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Hradec Králové, Czech Republic

Celakovska J.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Ettlerova K.,Ambulance Klinicke Imunologie A Alergologie | Ettler K.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Vaneckova J.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Bukac J.,Ustav Lekarske Biofyziky LF UK
Cesko-Slovenska Dermatologie | Year: 2010

Aim: The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency of egg proteins allergy in adolescent and adult patients with atopic eczema and its possible role in disease flares. Methods: Group of 179 atopic patients older than 14 years was investigated for the egg allergy (history, skin prick tests, serum specific IgE and atopy patch tests were performed) and its significance was evaluated. In patients with at least one positive test of either yolk or egg white the open exposure test with an egg was performed folloving hypoallergenic elimination diet. The egg allergy was diagnosed in case of positive result of the open exposure test and the evaluation of patient's history. Results: Egg protein allergy was confirmed in 11 patients (6%). Both early reactions (in 2,7% of patients oral allergy syndrome, itching and asthma) and worsening of atopic eczema (in 3,3% of patients) were noticed. Positivity of serum specific IgE and prick tests to egg proteins (in 34% of patients) in great part of them (in 28%) did not correlate with clinical symptoms of allergy. Atopy patch tests revealed egg allergy in 1% of IgE non-reactive patients. After egg eliminaton the skin symptoms improved especially in those with late reaction in open exposure tests. Conclusion: To diagnose food allergy in atopic patients the complete diagnostic process including exposure test after elimination diet is necessary. Source


Celakovska J.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Ettlerova K.,Ambulance Klinicke Imunologie A Alergologie | Ettler K.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Vaneckova J.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Bukac J.,Ustav Lekarske Biofyziky LF UK
Cesko-Slovenska Dermatologie | Year: 2012

Aim: To evaluate the possible influence of the diagnostic hypoallergenic diet on disease intensity and subjective parameters in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Methods: The diagnostic hypoallergenic diet for the period of 3 weeks was recommended to patients with atopic eczema. Severity of eczema was scored according to the SCORAD score and intensity criteria (erythema, oedema, crusting, excoriations, lichenification, dryness) and subjective parameters (pruritus, sleeplessness) were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the diet. Results: 149 patients, including 108 women and 41 men, with the average age of 26.03 (s. d. 9.6 years), range from 14 to 63 years, completed the diet. There was a statistically significant reduction in the severity of sleeplessness and pruritus and a reduction in all of the intensity criteria except for lichenification at the end of this diet. Conclusion: The diagnostic hypoallergenic diet can improve the intensity and subjective parameters of atopic dermatitis evaluated by SCORAD index except for lichenification. We recommend to introduce the diet as a temporarymedical tool in patients suffering frommoderate or severe atopic dermatitis and as well as a diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of food allergy. Source


Celakovska J.,Klinika nemoci koznich a pohlavnich | Ettlerova K.,Ambulance Klinicke Imunologie A Alergologie | Ettler K.,Klinika nemoci koznich a pohlavnich | Vaneckova J.,Ustav lekarske biofyziky | Bukac J.,Ustav lekarske biofyziky
Cesko-Slovenska Dermatologie | Year: 2015

A few reports demonstrate the relationship between IgE sensitization to aeroallergens in atopic dermatitis and other allergic diseases and parameters. The objective of this study is to evaluate, if there is a significant relationship between the sensitization to common aeroallergens in atopic dermatitis patients and the occurrence of asthma bronchiale, rhinitis, and other atopic parameters. Sensitization to dust, mites, animal dander, and bird feather was examined byskin prick test and specific IgE. The relationship of sensitization to these allergens and the occurrence of asthma bronchiale, rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history, and onset of atopic dermatitis was evaluated. We examined 288 patients, 90 men and 198 women. According to our results, IgE sensitisation to animal dander, dust and mites may increase the risk of developing asthma or rhinitis. In patients with sensitization on the feathers of birds occurs significantly more frequently the onset of atopic eczema after the 5th year of life and in these patients no relationship to the positive family history of atopy has been found. © 2015, Czech Medical Association J.E. Purkyne. All rights reserved. Source


