American Academy of Dermatology

Schaumburg, IL, United States

American Academy of Dermatology

Schaumburg, IL, United States
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Researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found patients with hyperpigmentation, a medical disorder that leads to darkening or increase in the natural color of the skin, are more likely to use sunscreen but do not use other protection measures. Sun protection is recommended for maintaining healthy skin and preventing skin cancer, but for patients with hyperpigmentation it is also essential to their treatment. There have been many studies on the general populations' sun-protective behaviors, but until now there has been little research into how hyperpigmentation patients are shielding themselves from the sun. The survey looked at 404 adults who had a diagnosis of cutaneous hyperpigmentation. The majority of the patients reported using sunscreen, a number significantly higher than the general public. Women were more likely to wear sunscreen, as were white and Hispanic patients, which is consistent with other studies. Patient's answers were also significantly affected by their particular diagnosis. Those with melasma, which causes brown patches on the face, were more likely to wear sunscreen than those with other disorders. While researchers found hyperpigmentation led to an increased use of sunscreen among patients, few reported taking other sun protection measures or reapplying sunscreen every two hours. Nearly half of the sunscreen users didn't know if their sunscreen provided broad spectrum protection. "It is important for providers to educate patients on the many ways to keep their skin safe in the sun," said Neelam Vashi, MD, Director of the Center for Ethnic Skin at Boston University and Boston Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Dermatology at BUSM, who led the study. "It's encouraging that so many patients are utilizing sunscreen, but we can still improve the practice of safe sun behaviors by improving counseling early in patients' diagnosis, recommending sunscreen use for all ethnicities, and providing a wide range of methods to decrease sun exposure." The study was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology and was funded by the Boston University Department of Dermatology.


KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fair & Fashionable is kicking off May Skin Cancer Awareness Month by awarding its “Best Sun Protection” seal to Sol La La, a women’s sun-safe fashion brand. Fair & Fashionable’s goal is to show that real style means celebrating natural skin tones. The organization’s seal recognizes products that offer effective and fashionable sun protection. According to the American Academy of Dermatology: Drs. Molly Menser and Brian Matthys started Fair & Fashionable out of concern for the increase in skin cancer cases among their female patients. Fair & Fashionable uses fashion as a way to encourage daily sun protection and tanning avoidance. Sol La La offers chic and sunsmart apparel for women seeking sun protection without compromising style. The fashion line and exclusive UPF fabric, SansolTM, are made-in-America from eco-friendly cotton and beechwood fibers resulting in ultra soft, lightweight and breathable fabric that blocks 97% of harmful UV rays. “Sol La La is thrilled to receive the Fair & Fashionable ‘Best Sun Protection’ seal to kick off Skin Cancer Awareness Month,” said Abby Auerbach, creator and CEO, Sol La La. “We’re committed to women’s fashion sense while protecting them from harmful UV rays. Sol La La styles add sun protection to Sol Sisters’ favorite outfits without having to reapply. Like sunglasses, simply slip on a Sol La La accessory and ‘step into the sun.’ We support Fair & Fashionable’s mission wholeheartedly!” “Sol La La meets our strict scientific requirements to protect from UVA and UVB rays - during May Skin Cancer Awareness Month and every day,” said Dr. Molly Menser, president and co-founder, Fair & Fashionable. “The styles have broad spectrum protection, they’re stylish and comfortable to wear. We applaud Abby’s team for their contributions to the prevention of skin cancer and are delighted to award Sol La La the Fair & Fashionable ‘Best Sun Protection’ seal.”


