Aliso Viejo, CA, United States
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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.the-scientist.com

With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are...


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A recent survey of over 2,000 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer found that half of those who undergo bilateral mastectomy after genetic testing don't actually have mutations known to confer increased risk of additional cancers, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and four other U.S. medical centers. Instead the women had what are known as variants of uncertain significance, or VUS, that are often eventually found to be harmless. A bilateral mastectomy is a surgical procedure in which both of a woman's breasts are removed after a diagnosis of cancer in one breast. The finding highlights the need for genetic counselors to help both patients and physicians better understand the results of genetic testing intended to determine a woman's risk for cancer recurrence or for developing a separate cancer in her ovaries or unaffected breast. "Our findings suggest a limited understanding among physicians and patients of the meaning of genetic testing results," said Allison Kurian, MD, associate professor of medicine and of health research and policy at Stanford. "Clinical practice guidelines state that variants of uncertain significance should not be considered to confer high cancer risk, and that patients with these variants should be counseled similarly to a patient whose genetic test is normal. However, many of the physicians surveyed in our study stated that they manage these patients in the same way as they do patients with mutations known to increase a woman's risk." Only about half of the surveyed women who received genetic testing ever discussed their test results with a genetic counselor, and between one-quarter and one-half of the surveyed breast cancer surgeons indicated they treat women with VUS no differently than women with known cancer-associated mutations, the researchers found. Furthermore, some women undergo surgery prior to receiving genetic testing or seeing the results. Kurian is the lead author of the study, which will be published online April 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. University of Michigan researchers Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, and Steven Katz, MD, MPH, share senior authorship. The findings come on the heels of a February study by many of the same researchers showing that physicians often fail to recommend genetic testing for breast cancer patients at high risk for mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, which are strongly associated with ovarian and other cancers. In this study, the researchers asked 2,502 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer whether they had received genetic testing, and if so, whether the testing and any discussion of results occurred before or after breast surgery. They found that of the 666 women who had received testing, 59 percent were considered to have a high risk of a dangerous mutation in a cancer-associated gene. About one-quarter of these women had genetic testing only after surgery -- meaning critical decisions were made about their care before information about their mutation status was available. Delays in testing were particularly pronounced in women who lacked private health insurance. The researchers then polled the surgeons who treated the women in the survey. They found that, when compared with doctors who had treated 51 or more newly diagnosed breast cancer patients during the previous year, doctors who had treated fewer than 21 breast cancer patients were: less confident in discussing the results of genetic testing with patients, more likely to order the genetic test without referring women to a genetic counselor, less likely to delay surgery in order to have test results available for surgical decision-making and more likely to manage a patient with variants of uncertain significance in the same way they would manage patients with proven high-risk mutations in cancer-associated genes. "Our findings suggest that we are not maximizing the benefit of genetic testing for our patients with breast cancer because of barriers related to timeliness of testing and lack of expertise necessary to incorporate results into treatment decisions," said Katz, who is a professor of medicine and of health management and policy at the University of Michigan. Although genetic testing has become more common and less costly, it's also become more confusing. The advent of multiplex gene panels that simultaneously test for mutations or variations in many different genes can render results that are difficult to interpret without the help of a trained genetic counselor. Uncertainties as to the meaning of test results may lead less-experienced surgeons to recommend aggressive treatment in the form of bilateral mastectomies, or cause women to opt for what they may feel is the safest option to manage their cancer. Conversely, high-risk women who do carry dangerous mutations need this information to make informed decisions about their health care choices. "The gaps identified in this study are striking," said Jagsi, professor and deputy chair of radiation oncology at the University of Michigan. "It is critical to ensure that patients at high risk for known cancer-associated mutations are fully informed of the potential benefits of genetic testing, and counseled accurately about the meaning of test results." "We're learning that clinicians' knowledge of breast cancer genetics can be highly variable," said Kurian, who is a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute. "It's important for women at high risk of carrying a dangerous mutation to see someone with expertise in cancer genetics when planning their care. Unfortunately, in many cases genetic counselors may not be optimally integrated into the care of newly diagnosed cancer patients, making it difficult to rapidly triage these patients. Our study highlights the urgent need for improved patient access to cancer genetics experts, particularly genetic counselors, and for educating physicians about the appropriate use of genetic testing and interpretation of test results." Researchers from the University of Southern California, Emory University and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center also contributed to the study. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant P01CA163233), the California Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Kurian has received research funding from Invitae, Myriad Genetics, Ambry Genetics, GenDx and Genomic Health. Stanford's departments of Medicine and of Health Research and Policy also supported the work. The Stanford University School of Medicine consistently ranks among the nation's top medical schools, integrating research, medical education, patient care and community service. For more news about the school, please visit http://med. . The medical school is part of Stanford Medicine, which includes Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children's Health. For information about all three, please visit http://med. .