Celakovska J.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Ettleroya K.,Ambulance Klinicke Imunologie A Alergologie | Ettler K.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Vaneckova J.,Klinika Nemoci Koznich A Pohlavnich FN A LF UK | Bukac J.,Ustav Lekarske Biofyziky LF UK Hradec Kralove
Cesko-Slovenska Dermatologie | Year: 2010

The soya proteins are considered important food and aeroallergens. The food allergy to soya represents an increasing problem in many countries. Despite this fact, the overall information on soya allergy is rare. Recently, only a few papers on soya allergy have been published. It seems that the patients with bronchial asthma and peanut allergy (with early allergic reactions: oral allergy syndrome or respiratory problems) are at high risk of severe reaction after soya ingestion. The occurrence of early reactions to soya, the sensitivity of diagnostic methods and the relation to pollen and peanut allergy (early reactions) and to asthma bronchiale in patients older than 14 years of age suffering from atopic eczema were evaluated in our study. In all 175 patients the complex dermatological and allergological examination of possible food allergy was performed. The food allergy to soya, most often presented as an oral allergy syndrome, occurred nearly in 3% of patients. Positive specific IgE antibodies (serum specific antibodies, skin prick tests) with no clinical manifestation of soya allergy recorded in 23% of patients were evaluated as probable cross reactions to pollen. The skin prick test proved the best sensitivity (80%), followed by the atopy patch test (40%), the sensitivity of specific IgE was calculated to 20% in our study. Our study confirmed the relation of the severity of soya allergy to the peanut and pollen allergy. Though the interpretation of positive tests for soya allergy should regard signs of atopy. The patients suffering from atopic eczema together with bronchial asthma and severe peanut allergy seem to be at risk of developing severe reaction to soya without having any previous soya allergy. Source


Celakovska J.,Klinika nemoci koznich a pohlavnich FN | Ettlerova K.,Ambulance Klinicke Imunologie A Alergologie | Ettler K.,Klinika nemoci koznich a pohlavnich FN | Vaneckova J.,Klinika nemoci koznich a pohlavnich FN | Bukac J.,Ustav Lekarske Biofyziky LF UK Hradec Kralove
Cesko-Slovenska Dermatologie | Year: 2013

Our aim was the evaluation of food allergy to egg's white and yolk, peanuts, soya, cow's milk and wheat and follow up of patients with confirmed food allergy. The study included 240 patients with atopic dermatitis (70 men, 170 women, average age was 26.4 from the age of 14 to 63 years, with the median SCORAD 31 points at the beginning of the study). Complete dermatological and allergological examination was performed, including specific IgE, atopy patch tests and skin prick tests. In patients with positive results the diagnostic hypoallergenic diet was introduced and challenge test was performed with suspected food. In patients suffering from moderate or severe form of atopic dermatitis the exposure test with cow milk and wheat flour was performed even if laboratory tests were negative. The positivite tests (including challenge tests) were recorded altogether in 143 patients (60%). From them the food allergy was confirmed in 65 patients (27.5%) and the sensitisation was recorded in 78 patients (32.5%). Allergy to peanuts was confirmed in 20%, to egg in 6%, to soya in 3%, to wheat in 2.5% and to milk in 0.8% of patients. The most common symptom was oral allergy syndrome in 17% of patients after ingestion of peanuts. The worsening of atopic dermatitis was recorded in 7% of patients after ingestion of egg, wheat and soya. The course of atopic dermatitis showed a positive trend at 3, 6 and 12 months of follow-up after avoiding the offending allergen. We conclude that the diagnostic work-up of food allergy in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis should comprise not only the laboratory methods, but as well the diagnostic hypoallergenic diet and the challenge test. Source

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