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Researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found patients with hyperpigmentation, a medical disorder that leads to darkening or increase in the natural color of the skin, are more likely to use sunscreen but do not use other protection measures. Sun protection is recommended for maintaining healthy skin and preventing skin cancer, but for patients with hyperpigmentation it is also essential to their treatment. There have been many studies on the general populations' sun-protective behaviors, but until now there has been little research into how hyperpigmentation patients are shielding themselves from the sun. The survey looked at 404 adults who had a diagnosis of cutaneous hyperpigmentation. The majority of the patients reported using sunscreen, a number significantly higher than the general public. Women were more likely to wear sunscreen, as were white and Hispanic patients, which is consistent with other studies. Patient's answers were also significantly affected by their particular diagnosis. Those with melasma, which causes brown patches on the face, were more likely to wear sunscreen than those with other disorders. While researchers found hyperpigmentation led to an increased use of sunscreen among patients, few reported taking other sun protection measures or reapplying sunscreen every two hours. Nearly half of the sunscreen users didn't know if their sunscreen provided broad spectrum protection. "It is important for providers to educate patients on the many ways to keep their skin safe in the sun," said Neelam Vashi, MD, Director of the Center for Ethnic Skin at Boston University and Boston Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Dermatology at BUSM, who led the study. "It's encouraging that so many patients are utilizing sunscreen, but we can still improve the practice of safe sun behaviors by improving counseling early in patients' diagnosis, recommending sunscreen use for all ethnicities, and providing a wide range of methods to decrease sun exposure." The study was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology and was funded by the Boston University Department of Dermatology.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AURORA, Colo. (April 18, 2017) - Cannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The new study, published online recently in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, summarizes the current literature on the subject and concludes that pharmaceuticals containing cannabinoids may be effective against eczema, psoriasis, atopic and contact dermatitis. Currently, 28 states allow comprehensive medical cannabis programs with close to 1 in 10 adult cannabis users in the U.S. utilizing the drug for medical reasons. As researchers examine the drug for use in treating nausea, chronic pain and anorexia, more and more dermatologists are looking into its ability to fight a range of skin disease. "Perhaps the most promising role for cannabinoids is in the treatment of itch," said the study's senior author Dr. Robert Dellavalle, MD, associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He noted that in one study, eight of 21 patients who applied a cannabinoid cream twice a day for three weeks completely eliminated severe itching or pruritus. The drug may have reduced the dry skin that gave rise to the itch. Dellavalle believes the primary driver in these cannabinoid treatments could be their anti-inflammatory properties. In the studies he and his fellow researchers reviewed, they found that THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) the active ingredient in marijuana, reduced swelling and inflammation in mice. At the same time, mice with melanoma saw significant inhibition of tumor growth when injected with THC. "These are topical cannabinoid drugs with little or no psychotropic effect that can be used for skin disease," Dellavalle said. Still, he cautioned that most of these studies are based on laboratory models and large-scale clinical trials have not been performed. That may change as more and more states legalize cannabis. Dellavalle said for those who have used other medications for itch and skin disease without success, trying a cannabinoid is a viable option especially if it has no psychotropic effect. He did not recommend such medications for cancer based on current evidence. "These diseases cause a lot of problems for people and have a direct impact on their quality of life," he said. "The treatments are currently being bought over the internet and we need to educate dermatologists and patients about the potential uses of them." The other authors of the study include Jessica S. Mounessa, BS, Julia A. Siegel, BA and Cory A. Dunnick, MD.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Cannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The new study, published online recently in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, summarizes the current literature on the subject and concludes that pharmaceuticals containing cannabinoids may be effective against eczema, psoriasis, atopic and contact dermatitis. Currently, 28 states allow comprehensive medical cannabis programs with close to 1 in 10 adult cannabis users in the U.S. utilizing the drug for medical reasons. As researchers examine the drug for use in treating nausea, chronic pain and anorexia, more and more dermatologists are looking into its ability to fight a range of skin disease. "Perhaps the most promising role for cannabinoids is in the treatment of itch," said the study's senior author Dr. Robert Dellavalle, MD, associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He noted that in one study, eight of 21 patients who applied a cannabinoid cream twice a day for