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AURORA, Colo. (April 18, 2017) - Cannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The new study, published online recently in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, summarizes the current literature on the subject and concludes that pharmaceuticals containing cannabinoids may be effective against eczema, psoriasis, atopic and contact dermatitis. Currently, 28 states allow comprehensive medical cannabis programs with close to 1 in 10 adult cannabis users in the U.S. utilizing the drug for medical reasons. As researchers examine the drug for use in treating nausea, chronic pain and anorexia, more and more dermatologists are looking into its ability to fight a range of skin disease. "Perhaps the most promising role for cannabinoids is in the treatment of itch," said the study's senior author Dr. Robert Dellavalle, MD, associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He noted that in one study, eight of 21 patients who applied a cannabinoid cream twice a day for three weeks completely eliminated severe itching or pruritus. The drug may have reduced the dry skin that gave rise to the itch. Dellavalle believes the primary driver in these cannabinoid treatments could be their anti-inflammatory properties. In the studies he and his fellow researchers reviewed, they found that THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) the active ingredient in marijuana, reduced swelling and inflammation in mice. At the same time, mice with melanoma saw significant inhibition of tumor growth when injected with THC. "These are topical cannabinoid drugs with little or no psychotropic effect that can be used for skin disease," Dellavalle said. Still, he cautioned that most of these studies are based on laboratory models and large-scale clinical trials have not been performed. That may change as more and more states legalize cannabis. Dellavalle said for those who have used other medications for itch and skin disease without success, trying a cannabinoid is a viable option especially if it has no psychotropic effect. He did not recommend such medications for cancer based on current evidence. "These diseases cause a lot of problems for people and have a direct impact on their quality of life," he said. "The treatments are currently being bought over the internet and we need to educate dermatologists and patients about the potential uses of them." The other authors of the study include Jessica S. Mounessa, BS, Julia A. Siegel, BA and Cory A. Dunnick, MD.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Suzanne Bruce and Associates (http://www.sba-skincare.com) has added the FDA-approved lip augmentation filler JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC to the Houston practice's menu of services, which includes a range of cosmetic and medical dermatology treatments. "We're excited to offer JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA to our patients who want fuller lips while still looking natural," says Dr. Suzanne Bruce, who founded the practice in 1997. "In addition to lip augmentation, VOLBELLA can also soften the fine lines that develop around the lips." JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC, approved last year by the FDA, represents an improvement over other fillers being used for lip augmentation. Like other JUVÉDERM products, VOLBELLA is a hyaluronic acid-based filler, but it's formulated as a softer, smoother gel that can be more easily injected. A press release from Allergan, the maker of JUVÉDERM products, explains that the hyaluronic acid used in VOLBELLA is less concentrated, making it less likely to absorb water. This leads to less swelling and a more natural look. "One of the primary concerns among patients considering lip augmentation is that they'll end up with the dreaded 'fish lips,'" says Dr. Bruce, who serves on the Allergan Medical Aesthetics Advisory Council and is recognized as one of the leading dermatologists in Houston. "My patients want subtle results that still make a noticeable difference. And that's exactly what I can consistently achieve with JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA." What makes JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC unlike any other injectable dermal filler currently on the market in the U.S. is its patented VYCROSS® filler technology. This is the same technology behind the smoother, softer gel that was initially introduced in JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC. VOLUMA was the first filler approved by the FDA specifically to address age-related volume loss in the cheeks. Lip enhancement's popularity has increased significantly in recent years, but Dr. Bruce says VOLBELLA's effectiveness at reducing the appearance of wrinkles around the mouth -- sometimes called "smile lines" -- is just as desirable among the cosmetic dermatology patients at her Houston and Katy, Texas locations. "Many of our patients are very bothered by the lines that can appear around the lips, known as perioral rhytids," Dr. Bruce says. "The effectiveness of JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA in softening these lines was demonstrated in numerous clinical trials before it received FDA approval." The talented staff of medical practitioners at Suzanne Bruce and Associates (http://www.sba-skincare.com) offers both leading-edge cosmetic dermatology and medical dermatology services in Katy and Houston, Texas. With decades of collective experience, they have refined and expanded their treatments and services since opening their doors in 1997. Each of the dermatologists in the Houston practice is certified by the American Board of Dermatology and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. Dr. Bruce's physician assistant is the first-ever diplomate certified by the Society of Dermatology Physician Assistants, signifying that she has achieved the highest honor available as a dermatology PA. All of these professionals are available to help you achieve healthy and beautiful skin.