skin cancer by a whopping 80 percent.They also will share "did you know" facts during the hike, such as:• Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and is the leading cause of death from skin disease.• The American Cancer Society estimates that 87,110 new melanomas will be diagnosed this year alone and will result in 10,000 deaths.• Rates for melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years, and melanoma accounts for nearly half of all cancers, according to the American Cancer Society.• Although clouds block some of the sun's skin-damaging ultraviolet radiation, as much as 80 percent still reaches the Earth's surface.• Anyone can develop melanoma. Skin cancer rates are lower for African Americans and Latinos than other groups, but their survival outcomes are poorer, partially because more aggressive skin cancers strike them disproportionately.• Indications of potential skin cancer include moles or growths that are asymmetrical, have an irregular border, exhibit changes in color, have a diameter larger than the size of a pencil eraser or have evolved in size or thickness. Self-examine your skin; when caught early, melanoma is highly curable.Tickets for the event are $35, which includes the parking fee for the park. Proceeds will benefit the Curtis & Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute in Savannah. Participants are asked to meet the group at Picnic Area-A after entering the park.Tickets and more information for Melanoma, Take a Hike! Skin Cancer Awareness Excursion with Low Country Dermatology can be found at http://lcderm.com/ melanoma-take- hike/ ABOUT LOW COUNTRY DERMATOLOGYLow Country Dermatology specializes in the treatment of adult and pediatric diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Dr. Corinne Howington is a board certified dermatologist with expertise in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. Low Country Dermatology is located at 310 Eisenhower Dr. Suite 12A Savannah, GA 31406. For more information, visit lcderm.com.Media Contact:Cecilia RussoCecilia Russo Marketinginfo@crussomarketing.com912-665-0005


SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA, May 19, 2017-- Dr. Hae Shin Chung has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.With nearly two and a half decades of practiced professional experience behind her, Dr. Chung has excelled in private practice since 2004, as a dermatologist for and owner of the Pureskin Dermatology Clinic. A specialized clinic, they provide one-stop dermatological treatments that aim to make it seem as if no treatment was ever performed; her motto is "everyone will notice, but no one will know." Upon her commencement from Yonsei University the first time, she started at the school as an intern. From there, she transferred to the University of California San Francisco and eventually returned to South Korea in numerous dermatological roles.An alumna of the Yonsei University College of Medicine, Dr. Chung has earned an MD, Ph.D. and two master's degrees. In order to keep abreast of changes in the field, she affiliates herself with the Korean Dermatological Association and the American Academy of Dermatology. Throughout her career, she has contributed her plethora of knowledge to "Women's Dermatology," which was released through Parthenon Publishing, as well as numerous other related publications in such journals as the International Journal of Dermatology and the British Journal of Dermatology. A board certified dermatologist, she was named a Living Legend in 2003 through the International Biographical Center Cambridge, England 40th Anniversary Edition and even had her own medical talk show on MBN and YTN.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com Contact:Fred Marks844-394-6946


Researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found patients with hyperpigmentation, a medical disorder that leads to darkening or increase in the natural color of the skin, are more likely to use sunscreen but do not use other protection measures. Sun protection is recommended for maintaining healthy skin and preventing skin cancer, but for patients with hyperpigmentation it is also essential to their treatment. There have been many studies on the general populations' sun-protective behaviors, but until now there has been little research into how hyperpigmentation patients are shielding themselves from the sun. The survey looked at 404 adults who had a diagnosis of cutaneous hyperpigmentation. The majority of the patients reported using sunscreen, a number significantly higher than the general public. Women were more likely to wear sunscreen, as were white and Hispanic patients, which is consistent with other studies. Patient's answers were also significantly affected by their particular diagnosis. Those with melasma, which causes brown patches on the face, were more likely to wear sunscreen than those with other disorders. While researchers found hyperpigmentation led to an increased use of sunscreen among patients, few reported taking other sun protection measures or reapplying sunscreen every two hours. Nearly half of the sunscreen users didn't know if their sunscreen provided broad spectrum protection. "It is important for providers to educate patients on the many ways to keep their skin safe in the sun," said Neelam Vashi, MD, Director of the Center for Ethnic Skin at Boston University and Boston Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Dermatology at BUSM, who led the study. "It's encouraging that so many patients are utilizing sunscreen, but we can still improve the practice of safe sun behaviors by improving counseling early in patients' diagnosis, recommending sunscreen use for all ethnicities, and providing a wide range of methods to decrease sun exposure." The study was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology and was funded by the Boston University Department of Dermatology.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AURORA, Colo. (April 18, 2017) - Cannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The new study, published online recently in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, summarizes the current literature on the subject and concludes that pharmaceuticals containing cannabinoids may be effective against eczema, psoriasis, atopic and contact dermatitis. Currently, 28 states allow comprehensive medical cannabis programs with close to 1 in 10 adult cannabis users in the U.S. utilizing the drug for medical reasons. As researchers examine the drug for use in treating nausea, chronic pain and anorexia, more and more dermatologists are looking into its ability to fight a range of skin disease. "Perhaps the most promising role for cannabinoids is in the treatment of itch," said the study's senior author Dr. Robert Dellavalle, MD, associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He noted that in one study, eight of 21 patients who applied a cannabinoid cream twice a day for three weeks completely eliminated severe itching or pruritus. The drug may have reduced the dry skin that gave rise to the itch. Dellavalle believes the primary driver in these cannabinoid treatments could be their anti-inflammatory properties. In the studies he and his fellow researchers reviewed, they found that THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) the active ingredient in marijuana, reduced swelling and inflammation in mice. At the same time, mice with melanoma saw significant inhibition of tumor growth when injected with THC. "These are topical cannabinoid drugs with little or no psychotropic effect that can be used for skin disease," Dellavalle said. Still, he cautioned that most of these studies are based on laboratory models and large-scale clinical trials have not been performed. That may change as more and more states legalize cannabis. Dellavalle said for those who have used other medications for itch and skin disease without success, trying a cannabinoid is a viable option especially if it has no psychotropic effect. He did not recommend such medications for cancer based on current evidence. "These diseases cause a lot of problems for people and have a direct impact on their quality of life," he said. "The treatments are currently being bought over the internet and we need to educate dermatologists and patients about the potential uses of them." The other authors of the study include Jessica S. Mounessa, BS, Julia A. Siegel, BA and Cory A. Dunnick, MD.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Suzanne Bruce and Associates (http://www.sba-skincare.com) has added the FDA-approved lip augmentation filler JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC to the Houston practice's menu of services, which includes a range of cosmetic and medical dermatology treatments. "We're excited to offer JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA to our patients who want fuller lips while still looking natural," says Dr. Suzanne Bruce, who founded the practice in 1997. "In addition to lip augmentation, VOLBELLA can also soften the fine lines that develop around the lips." JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC, approved last year by the FDA, represents an improvement over other fillers being used for lip augmentation. Like other JUVÉDERM products, VOLBELLA is a hyaluronic acid-based filler, but it's formulated as a softer, smoother gel that can be more easily injected. A press release from Allergan, the maker of JUVÉDERM products, explains that the hyaluronic acid used in VOLBELLA is less concentrated, making it less likely to absorb water. This leads to less swelling and a more natural look. "One of the primary concerns among patients considering lip augmentation is that they'll end up with the dreaded 'fish lips,'" says Dr. Bruce, who serves on the Allergan Medical Aesthetics Advisory Council and is recognized as one of the leading dermatologists in Houston. "My patients want subtle results that still make a noticeable difference. And that's exactly what I can consistently achieve with JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA." What makes JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC unlike any other injectable dermal filler currently on the market in the U.S. is its patented VYCROSS® filler technology. This is the same technology behind the smoother, softer gel that was initially introduced in JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC. VOLUMA was the first filler approved by the FDA specifically to address age-related volume loss in the cheeks. Lip enhancement's popularity has increased significantly in recent years, but Dr. Bruce says VOLBELLA's effectiveness at reducing the appearance of wrinkles around the mouth -- sometimes called "smile lines" -- is just as desirable among the cosmetic dermatology patients at her Houston and Katy, Texas locations. "Many of our patients are very bothered by the lines that can appear around the lips, known as perioral rhytids," Dr. Bruce says. "The effectiveness of JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA in softening these lines was demonstrated in numerous clinical trials before it received FDA approval." The talented staff of medical practitioners at Suzanne Bruce and Associates (http://www.sba-skincare.com) offers both leading-edge cosmetic dermatology and medical dermatology services in Katy and Houston, Texas. With decades of collective experience, they have refined and expanded their treatments and services since opening their doors in 1997. Each of the dermatologists in the Houston practice is certified by the American Board of Dermatology and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. Dr. Bruce's physician assistant is the first-ever diplomate certified by the Society of Dermatology Physician Assistants, signifying that she has achieved the highest honor available as a dermatology PA. All of these professionals are available to help you achieve healthy and beautiful skin.

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