three weeks completely eliminated severe itching or pruritus. The drug may have reduced the dry skin that gave rise to the itch. Dellavalle believes the primary driver in these cannabinoid treatments could be their anti-inflammatory properties. In the studies he and his fellow researchers reviewed, they found that THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) the active ingredient in marijuana, reduced swelling and inflammation in mice. At the same time, mice with melanoma saw significant inhibition of tumor growth when injected with THC. "These are topical cannabinoid drugs with little or no psychotropic effect that can be used for skin disease," Dellavalle said. Still, he cautioned that most of these studies are based on laboratory models and large-scale clinical trials have not been performed. That may change as more and more states legalize cannabis. Dellavalle said for those who have used other medications for itch and skin disease without success, trying a cannabinoid is a viable option especially if it has no psychotropic effect. He did not recommend such medications for cancer based on current evidence. "These diseases cause a lot of problems for people and have a direct impact on their quality of life," he said. "The treatments are currently being bought over the internet and we need to educate dermatologists and patients about the potential uses of them."


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Cannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The new study, published online recently in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, summarizes the current literature on the subject and concludes that pharmaceuticals containing cannabinoids may be effective against eczema, psoriasis, atopic and contact dermatitis. Currently, 28 states allow comprehensive medical cannabis programs with close to 1 in 10 adult cannabis users in the U.S. utilizing the drug for medical reasons. As researchers examine the drug for use in treating nausea, chronic pain and anorexia, more and more dermatologists are looking into its ability to fight a range of skin disease. "Perhaps the most promising role for cannabinoids is in the treatment of itch," said the study's senior author Dr. Robert Dellavalle, MD, associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He noted that in one study, eight of 21 patients who applied a cannabinoid cream twice a day for three weeks completely eliminated severe itching or pruritus. The drug may have reduced the dry skin that gave rise to the itch. Dellavalle believes the primary driver in these cannabinoid treatments could be their anti-inflammatory properties. In the studies he and his fellow researchers reviewed, they found that THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) the active ingredient in marijuana, reduced swelling and inflammation in mice. At the same time, mice with melanoma saw significant inhibition of tumor growth when injected with THC. "These are topical cannabinoid drugs with little or no psychotropic effect that can be used for skin disease," Dellavalle said. Still, he cautioned that most of these studies are based on laboratory models and large-scale clinical trials have not been performed. That may change as more and more states legalize cannabis. Dellavalle said for those who have used other medications for itch and skin disease without success, trying a cannabinoid is a viable option especially if it has no psychotropic effect. He did not recommend such medications for cancer based on current evidence. "These diseases cause a lot of problems for people and have a direct impact on their quality of life," he said. "The treatments are currently being bought over the internet and we need to educate dermatologists and patients about the potential uses of them."


KANSAS CITY, Mo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fair & Fashionable is kicking off May Skin Cancer Awareness Month by awarding its “Best Sun Protection” seal to Sol La La, a women’s sun-safe fashion brand. Fair & Fashionable’s goal is to show that real style means celebrating natural skin tones. The organization’s seal recognizes products that offer effective and fashionable sun protection. According to the American Academy of Dermatology: Drs. Molly Menser and Brian Matthys started Fair & Fashionable out of concern for the increase in skin cancer cases among their female patients. Fair & Fashionable uses fashion as a way to encourage daily sun protection and tanning avoidance. Sol La La offers chic and sunsmart apparel for women seeking sun protection without compromising style. The fashion line and exclusive UPF fabric, SansolTM, are made-in-America from eco-friendly cotton and beechwood fibers resulting in ultra soft, lightweight and breathable fabric that blocks 97% of harmful UV rays. “Sol La La is thrilled to receive the Fair & Fashionable ‘Best Sun Protection’ seal to kick off Skin Cancer Awareness Month,” said Abby Auerbach, creator and CEO, Sol La La. “We’re committed to women’s fashion sense while protecting them from harmful UV rays. Sol La La styles add sun protection to Sol Sisters’ favorite outfits without having to reapply. Like sunglasses, simply slip on a Sol La La accessory and ‘step into the sun.’ We support Fair & Fashionable’s mission wholeheartedly!” “Sol La La meets our strict scientific requirements to protect from UVA and UVB rays - during May Skin Cancer Awareness Month and every day,” said Dr. Molly Menser, president and co-founder, Fair & Fashionable. “The styles have broad spectrum protection, they’re stylish and comfortable to wear. We applaud Abby’s team for their contributions to the prevention of skin cancer and are delighted to award Sol La La the Fair & Fashionable ‘Best Sun Protection’ seal.”