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Michigan board certified dermatologist Dr. David Baird partnered with Digital Limelight Media to create a new website design along with a mobile site for his dermatology practice in Farmington Michigan. Created with the patient in mind, the new site is user-friendly, containing a multitude of information with overviews of services and procedures from acne treatments to Botox injections, reviews and testimonials from verified patients. The extensive skin care resources and detailed website information allow patients to easily find the what they are looking for so they can learn more about the different skin care options available. The new site design came from Dr. Baird’s desire to create a design that reflects his practice’s personality. The new modern design is made up of calming blue tones with pops of red. It also boasts easy navigation options, so patients can easily make their way throughout the site. Visitors to the site will find a multitude of valuable dermatological information, including skin cancer, surgical services and cosmetic services, as well as helpful resources. All of the content is driven by up-to-date dermatologic techniques to make internet searching easy for new patients. The site also features responsive design, which automatically changes the screen size to fit an array of devices. Not only can the site be successfully viewed on desktops, but tablets and mobile phones as well. Patients can view the site to learn more about dermatology procedures and services, as well as learn more about one of Michigan’s leading Dermatologist, Dr. David Baird, MD. Dr. David Baird of Farmington Dermatologists PC is a Michigan native, having grown up in the Detroit area. His journey towards dermatology began at Hope College, where he received his Bachelor of Science in biology and biochemistry. He then went on to medical school at Wayne State University School of Medicine and continued to complete an internship at William Beaumont Hospital, and a dermatology residency at Henry Ford Hospital, where he served as Chief Resident. He also received his board certification from the American Board of Dermatology. Today, Dr. Baird is an active participant in the maintenance of certification program. He is also a member of multiple professional societies, including the American Academy of Dermatology, the Michigan Dermatological Society, the Michigan State Medical Society, and the Oakland County Medical Society. Furthermore, he was also the previous Vice Chair of the Dermatology Foundation. Dr. Baird has hospital staff privileges at Providence Hospital and Detroit Medical Center. For more information, please visit https://farmingtonderm.com


The BLA filing for tildrakizumab with the U.S. FDA is based on two pivotal Phase III trials (reSURFACE 1 and 2) which included over 1,800 patients across more than 200 clinical trial sites, including some patients who have been treated with tildrakizumab for up to three and a half years. Data from these trials were most recently presented at the 2017 American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) Annual Meeting in March and previously presented at the 25th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Congress. Future presentations and publications of the reSURFACE Phase-3 pivotal trials will include more scientific insights on the data to week 52 and beyond. The clinical trials are designed to evaluate safety and efficacy for up to five years, and to date, some clinical trial participants have been treated with tildrakizumab for up to three and half years. About Psoriasis Psoriasis is a chronic immune disease that appears on the skin. It affects an estimated 7.5 million people in the U.S. and approximately 125 million people worldwide1. It is a non-contagious disorder that speeds the growth cycle of skin cells1 and results in thick scaly areas of skin2. The most common form of psoriasis, called plaque psoriasis, appears as red, raised areas of skin covered with flaky white scales, which may be itchy and painful and can crack and bleed2. Despite existing treatment options, many people with plaque psoriasis continue to struggle with the ongoing, persistent nature of this chronic disease. About Tildrakizumab Tildrakizumab is an investigational humanized, anti-IL-23p19 monoclonal antibody designed to selectively block the cytokine IL-23. With this precise targeting, tildrakizumab has the potential to help control the pathogenic cells responsible for the inflammatory process of psoriasis with limited impact on the rest of the immune system. Phase-3 tildrakizumab data provide further evidence for the role of the IL-23 pathway in helping to control the inflammatory process of psoriasis. About Tildrakizumab Phase-3 reSURFACE Trial Design Tildrakizumab Phase-3 studies (reSURFACE 1 and 2) are randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, three-part studies designed to demonstrate efficacy of tildrakizumab in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis compared to placebo and comparative drug and to assess safety and tolerability. Part one of the studies randomized