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

DELRAY BEACH, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Progeny Genetics LLC (Progeny), a leading risk modeling pedigree software for clinicians, announced today that Jamie L’Heureux, MS, CGC has been appointed to the role of Chief Executive Officer. For 20 years, Progeny has assisted healthcare providers with patient screening, risk analysis, order processing, clinical review, and letter generation. Ms. L’Heureux brings over 12 years of experience in both research and clinical genetics as a Board Certified genetic counselor. She received her Master’s degree in Medical Genetics from the University of Cincinnati’s Genetic Counseling Training Program and began her career at the University of Iowa as a Research Coordinator for several international research projects. Ms. L’Heureux’s strong background in software development includes implementing new laboratory information management systems and designing patient-facing Family History Questionnaires. For the past three years, Ms. L’Heureux served as Software Product Manager at Progeny, and was integral to development of Progeny’s letter generation feature and integrated risk models. “I am excited to be able to use my past experience as a Progeny user, both in the research and clinical genetic counseling settings, to help build upon the strong foundation that Progeny already has established, and make it even more user-friendly for our healthcare provider customers and their patients,” said Ms. L’Heureux. “We have some exciting improvements coming up that are focused on saving clinicians’ time and simplifying their workflow.” As a prominent member of the Progeny leadership team, Ms. L’Heureux helps guide the future of the company by leveraging her extensive experience as a genetic counselor. In addition, her software development knowledge provides a solid foundation for Ms. L’Heureux to harness the needs of Progeny’s healthcare provider clientele. Progeny’s software is available in over 2,400 unique sites in 80 countries worldwide. Progeny has played a prominent role in advancing science by bringing family history to the forefront of genetic healthcare, with the intention that the information provided to healthcare providers will assist them with early detection and intervention to patients with genetic predispositions. Progeny became a subsidiary of Ambry Genetics (Ambry), a genetic testing company based in Aliso Viejo, California, in April 2015. Progeny’s software helps healthcare providers analyze hereditary family history data so clinicians can effectively identify genetic risk factors in patients and their families. For more information about Progeny’s services and support, visit here. Progeny is a subsidiary of Ambry Genetics, providing customizable family history, pedigree, sample, and genetic data management software solutions to healthcare providers worldwide. Using Progeny’s sophisticated technology, healthcare providers can collect family history from patients, review and edit pedigrees, run integrated risk models, order and review genetic testing, and integrate into the electronic medical record, allowing healthcare providers to embrace personalized healthcare like never before. For more information about Progeny, visit www.progenygenetics.com. Ambry Genetics is both College of American Pathologists (CAP)-accredited and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified. Ambry leads in clinical genetic diagnostics and genetics software solutions, combining both to offer the most comprehensive testing menu in the industry. Ambry has established a reputation for sharing data while safeguarding patient privacy, unparalleled service, and responsibly applying new technologies to the clinical molecular diagnostics market. For more information about Ambry Genetics, visit www.ambrygen.com.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ALISO VIEJO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Ambry Genetics Corporation (Ambry) is calling on psychiatrists, psychologists and behavioral specialists to encourage their patients with autism, along with their family members, to sign up for a new study conducted through Ambry’s data sharing program, AmbryShare. With this program, Ambry is taking a step towards discovering possible associations between genes and autism, so clinicians can provide their patients with targeted treatments and therapies much earlier in life. “What’s unique about AmbryShare’s approach is that we collect genetic information from clinics and families from all over the world to answer questions that can’t be answered with just a handful of patients,” said Brigette Tippin Davis, PhD, Ambry’s Director of Emerging Genetic Medicine. “The great thing about Ambry partnerships is that