(PR NewsChannel) / May 5, 2017 / San Francisco, California Lucia R. Tuffanelli, MD, FAAD, Dermatologist currently serving patients within her practice, Epstein & Tuffanelli MDs Inc. and affiliated with St. Francis Hospital and California Pacific Medical Center, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in San Francisco, California. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Lucia R. Tuffanelli’s career in medicine began in 1982 when she graduated from the Medical College of Wisconsin. Upon receiving her medical degree, she completed an internal medicine internship and residency at Martinez Veterans Hospital, before undertaking an additional residency in dermatology at the State University of New York, Brooklyn Health and Science Center. To stay current in her field, Dr. Tuffanelli maintains professional memberships with the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Dermatology, the California Medical Society, the Women’s Dermatological Society, the Pacific Dermatology Association, the Wilderness Medicine Society, and the San Francisco Medical Society, where she has served on the Committee for Physician Well Being since 2000. Dr. Tuffanelli is certified by the American Board of Dermatology, and she treats a wide range of conditions relating to the skin for patients of all ages. Conditions treated by her include eczema, boils, dermatitis, hives, rosea, varicose veins, parapsoriasis, and folliculitis, as well as injuries caused by burns including sunburn. Expert procedures undertaken by Dr. Tuffanelli range from skin tag removal, to cyst incision and drainage, and acne surgery. She is dedicated to treating pediatric and adult medical dermatologic problems and wound care, as well as skin cancer exams and prevention. In addition to her clinical practice, Dr. Tuffanelli serves as Adjuvant Professor at Touro University in Vallejo, California, and volunteers at the University of California, San Francisco. She has also volunteered with, and dedicated her time to the Himalayan Health Exchange – medical expedition. With her wealth of experience and reputation for clinical excellence, Dr. Tuffanelli is a dermatologist in high demand, and yet she still finds time to help and advise less experienced colleagues when needed. Her dedication, expertise and commitment to her specialty and patients makes Dr. Lucia R. Tuffanelli a very worthy winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. About Top Doctor Awards Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Suzanne Bruce and Associates (http://www.sba-skincare.com) has added the FDA-approved lip augmentation filler JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC to the Houston practice's menu of services, which includes a range of cosmetic and medical dermatology treatments. "We're excited to offer JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA to our patients who want fuller lips while still looking natural," says Dr. Suzanne Bruce, who founded the practice in 1997. "In addition to lip augmentation, VOLBELLA can also soften the fine lines that develop around the lips." JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC, approved last year by the FDA, represents an improvement over other fillers being used for lip augmentation. Like other JUVÉDERM products, VOLBELLA is a hyaluronic acid-based filler, but it's formulated as a softer, smoother gel that can be more easily injected. A press release from Allergan, the maker of JUVÉDERM products, explains that the hyaluronic acid used in VOLBELLA is less concentrated, making it less likely to absorb water. This leads to less swelling and a more natural look. "One of the primary concerns among patients considering lip augmentation is that they'll end up with the dreaded 'fish lips,'" says Dr. Bruce, who serves on the Allergan Medical Aesthetics Advisory Council and is recognized as one of the leading dermatologists in Houston. "My patients want subtle results that still make a noticeable difference. And that's exactly what I can consistently achieve with JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA." What makes JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA XC unlike any other injectable dermal filler currently on the market in the U.S. is its patented VYCROSS® filler technology. This is the same technology behind the smoother, softer gel that was initially introduced in JUVÉDERM VOLUMA® XC. VOLUMA was the first filler approved by the FDA specifically