patients into three or four treatment arms, including tildrakizumab 200mg, tildrakizumab 100mg, placebo and etanercept (reSURFACE 2 only). After Week 12 patients on placebo and etanercept were then re-randomized into tildrakizumab 200mg and 100mg treatment arms to proceed into part two of the studies. Finally, in part three of the studies, responders (PASI ≥75) and partial responders (PASI ≥50 and PASI <75) were re-randomized after Week 28 continue the same treatment, a different dose of tildrakizumab or placebo. The co-primary efficacy endpoint of the two placebo controlled studies were the proportion of patients with Psoriasis Area Sensitivity Index 75 (PASI 75) response at week 12 compared to placebo and the proportion of participants with a Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) score of clear or minimal with at least a 2 grade reduction from baseline at week 12 compared to placebo. The reSURFACE 2 also included a key secondary endpoint comparing tildrakizumab and etanercept on PASI 75 and PGA. Other co-secondary endpoint of both placebo controlled studies included PASI 90 and PASI 100 responses at week 12 and PASI 75, 90 and 100 and PGA responses from baseline at Week 28. PGA measures lesion thickness, erythema and scaling across all of a patient's psoriasis lesions in order to determine the disease activity on a six-point scale from "clear" to "severe." A PASI score is a measure of psoriatic plaque redness, scaling and thickness and extent of the involvement in each region of the body. Treatment efficacy is often measured by reduction of PASI from baseline (i.e. 75 percent reduction is known PASI 75), a 90 percent reduction is known as PASI 90 and PASI 100 is total clearance of skin disease. About Sun Dermatology Sun Pharma is committed to expanding our dermatology portfolio to bring healthcare providers and patients around the world more treatment options and ongoing support for conditions with high unmet medical needs like psoriasis. Sun Pharma, along with its subsidiaries, is ranked fourth in dermatology prescription volume within the U.S. per IMS and is fifth largest specialty generic pharmaceutical company globally. In addition to the investigational candidate tildrakizumab, an investigational anti-IL- 23p19 monoclonal antibody, Sun Dermatology is comprised of several branded products indicated for the treatment of acne and actinic keratosis with a focus on other dermatologic conditions with unmet needs such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. For further information, please visit www.sunpharmaderm.com About Sun Pharma, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA, Agreement Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.'s wholly owned subsidiary acquired worldwide rights to tildrakizumab from Merck (through a Merck subsidiary), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, in 2014. Funded by a Sun Pharma subsidiary, Merck is responsible for the completion of Phase- 3 trials in patients with mild-to-moderate plaque psoriasis and, as appropriate, submission of a Biologics License Application to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Merck is also responsible for manufacturing finished goods to support Sun Pharma's initial product launch. Post-approval in the U.S., Sun Pharma will be responsible for all other regulatory activities, including subsequent submissions, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialization of the approved product. Sun Pharma will also be responsible for all regulatory, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialization of approved products for all non-U.S. markets. Merck is eligible to receive milestone payments and royalties on sales of tildrakizumab. The agreement between Sun Pharma and Almirall remains subject to the exclusive license agreement between Sun Pharma and Merck. About Sun Pharma, Almirall S.A, Europe, Agreement Sun Pharma and its wholly owned subsidiary and Almirall (Spanish Stock Exchange ticker: ALM) closed on July 2016 a licensing agreement on the development and commercialization of tildrakizumab for psoriasis in Europe. Under terms of the license agreement, Almirall is able to lead European studies, and participate in larger Global clinical studies for psoriasis indication subject to the terms of the Sun Pharma – Merck agreements, as well as certain cost sharing agreements. Sun Pharma will be eligible to receive development and regulatory milestone payments and, additionally, sales milestone payments and royalties on net sales. Sun Pharma will continue to lead development of tildrakizumab for other indications, where Almirall will have right of first negotiation for certain indications in Europe. The agreement between Sun Pharma and Almirall remains subject to the exclusive license agreement between Sun Pharma and Merck. Disclaimer: Statements in this "Document" describing the Company's objectives, projections, estimates, expectations, plans or predictions or industry conditions or events may be "forward looking statements" within the meaning of applicable securities laws and regulations. Actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those expressed or implied. Sun Pharma is the world's fourth largest specialty generic pharmaceutical company and India's top pharmaceutical company. A vertically integrated business, economies of scale and an extremely skilled team enable us to deliver quality products in a timely manner at affordable prices. It provides high-quality, affordable medicines trusted by customers and patients in over 150 countries across the world. Sun Pharma's global presence