we are building connections between research institutions and empowering them to develop new approaches to treating patients with autism based on genetic profiles.” So far, dozens of behavioral clinics and other medical offices have contributed to AmbryShare studies by encouraging participation from their patients. Ambry strives to enroll more than 10,000 patients from clinics nationally and internationally. “Genetic testing would allow us to personalize treatment from a genetic profile and optimize it together with our rich behavioral data,” said Dennis Dixon, PhD, Chief Strategy Officer at Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD). “I really value working with Ambry, knowing this data will have an impact on treatment for our patients and then will still be available for other researchers to access to answer additional research questions. As we each put more samples in, it increases the overall likelihood that we’re going to find something that really makes a difference.” One in 64 children in the United States is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which can impact social interaction, communication and behavior. Genetic testing can help identify an underlying cause in up to 40% of autism spectrum disorders. Some genetic causes include chromosome microdeletions/microduplications, fragile X syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and tuberous sclerosis. New gene discovery can allow clinicians to determine their patient’s course of treatment and the gene-disease relationship associated with their individual case of autism. Through the recruitment of a massive cohort, more data will be collected to discover more genes, develop medical management plans and enact preventive strategies. “The scientists need the data to be out there,” said Charles Dunlop, Ambry’s President and Chairman. “We need to know what these diseases are actually doing, what causes them, what gene mutations are associated with them so we can move forward as an industry and move onto the next phase where there is no disease of any kind. A phase where pharmaceutical researchers know exactly what to do, or exactly what problems they’re trying to solve at a minutiae level—that’s when the cures come.” In 2016, Mayo Clinic and University of Utah collaborated with Ambry on a new research study of more than 60,000 patients to help refine breast cancer risk estimates from predisposition genes that are either previously lacking data or have limited data. The study, “Breast cancer risks associated with mutations in cancer predisposition genes identified by clinical genetic testing of 60,000 breast cancer patients” represented the largest genetic study of women with hereditary breast cancer. The large amount of data was able to provide researchers with new information about genes that contributed to breast cancer risk. Ambry wants to provide researchers with the same capabilities for autism. Since 2001, Ambry has been dedicated to scientific research to help empower the scientific community and refine clinician management guidelines so patients may receive tailored medical management. AmbryShare’s initial launch in 2016 provided scientific researchers and clinicians with the largest open, de-identified database of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cohorts with the goal of achieving a greater understanding of human disease. For more information and to enroll in the AmbryShare autism study, visit the AmbryShare portal here. Ambry Genetics is both College of American Pathologists (CAP)-accredited and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified. Ambry leads in clinical genetic diagnostics and genetics software solutions, combining both to offer the most comprehensive testing menu in the industry. Ambry has established a reputation for sharing data while safeguarding patient privacy, unparalleled service, and responsibly applying new technologies to the clinical molecular diagnostics market. For more information about Ambry Genetics, visit www.ambrygen.com. About the Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) CARD treats individuals of all ages who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at treatment centers around the globe. CARD was founded in 1990 by leading autism expert and clinical psychologist Doreen Granpeesheh, PhD, BCBA-D. CARD treats individuals with ASD using the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA), which is empirically proven to be the most effective method for treating individuals with ASD and recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the US Surgeon General. CARD employs a dedicated team of over 3,000 individuals across the nation and internationally. For more information, visit www.centerforautism.com or call (855) 345-2273.