to address age-related volume loss in the cheeks. Lip enhancement's popularity has increased significantly in recent years, but Dr. Bruce says VOLBELLA's effectiveness at reducing the appearance of wrinkles around the mouth -- sometimes called "smile lines" -- is just as desirable among the cosmetic dermatology patients at her Houston and Katy, Texas locations. "Many of our patients are very bothered by the lines that can appear around the lips, known as perioral rhytids," Dr. Bruce says. "The effectiveness of JUVÉDERM VOLBELLA in softening these lines was demonstrated in numerous clinical trials before it received FDA approval." The talented staff of medical practitioners at Suzanne Bruce and Associates (http://www.sba-skincare.com) offers both leading-edge cosmetic dermatology and medical dermatology services in Katy and Houston, Texas. With decades of collective experience, they have refined and expanded their treatments and services since opening their doors in 1997. Each of the dermatologists in the Houston practice is certified by the American Board of Dermatology and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. Dr. Bruce's physician assistant is the first-ever diplomate certified by the Society of Dermatology Physician Assistants, signifying that she has achieved the highest honor available as a dermatology PA. All of these professionals are available to help you achieve healthy and beautiful skin.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SCHAUMBURG, IL--(Marketwired - Apr 11, 2017) - Although warm, spring weather means more time outdoors, it also means more bugs -- like bees, ticks and mosquitoes. The best way to deal with pesky bites and stings, say dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, is to prevent them in the first place. This can also help you avoid an insect-related disease, which can put a damper on anyone's spring. "Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme disease and malaria," said board-certified dermatologist Lindsay Strowd, MD, FAAD, an assistant professor of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. "Particularly if you're visiting areas with known insect-borne diseases, it's important to take steps to reduce your risk." To help prevent bug bites, Dr. Strowd recommends the following tips: 1. Use insect repellent. To protect against mosquitoes, ticks and other bugs, use insect repellent that contains 20 to 30 percent DEET on exposed skin and clothing. Always follow the instructions on the repellent and reapply as directed. If you are also wearing sunscreen, apply your sunscreen first, let it dry, and then apply the insect repellent. Do not use sunscreen that contains insect repellent, as sunscreen must be applied liberally and often while insect repellant should be applied sparingly. 2. Wear appropriate clothing. If you know you're going to be out at night or hiking in a densely wooded area, dress appropriately to prevent bug bites. Cover exposed skin as much as possible by wearing long-sleeved shirts, pants, socks and closed shoes instead of sandals. For additional protection, pull your socks up over your pants and tuck your shirt into your pants. You can also pretreat outer layers of clothing with insect repellent containing the active ingredient permethrin. Follow the directions carefully and allow the clothes to dry for at least two hours before wearing them. 3. Use bed nets. If sleeping in the great outdoors, use bed nets to protect against mosquitoes. Look for one that has been pretreated with pyrethroid insecticide. If it doesn't reach the floor, tuck it under the mattress for maximum protection. 4. Pay attention to outbreaks. Check the CDC Travel Health Notices website and heed travel warnings and recommendations. "Sometimes, despite one's greatest efforts, bug bites still happen," said Dr. Strowd. "Fortunately, most bug bites and stings can be safely treated at home." To treat bug bites and stings, Dr. Strowd recommends the following tips: 1. For painful bites, such as a bee sting, take an over-the-counter painkiller, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Always follow the directions on the label and use the correct dose. 2. For bites that itch, apply an ice pack or an over-the-counter anti-itch cream, such as hydrocortisone. Another option is to take an over-the-counter oral antihistamine. 