is supported by 49 manufacturing facilities spread across 6 continents, R&D centres across the globe and a multi-cultural workforce comprising over 50 nationalities. The consolidated revenues for 12 months ending March 2016 are approximately US$ 4.3 billion, of which US contributes US$ 2.1 billion. In India, the company enjoys leadership across 12 different classes of doctors with 31 brands featuring amongst top 300 pharmaceutical brands in India. Its footprint across emerging markets covers over 100 markets and 6 markets in Western Europe. Its Global Consumer Healthcare business is ranked amongst Top 10 across 4 global markets. Its API business footprint is strengthened through 14 world class API manufacturing facilities across the globe. Sun Pharma fosters excellence through innovation supported by strong R&D capabilities comprising about 2,000 scientists and R&D investments of over 8% of annual revenues. For further information please visit www.sunpharma.com & follow us on Twitter @SunPharma_Live To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sun-pharma-announces-us-fda-filing-acceptance-of-biologics-license-application-bla-for-tildrakizumab-300463108.html


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

It’s no myth that sun protection is essential. It’s also a sobering fact that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. The cold, hard truth is that those ultraviolet rays are damaging. Without taking proper steps to care for your skin year round—and especially during summertime—you could be doing some long-term damage. This Memorial Day, TheBeautyPlace.com is focused on helping you care for your skin with some helpful tips and product choices that exceed the standards of the Federal Drug Administration. Is Makeup with SPF Enough? In a word: no. Sure, it’s helpful to wear SPF-loaded foundation and it’s certainly better than nothing, but your complexion requires a separate sunscreen that will effectively combat those harmful UV rays, like Murad Essential-C Day Moisture SPF 30, a broad-spectrum hydrator that blocks UVA and UVB rays while replenishing skin. What about SPF 15 Products? You may have heard that a popular drugstore recently pulled all SPF 15 products from its shelves. While there’s nothing inherently wrong with lower-level products, your skin gets greater benefit from a product with higher potency. One of the most effective is Dermalogica Solar Defense Booster SPF 50—it’s enriched with green tea and powerful antioxidants, and it’s suitable for all skin types. Why Do I Still Get Burned? If you wear sunscreen but still notice that your skin burns, it’s likely that you aren’t applying the proper amount. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, that’s about an ounce, or one palm full of product. If you wear a high-potency SPF product and only apply a small amount, you’re reducing its strength—and increasing the odds that you’ll burn. How Do I Cope with a Burn? You’ve got ruddy skin after spending a little too much time at the beach with not enough sunscreen. Instead of holing yourself up in the house for the day, grab a tube of Dermalogica Redness Relief Primer SPF 20. It’s designed to minimize redness while protecting your skin from further damage. It also doubles as a primer, so if you want to wear makeup on top you’ll notice it lasts much longer. The key during summer is to select double-whammy products like these—skin protection is critical. Do I Need to Wear Sunscreen on a Plane? It’s a surprisingly common summer travel question—or one that’s often overlooked. In short, yes. It’s important to wear sunscreen whenever you leave the house, but especially if you have a window seat on a plane. Let’s say you’ve got that window propped up for a cross-country flight. The window isn’t designed to filter out harmful UV rays, and the higher altitude also means you’re exposed to stronger rays. The answer? Wear a product like Elta MD UV Daily Broad-Spectrum SPF 40 to protect your skin. It’s sized just right for tossing into your TSA-approved toiletry bag, too. TheBeautyPlace.com is a premier online retailer featuring professional beauty products and tools from the industry’s leading cosmetic, hair, and skin care brands. Find the world’s top brands at discounted prices. TheBeautyPlace.com strives to offer current and prospective clients excellent customer service and make available the most coveted beauty products in the industry. Follow TheBeautyPlace.com on social media: On Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/TheBeautyPlacecom/125435188536 On Twitter: @TheBeautyPlace On Instagram: @TheBeautyPlace On Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/thebeautyplace


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: phys.org

Was she ever right about that price – but it was a lot higher than any of us at the time recognized. What sun addicts didn't know then was that we were setting our skin up for damage to its structural proteins and DNA. Hello, wrinkles, liver spots and cancers. No matter where your complexion falls on the Fitzpatrick Skin Type scale, ultraviolet radiation (UV) from the sun or tanning beds will damage your skin. Today, recognition of the risks posed by UV rays has motivated scientists, myself included, to study what's going on in our cells when they're in the sun – and devise modern ways to ward off that damage. What happens when sun hits skin Sunlight is composed of packets of energy called photons. The visible colors we can see by eye are relatively harmless to our skin; it's the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light photons