News Article | March 16, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

Fermat proof prize Andrew Wiles has received the 2016 Abel Prize for mathematics for his solution to Fermat’s last theorem, the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters announced on 15 March. The problem had stumped some of the world’s greatest minds for three and a half centuries. Wiles, a number theorist now at the University of Oxford, UK, will receive 6 million kroner (US$700,000) for his 1994 proof showing that there cannot be any positive whole numbers x, y and z such that xn + yn = zn, if n is greater than 2. See go.nature.com/yf1nxj for more. Famous killer whale nears end of life Tilikum, a killer whale (Orcinus orca) at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida, has an incurable lung infection, the theme park’s veterinary team has announced. In February 2010, Tilikum dragged his trainer Dawn Brancheau into the pool and killed her. The whale was also involved in two deaths in the 1990s, and the story of his life in captivity was told in the controversial 2013 documentary film Blackfish. SeaWorld bought Tilikum in 1983; he is thought to be 35 years old. The species’ life expectancy in captivity versus that in the wild is still debated by scientists. AlphaGo victorious The world’s leading Go player, South Korea’s Lee Sedol, lost his final match in Seoul against Google DeepMind’s AlphaGo machine on 15 March. The tightly fought game brought the best-of-five competition to an end with four wins for the computer versus one for the human player. Sedol came back from three consecutive losses to beat the artificial-intelligence system in the fourth match, but ultimately missed out on the US$1-million prize. Go originated more than 2,500 years ago in China and involves placing black and white counters on a board. See page 284 for more. Brexit warning Physicist Stephen Hawking is one of more than 150 scientists, mathematicians, economists and engineers at the University of Cambridge, UK, who warn of a disaster for the nation’s science if Britain exits the European Union (known as Brexit). A referendum to be held on 23 June will ask whether the country should leave the EU. In a 10 March letter to The Times, organized by protein scientist Alan Fersht, the group argues that the free movement of workers between EU countries helps in the recruitment of high-quality researchers to the United Kingdom. The letter’s signatories are all fellows of the Royal Society in London. Zika meeting With the Zika virus still spreading rapidly across the Americas, the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva held an emergency meeting on mosquito control on 14–15 March. The WHO’s Vector Control Advisory Group intends to review evidence to support new and innovative techniques for combating the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, along with dengue and Chikungunya viruses. These techniques include deploying mosquitoes that have been made infertile through genetic modification or irradiation. Infrastructure map The European Commission has published its latest wish list of the research-infrastructure projects that it considers most deserving of continent-wide support. The European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures road map, released on 10 March, details 21 facilities across all scientific areas to help national governments to prioritize how they spend infrastructure money, and to encourage them to share costs and responsibilities. New facilities listed in the 2016 road map include two in environmental sciences and one in health and food sciences, as well as solar and neutrino telescopes and an infrastructure for scientific research into cultural heritage. Minister keeps title German defence minister Ursula von der Leyen, who was accused in September 2015 of plagiarism in her medical dissertation in obstetrics, will not lose the title of doctor or her job. The senate of Hanover Medical School, which awarded the title in 1990, announced on 9 March that its formal investigation revealed that some passages in von der Leyen’s dissertation were copied from original sources. But these were mostly in the introduction, it said, and the main body of research was original and valid. Since 2011, two German federal ministers have lost their titles and government posts to plagiarism charges. Call to save bees The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) says that US regulatory bodies need to do more to protect bee populations. In a report made public on 11 March, the GAO called on the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to work more closely with other agencies to protect bee health. The report says that although the USDA has upped efforts to monitor honeybee colonies managed by beekeepers, it does not coordinate the monitoring of wild, native bees. The report also recommends that the Environmental Protection Agency identifies the mixtures of pesticides most commonly used by farmers. Gene data shared Researchers and the public can now access a database of anonymized genetic information from 10,000 people with hereditary breast or ovarian cancer. The database, called AmbryShare, was launched on 8 March by Ambry Genetics, a genetic-testing company in Aliso Viejo, California — making Ambry the first private company to release its customers’ information for free. The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has an open-access database of more than 60,000 genomes collected from the public, but AmbryShare’s data currently focus on specific diseases. Ambry hopes to release up to 200,000 aggregated genomes per year from people with various conditions. India vaccine fight The medical charity Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is challenging pharmaceutical company Pfizer’s application for a patent in India on pneumonia vaccine PCV13, marketed as Prevenar 13 in India. MSF says that it wants to allow other manufacturers to make the vaccine, and lower its cost. The 11 March challenge asserts that the method that Pfizer is trying to patent is too obvious to deserve a patent under Indian law. Pfizer is reported as saying that the complexity of the vaccine justifies the price. In partnership with the vaccine alliance GAVI, Pfizer has reduced the price of Prevenar since 2013. Mosquito trial A proposed field trial of genetically modified mosquitoes in the Florida Keys poses no threat to human health or the environment, the US Food and Drug Administration has determined. Members of the public have 30 days to submit comments on the draft assessment, which was released on 11 March. The Aedes aegypti mosquitoes developed by Oxitec of Oxford, UK, are engineered to produce short-lived young to temporarily reduce mosquito populations and combat diseases that they carry. The project has received increased attention from the media and politicians amid concerns about the spread of Zika virus. The level of atmospheric carbon dioxide at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii rose by 3.05 parts per million (p.p.m.) in 2015 — the largest annual increase since records began 56 years ago, says the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After correcting for seasonal swings from plant-growth cycles in the Northern Hemisphere, the average CO concentration in 2015 was 400.83 p.p.m. — a 43% rise compared to the CO level of around 280 p.p.m. that existed during the pre-industrial era. 10 Consecutive months in which the global monthly temperature record has been broken. February’s temperature was 1.35 °C above average for the month. A strong El Niño weather system has contributed to the record-breaking run. Source: NOAA 17–18 March Commercializing 3D printing for biological applications is discussed at the second Tissue Engineering, Biofabrication & 3D-Bioprinting in Life Sciences conference in Boston, Massachusetts. go.nature.com/rggrat 21–23 March NASA holds a meeting in Washington DC to develop its technology road maps. go.nature.com/dhmq2e 21–25 March The annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference convenes in The Woodlands, Texas. go.nature.com/qpnoxd