3. To reduce swelling, apply an ice pack to the bite. "If you experience any serious symptoms after a bug bite, such as a rash, fever or body aches, see your doctor or a board-certified dermatologist immediately," said Dr. Strowd. "Make sure you tell the doctor about your recent bite so that they can examine you for a transmitted disease." These tips are demonstrated in "How to Prevent and Treat Bug Bites," a video posted to the AAD website and YouTube channel. This video is part of the AAD's "Video of the Month" series, which offers tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair and nails. A new video in the series posts to the AAD website and YouTube channel each month. Headquartered in Schaumburg, Ill., the American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of more than 19,000 physicians worldwide, the AAD is committed to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair and nails; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin, hair and nails. For more information, contact the AAD at 1-888-462-DERM (3376) or aad.org. Follow the AAD on Facebook (American Academy of Dermatology), Twitter (@AADskin), or YouTube (AcademyofDermatology). To view a media-rich version of this release, go to: http://aad.new-media-release.com/2017/bug_bites/


Integrated Dermatology Group (IDG), a leading national dermatology practice, has expanded its presence in Virginia by acquiring the practice of Dr. William Shields and partnering with Dr. Jonathan Schreiber, who will serve as Medical Director of the practice known as Integrated Dermatology of Newport News, LLC. Dr. Schreiber first partnered with Integrated Dermatology Group in 2014 with the opening of Integrated Dermatology of Tidewater, LLC in Norfolk, Virginia. He now serves as Medical Director of both practices. After graduating with honors from Stanford University, Dr. Schreiber attended Duke University, where he earned both a medical degree and a Ph.D. in Pharmacology. He then completed his internship at Boston Medical Center and his Dermatology residency at Tufts New England Medical Center and Boston Medical Center’s combined program. Dr. Schreiber is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology and a member and past President of the Tidewater Dermatology Society. “By partnering with or selling to IDG, the dermatologist can focus on providing high-quality patient care while IDG manages the practice infrastructure and back-office operations, ensuring best clinical practices and patient outcomes,” said Jeff Queen, co-CEO of Integrated Dermatology Group. “For dermatologists who want to monetize all their practice's value, IDG has a program giving them the opportunity to do so. These dermatologists continue to practice dermatology and accrue additional income from the practice,” said Andrew Queen, co-CEO of Integrated Dermatology Group. IDG is continuing its systematic national expansion. The Newport News announcement comes on the heels of recent announcements of partnerships in both White Plains (Integrated Dermatology of White Plains, LLC) and Chevy Chase (Integrated Dermatology of Chevy Chase, LLC), Maryland. For more information about one of the nation's largest and fastest-growing dermatology groups, with practices located across the country, please contact Integrated Dermatology Group at www.mydermgroup.com, or call Jeff Queen at 561-314-2000, extension 1038.    About Integrated Dermatology Group Headquartered in Boca Raton, Florida, Integrated Dermatology Group is one of the country’s largest providers of dermatology care. The company has expanded its presence nationally by acquiring and partnering with dermatology practices across the United States. This exclusive model enables selling dermatologists to realize all or part of the value of their practices and gives them the choice of either retiring or remaining at the practice indefinitely, maintaining autonomy and control over the practice of medicine. Simultaneously, IDG presents dermatologists with the unique opportunity to immediately join an established private practice as a partner, not an employee, with the infrastructure, support, and resources the larger group provides. IDG's mission is to improve the quality of practice life for its dermatologists while adding to their financial success. As members of IDG, dermatologists focus on providing high-quality patient care as IDG removes the stress of day-to-day management by implementing best practices in the areas of compliance, financial services, human resources, payers, and more. For additional information, visit www.mydermgroup.com.