that can cause skin damage. UV light can be broken down into two categories: UVA (in the wavelength range 320-400 nanometers) and UVB (in the wavelength range 280–320 nm). Our skin contains molecules that are perfectly structured to absorb the energy of UVA and UVB photons. This puts the molecule into an energetically excited state. And as the saying goes, what goes up must come down. In order to release their acquired energy, these molecules undergo chemical reactions – and in the skin that means there are biological consequences. Interestingly, some of these effects used to be considered helpful adaptations – though we now recognize them as forms of damage. Tanning is due to the production of extra melanin pigment induced by UVA rays. Exposure to the sun also turns on the skin's natural antioxidant network, which deactivates highly destructive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals; if left unchecked, these can cause cellular damage and oxidative stress within the skin. We also know that UVA light penetrates deeper into the skin than UVB, destroying a structural protein called collagen. As collagen degrades, our skin loses its elasticity and smoothness, leading to wrinkles. UVA is responsible for many of the visible signs of aging, while UVB light is considered the primary source of sunburn. Think "A" for aging and "B" for burning. DNA itself can absorb both UVA and UVB rays, causing mutations which, if unrepaired, can lead to non-melanoma (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma) or melanoma skin cancers. Other skin molecules pass absorbed UV energy on to those highly reactive ROS and free radicals. The resulting oxidative stress can overload the skin's built-in antioxidant network and cause cellular damage. ROS can react with DNA, forming mutations, and with collagen, leading to wrinkles. They can also interrupt cell signaling pathways and gene expression. The end result of all of these photoreactions is photodamage that accumulates over the course of a lifetime from repeated exposure. And – this cannot be emphasized enough – this applies to all skin types, from Type I (like Nicole Kidman) to Type VI (like Jennifer Hudson). Regardless of how much melanin we have in our skin, we can develop UV-induced skin cancers and we will all eventually see the signs of photo-induced aging in the mirror. Filtering photons before the damage is done The good news, of course, is that the risk of skin cancer and the visible signs of aging can be minimized by preventing overexposure to UV radiation. When you can't avoid the sun altogether, today's sunscreens have got your back (and all the rest of your skin too). Sunscreens employ UV filters: molecules specifically designed to help reduce the amount of UV rays that reach through the skin surface. A film of these molecules forms a protective barrier either absorbing (chemical filters) or reflecting (physical blockers) UV photons before they can be absorbed by our DNA and other reactive molecules deeper in the skin. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates sunscreens as drugs. Because we were historically most concerned with protecting against sunburn, 14 molecules that block sunburn-inducing UVB rays are approved for use. That we have just two UVA-blocking molecules available in the United States – avobenzone, a chemical filter; and zinc oxide, a physical blocker – is a testament to our more recent understanding that UVA causes trouble, not just tans. The FDA also has enacted strict labeling requirements – most obviously about SPF (sun protection factor). On labels since 1971, SPF represents the relative time it takes for an individual to get sunburned by UVB radiation. For example, if it takes 10 minutes typically to burn, then, if used correctly, an SPF 30 sunscreen should provide 30 times that – 300 minutes of protection before sunburn. "Used correctly" is the key phrase. Research shows that it takes about one ounce, or basically a shot glass-sized amount of sunscreen, to cover the exposed areas of the average adult body, and a nickel-sized amount for the face and neck (more or less, depending on your body size). The majority of people apply between a quarter to a half of the recommended amounts, placing their skin at risk for sunburn and photodamage. In addition, sunscreen efficacy decreases in the water or with sweating. To help consumers, FDA now requires sunscreens labeled "water-resistant" or "very water-resistant" to last up to 40 minutes or 80 minutes, respectively, in the water, and the American Academy of Dermatology and other medical professional groups recommend reapplication immediately after any water sports. The general rule of thumb is to reapply about every two hours and certainly after water sports or sweating. To get high SPF values, multiple UVB UV filters are combined into a formulation based upon safety standards set by the FDA. However, the SPF doesn't account for UVA protection. For a sunscreen to make a claim as having UVA and UVB protection and be labeled "Broad Spectrum," it must pass FDA's Broad Spectrum Test, where the sunscreen is hit with a large does of UVB and UVA light before its effectiveness is tested. This pre-irradiation step was established in FDA's 2012 sunscreen labeling rules and acknowledges something significant about UV-filters: some can be photolabile, meaning they can degrade under UV irradiation. The most famous example may be PABA. This UVB-absorbing molecule is rarely used in sunscreens today because it forms photoproducts that elicit an allergic reaction in some people. But the Broad Spectrum Test really