Cancer Diagnostics Market by Methods (Tumor Biomarker Tests, Imaging, Endoscopy, and Biopsy) for Blood Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer (CRC), Lung Cancer, Other: Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Segment, Trends and Forecast, 2014 – 2020 The report covers forecast and analysis for the cancer diagnostics market on a global and regional level. The study provides historic data of 2014 along with a forecast from 2015 to 2020 based revenue (USD Billion). The study includes drivers and restraints for the cancer diagnostics market along with the impact they have on the demand over the forecast period. Additionally, the report includes the study of opportunities available in the cancer diagnostics market on a global level. In order to give the users of this report a comprehensive view on the cancer diagnostics. To understand the competitive landscape in the market, an analysis of Porter’s Five Forces model for the cancer diagnostics market has also been included. The study encompasses a market attractiveness analysis, wherein methods segments and application segments are benchmarked based on their market size, growth rate and general attractiveness. The study provides a decisive view on the cancer diagnostics market by segmenting the market based on methods of diagnostics, applications and regions. All the segments have been analyzed based on present and future trends and the market is estimated from 2014 to 2020. Based on methods the market is segmented into tumor biomarker tests, imaging, endoscopy, and biopsy. Key application market covered under this study includes blood cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC), kidney cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer, and prostate cancer. The regional segmentation includes the current and forecast demand for North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America and Middle East and Africa with its further bifurcation into major countries including U.S. Germany, France, UK, China, Japan, India and Brazil. This segmentation includes demand for cancer diagnostics based on individual applications in all the regions and countries. The report also includes detailed profiles of end players such as Abbott Laboratories, Inc., Ambry Genetics, AstraZeneca plc, bioMeriux SA, Eli Lilly and Company, Genoptix, Inc., GlaxoSmithKline plc, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., and Pfizer, Inc. The detailed description of players includes parameters such as company overview, financial overview, business and recent developments of the company. This report segments the global cancer diagnostics market as follows:


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Inherited pathogenic variants in protein coding genes BARD1 and RAD51D increase a woman's likelihood of developing breast cancer, according to research conducted at Mayo Clinic and presented today at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Pathogenic variants are changes in DNA that have a negative impact on a gene's ability to function properly. "The BARD1 and RAD51D genes, have been included in clinical testing panels to determine breast cancer risk," says Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a geneticist at Mayo Clinic and lead author of the study. "However, the genes were identified as 'breast cancer' genes through very small studies, so there has never been strong evidence indicating that they are important in driving breast cancer risk." Dr. Couch and his colleagues studied data from 65,000 women with breast cancer to obtain risk estimates associated with 21 cancer predisposition genes from testing panels. They found that pathogenic variants in certain genes, such as BARD1 and RAD51D, caused moderately increased risks of breast cancer. These researchers also confirmed the involvement of the ATM, CHEK2 and PALB2 genes in breast cancer. They also found that the RAD50 and MRE11A genes did not increase risks of breast cancer. "Our findings are important, because genes that do not increase risk of breast cancer can now be ignored and potentially removed from clinical testing panels," Dr. Couch says. "I am hopeful this work will lead to much better interpretation of results from clinical, hereditary [and] genetic testing." Dr. Couch's research included data supplied by Ambry Genetics. Dr. Couch has no relevant financial disclosures. As a leading institution funded by the National Cancer Institute, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center conducts basic, clinical and population science research, translating discoveries into improved methods for prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. For information on cancer clinical trials, call the Clinical Trial Referral Office at 1-855-776-0015 (toll-free). Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www. or http://newsnetwork. .


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ALISO VIEJO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Ambry Genetics (Ambry) has created an online portal to enable more patients and families to participate in research through the AmbryShare program. With this simplified portal, Ambry has streamlined the research consent process to make cohort recruitment easier for clinicians at the time of sample collection for clinical testing. Patients now have the flexibility to e-consent from home, or a mobile device during their office visits. An individual can also enroll themselves and submit a sample to the program independently, whether or not their clinician orders a clinical test at Ambry. The new e-consent portal is one more example of the company’s mission to use AmbryShare to remove the red-tape that has been slowing down scientific progress. The data-sharing program is currently focused on the genomics of autism and prostate cancer, and Ambry is actively seeking research partners for those initiatives. “We've created a simple way for patients to participate in crowd-sourced research,” said Brigette Tippin Davis, PhD, Ambry’s Director of Emerging Genetic Medicine. “If your family is impacted by disease, we are empowering you to make a real difference. AmbryShare freely enables researchers worldwide to put your de-identified genomic DNA to work to find treatments, keeping your privacy protected at the same time.” Since March 2016, Ambry has provided researchers with de-identified aggregated data from whole exome sequencing on a large cohort of affected patients with the intention of aiding and accelerating scientific research at no cost to the public. This data will ultimately help clinicians create more tailored treatments through enhanced understanding of human disease. For more information and to enroll in AmbryShare, visit the AmbryShare portal here. Ambry Genetics is both College of American Pathologists (CAP)-accredited and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified. Ambry leads in clinical genetic diagnostics and genetics software solutions, combining both to offer the most comprehensive testing menu in the industry. Ambry has established a reputation for sharing data while safeguarding patient privacy, unparalleled service, and responsibly applying new technologies to the clinical molecular diagnostics market. For more information about Ambry Genetics, visit www.ambrygen.com.


News Article | March 8, 2016
Site: www.nytimes.com

Ambry Genetics is expected to announce on Tuesday that it will put information from 10,000 customers into a publicly available database.


News Article | March 10, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Ambry Genetics, a prominent DNA-testing firm located in Orange County, CA, unveiled a new databank on Tuesday containing the aggregated genetic information of 10,000 patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. The free initiative named AmbryShare is open to the public, but the information is anonymized. It was engineered to help support President Obama’s Precision Medicine program.

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