— Market Highlights Actinic keratosis (AKs) are among the most frequent diagnosis in dermatological practice. Exponential increase in the incidence of AKs and their potential to evolve to squamous cell carcinoma have made the condition an increasingly important strategic health issue. AKs are the collections of abnormal skin cells known as keratinocytes. They are found in the upper layers of skin that developed after prolonged exposure to sun light and ultraviolet light. They are the strongest predictor of non-melanoma skin cancer in an individual, while some actinic keratoses will develop into an invasive form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). These spots tends to occur on the areas of high sun exposure such as the face, back of hands, ears and lips. They are most common in people who are in their 40s. global actinic keratosis treatment market is expected to grow at a CAGR of ~5% during the period 2016 to 2022 The market for actinic keratosis treatment is growing steadily. This is attributed to the factors such as; increasing incidence of actinic keratosis in different regions. As per Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, in Australia 40% to 60% of adults are affected with actinic keratosis. The reason for high incidence of actinic keratosis in Australian people is that they live in the proximity of the equator and the vast population is fair skinned individuals. However, apart from the factors leading to the growth of this market, there are some restraints hampering the market growth such as lesser awareness in developing nations for actinic keratosis and related treatments. The Hottest Trend in the Market Actinic Keratoses (AK) are pre-cancerous lesions that are developed on sun-exposed areas of skin. They most commonly appear as rough, dry and scaly patches on the skin sometimes hyperkeratotic lesion as a result of prolonged and repeated sun exposure. Actinic keratoses are warning signs that indicate that the skin has been damaged by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and that there may be a higher risk of developing skin cancer. According to American Academy of Dermatology, actinic keratoses is the second leading cause of skin cancer deaths in the US, around 40% of all Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCCs) begin as actinic keratoses and approximately 50% of the world's population suffers from skin problems resulting from AK. There are many treatments available to treat the actinic keratoses such as cryotherapy, curettage with or without electrosurgery, laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, chemical peeling and topical treatments. Out of which cryotherapy is by far the most commonly employed therapeutic modality in the US. Segmentation: On the basis of surgical procedures • hotodynamic therapy, • cryotherapy, • curettage and desiccation, • laser surgery, • combination therapy • others. On the basis of prescription products • fluorouracil cream, • imiquimod cream, • ingenol mebutate gel, • diclofenac gel • others. On the basis of end users • hospitals • clinics • oncology centers • dermatology service centers • others. 1. Introduction 1.1 Definition 1.2 Scope of Study 1.3 Research Objective 1.4 Assumptions & Limitations 1.5 Market Structure: 2 Research Methodology 2.1 Research Process 2.2 Primary Research 2.3 Secondary Research 3 Market Dynamics 3.1 Drivers 3.2 Restraints 3.3 Opportunities 3.4 Challenges 3.5 Macroeconomic Indicators 4 Market Factor Analysis 4.1 Porter’s five forces model 4.1.1 Bargaining Power of suppliers 4.1.2 Bargaining Power of Customer 4.1.3 Intensity of Competitor’s 4.1.4 Threat of New Entrants 5 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, by Surgical Procedure Continue….. List of Tables Table 1 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, 2013-2022 Table 2 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, By Surgical Procedure, 2013-2022 Table 3 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, By Prescription Product, 2013-2022 Table 4 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, By End User, 2013-2022 Continue…… List Of Figures Figure 1 Research Process Figure 2 Porters Five Forces Model Figure 3 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, By Surgical Procedure Figure 4 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, By Prescription Product Figure 5 Global Actinic Keratosis Treatment Market, By End User Continue…… Key questions answered in this report • What will the market size be in 2022 and what will the growth rate be? • What are the key market trends? • What is driving this market? • What are the challenges to market growth? • Who are the key vendors in this market space? • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors? • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? Related Report Chromatography systems Market information, by type (gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, and others), by end users (pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, hospital and research laboratories, agriculture and food industry, and others) - Forecast to 2022..know more about this report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/chromatography-systems-market-2324 About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services. MRFR team have supreme objective to provide the optimum quality market research and intelligence services to our clients. Our market research studies by products, services, technologies, applications, end users, and market players for global, regional, and country level market segments, enable our clients to see more, know more, and do more, which help to answer all their most important questions. For more information, please visit https://www.marketresearchfuture.com

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