came into effect only once the UVA-absorbing molecule avobenzone came onto the market. Avobenzone can interact with octinoxate, a strong and widely used UVB absorber, in a way that makes avobenzone less effective against UVA photons. The UVB filter octocrylene, on the other hand, helps stabilize avobenzone so it lasts longer in its UVA-absorbing form. Additionally, you may notice on some sunscreen labels the molecule ethylhexyl methoxycrylene. It helps stabilize avobenzone even in the presence of octinoxate, and provides us with longer-lasting protection against UVA rays. Next up in sunscreen innovation is the broadening of their mission. Because even the highest SPF sunscreens don't block 100 percent of UV rays, the addition of antioxidants can supply a second line of protection when the skin's natural antioxidant defenses are overloaded. Some antioxidant ingredients my colleagues and I have worked with include tocopheral acetate (Vitamin E), sodium ascorbyl phosophate (Vitamin C), and DESM. And sunscreen researchers are beginning to investigate if the absorption of other colors of light, like infrared, by skin molecules has a role to play in photodamage. As research continues, one thing we know for certain is that protecting our DNA from UV damage, for people of every color, is synonymous with preventing skin cancers. The Skin Cancer Foundation, American Cancer Society and the American Academy of Dermatology all stress that research shows regular use of an SPF 15 or higher sunscreen prevents sunburn and reduces the risk of non-melanoma cancers by 40 percent and melanoma by 50 percent. We can still enjoy being in the sun. Unlike my Aunt Muriel and us kids in the 1980s, we just need to use the resources available to us, from long sleeves to shade to sunscreens, in order to protect the molecules in our skin, especially our DNA, from UV damage.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Sidney Brown thought the mole on his nose was just an annoying pimple. He didn't consider that it could be a cancerous tumor, because, Brown thought, "skin cancer is something white people get." The misconception that people with more pigment -- called melanin -- in their skin cells are protected from cancer-causing ultra-violet rays nearly cost Brown his life. Brown's mole turned out to be a melanoma, the least common form of skin cancer, but also the deadliest. While most people associate skin cancer with sun exposure, melanomas are more likely to be caused by genetics than the sun's ultraviolet radiation, and far more likely to develop on sun-protected areas of the body in blacks, Hispanics and Asians. May is Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month, the occasion for numerous messages about the importance of limiting time in the sun and using sunscreen. While those protective actions are important, they can mislead people into making the same dangerous mistake Brown made. "The misconception that the sun is responsible for all cases of melanoma leads to lower survival rates because of delayed diagnosis, particularly among people of color," explains Arthur Rhodes, MD, MPH director of the Rush Melanoma Surveillance Clinic. Rhodes estimates that only ten to 15 percent of melanomas are caused by excessive sun exposure, typically in heavily freckled and sun-damaged skin. 'Anyone - regardless of skin color - may develop melanoma' Brown, who is black and a father of two, wasn't worried about the mole on his nose until it began to change. "It started out flat. I didn't really pay much attention to it, because I had an oily face and pimples on my nose anyway," he says."So when I saw the black mark, I didn't think much about it. But then it kept irritating me, itching. Then it grew into a lump." His primary care doctor referred him to Rhodes, who quickly diagnosed the mole as cancerous. "He explained that once a mole starts growing up, it is also spreading cancer cells down through the body. That can be too late for many, but catching mine in time saved my life." Brown recalls. A 2016 American Academy of Dermatology study, "Racial Disparities in Melanoma Survival," showed that while melanoma incidence is higher in whites, death rates are relatively higher among people of color. "Far too often, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with melanoma cancer tell us they believed that melanoma was only a danger for sun-seeking whites," the researchers write in their report of the study findings. "But anyone - regardless of skin color - may develop melanoma, in both sun-exposed and sun-protected sites. Not noticing or ignoring a new or changing mole in a sun-protected site can be fatal." Melanomas develop from skin cells called melanocytes, which reside in the superficial layer of the skin called the epidermis. Melanocytes in the epidermis produce pigment (melanin) that gives the skin its color and protects skin cells from the damaging effects of the sun's ultraviolet radiation. Abnormal varieties of melanocytes cause common skin growths known as moles. Most moles are harmless, but unique varieties of atypical moles may develop into melanoma. While less common than other types of skin cancer, melanomas are deadlier, because the malignant cells can spread even though the tumor is relatively small and not bleeding or causing pain or itching. This capacity to metastasize underlies the importance of early detection, especially among people of color. Rhodes stresses the need for monthly self-examination and examination in difficult-to-see areas on the body in family members, seeking the presence of a new mole, or a change in a pre-existing mole - a change in size, shape or color. Some of the most aggressive forms of melanoma may occur on areas that receive little or no direct sunlight. A delayed diagnosis is common for melanomas in these difficult-to-self-examine sites. "Early diagnosis results in a cure, while delayed diagnosis may be deadly," Rhodes warns. "Half of all melanomas in non-whites occur on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, nailbeds, mucous membranes, perianal area, genitalia, and other areas that are not exposed to the sun, areas that are difficult-to-self-examine and commonly ignored." Melanoma in a relatively hidden site will tend to thicken without symptoms or signs, leading to a delayed diagnosis that may result in a higher melanoma death rate, especially for people of color, including blacks, Hispanics, and Asians. Since Rhodes removed his cancerous melanoma ten years ago, Brown has been counseling friends and family to pay closer attention to their skin. "Dark-skinned people think it's nothing," Brown says. "A lot of times we get moles, and we don't think anything about it. Don't accept that it can't be something; go see what it is. Don't say 'Eh, (melanoma is) something that white people get.'" According to the Rush Department of Dermatology, a variety of physical, historical, and genetic traits increase the risk for developing melanoma, including the following:


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Deborah H. Atkin, MD of Dermatology & Laser of Del Mar discusses how ThermiRF® and its trio of applications can rejuvenate the face, body, and feminine anatomy with minimal downtime DEL MAR, CA--(Marketwired - May 10, 2017) - Injectable radiofrequency energy is an innovative new technology that can rejuvenate skin and tighten muscles, explains Del Mar dermatologist Deborah H. Atkin. She says many individuals are bothered by common signs of aging like skin laxity, but they may also wish to avoid surgical procedures to correct them. One solution Dr. Atkin offers is ThermiRF®, a multi-modality non-surgical skin tightening treatment that can enhance the appearance of the face, body, and feminine anatomy with minimal downtime. ThermiRF® is a state-of-the-art body contouring platform with a selection of advanced applications designed for cosmetic enhancement. Dr. Atkin says she uses three of the most popular at her San Diego-based skincare practice: ThermiTight®, ThermiSmooth® Face, and ThermiVa®. She adds that each modality provides a different benefit and is applied in subtly different ways. ThermiTight® heats the underlying structures of the skin to firm them as well as to stimulate collagen production. This is achieved by placing a special electrode into the skin and delivering the radiofrequency waves directly into the targeted region. Dr. Atkin says that the process is brief and made to be as comfortable as possible for the patient. She adds that ThermiTight® can be used on the neck, arms, knees, abdomen, buttocks, and inner thighs. ThermiSmooth® Face applies the energy to the surface of the skin rather than into the subdermal layer, and Dr. Atkin says this approach is completely non-invasive. Even though the treatment is topical, she indicates the radiofrequency energy can reach into the deeper tissues for a noticeable improvement in many common signs of aging. Dr. Atkin says ThermiSmooth® is typically used on the forehead, cheeks, around the eyes, around the mouth, and on the chin. ThermiVa® is the application used to help restore the youthful look and function of the feminine anatomy. Dr. Atkin explains that a narrow applicator is used to externally and internally firm skin and improve muscle tone, helping improve bladder control, reduce dryness, and increase sexual sensation. She says this technique can also minimize the appearance of prominent labial skin for patients who prefer a non-surgical alternative to Labiaplasty. Dr. Atkin says that patients can usually return to normal activity the same or the next day, depending on the application used and the individual's unique rate of healing. Some ThermiRF® therapies are effective with a single session, while Dr. Atkin adds that others may require a series of treatments. She encourages people interested in learning more about this innovative platform to contact an experienced, board certified dermatologist who has extensive training using this device. She says, "ThermiRF® makes it possible to smooth and tighten from head to toe! We are amazing by the low downtime, comfort, and ease to patients." About Deborah H. Atkin, MD Certified by the American Board of Dermatology, Dr. Deborah Atkin is the founder and medical director of Dermatology & Laser of Del Mar, located in the San Diego area. She earned her undergraduate degree from California State University, Northridge and University of California Santa Barbara, and her medical degree from University of California Los Angeles. Dr. Atkin completed additional training at the University of Arizona and Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. She is an active member of several professional organizations, including the American Academy of Dermatology and the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Dr. Atkin is available for interview upon request. For more information about Dr. Atkin and Dermatology & Laser of Del Mar, please visit dermdelmar.com and facebook.com/dermdelmar. To view the original source of this press release, click here: https://www.dermdelmar.com/news-room/minimally-invasive-thermirf-offers-del-mar-residents-trio-of-benefits

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