Alpharma Animal Health

Bridgewater, NJ, United States

Alpharma Animal Health

Bridgewater, NJ, United States

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Lanckriet A.,Ghent University | Timbermont L.,Ghent University | de Gussem M.,Alpharma Animal Health | Marien M.,Alpharma Animal Health | And 4 more authors.
Avian Pathology | Year: 2010

Necrotic enteritis poses an important health risk to broilers. The ionophore anticoccidials lasalocid, salinomycin, maduramicin, narasin and a combination of narasin and nicarbazin were tested in feed for their prophylactic effect on the incidence of necrotic enteritis in a subclinical experimental infection model that uses coccidia as a predisposing factor. In addition, drinking water medication with the antibiotics amoxicillin, tylosin and lincomycin was evaluated as curative treatment in the same experimental model. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of all antibiotics and anticoccidials were determined in vitro against 51 Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broilers. The strains examined appeared uniformly susceptible to lasalocid, maduramicin, narasin, salinomycin, amoxicillin and tylosin, whereas an extended frequency distribution range of MICs for lincomycin was seen, indicating acquired resistance in 36 isolates in the higher range of MICs. Nicarbazin did not inhibit the in vitro growth of the C. perfringens strains even at a concentration of 128 μg/ml. Supplementation of the diet from day 1 onwards with lasalocid, salinomycin, narasin or maduramicin led to a reduction in birds with necrotic enteritis lesions as compared with the non-medicated infected control group. A combination product of narasin and nicarbazin had no significant protective effect. Treatment with amoxicillin, lincomycin and tylosin completely stopped the development of necrotic lesions. © 2010 Houghton Trust Ltd.


Miller R.W.,Alpharma Animal Health | Skinner E.J.,Alpharma Animal Health | Sulakvelidze A.,Alpharma Animal Health | Mathis G.F.,Alpharma Animal Health | Hofacre C.L.,Alpharma Animal Health
Avian diseases | Year: 2010

Several lytic bacteriophages effective at destroying a genetically diverse population of Clostridium perfringens were isolated from the environment, extensively characterized, and used to formulate a multivalent bacteriophage cocktail designated -401." Two in vivo studies were conducted to determine the cocktail's efficacy in controlling necrotic enteritis (NE) caused by C. perfringens. The first study investigated the efficacy of INT-401 and a bacteriophage-derived, toxoid-type vaccine in controlling NE in C. perfringens-challenged broiler chickens. The study was designed as a proof-of-concept battery cage study with birds reared until 28 days old. Compared with the mortality observed with the C. perfringens-challenged but untreated chickens, oral administration of INT-401 significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the mortality of the C. perfringens-challenged birds by 92%. Overall, INT-401 was more effective than the toxoid vaccine in controlling active C. perfringens infection. The second study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the cocktail when administered via oral gavage, feed, or drinking water. The study was conducted in floor pens, with birds reared to 42 days old. INT-401 administered by all three methods significantly (P < 0.05) reduced mortality. Weight gain and feed conversion ratios were significantly better in the C, perfringens-challenged chickens treated with INT-401 than in the C. perfringens-challenged, phage-untreated control birds. The data indicate that delivering INT-401 to broiler chickens via their drinking water or feed may be an effective means for controlling NE caused by C. perfringens and may improve weight gain and feed conversion ratios in birds with clinical or subclinical NE.


PubMed | Alpharma Animal Health
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Avian diseases | Year: 2010

Several lytic bacteriophages effective at destroying a genetically diverse population of Clostridium perfringens were isolated from the environment, extensively characterized, and used to formulate a multivalent bacteriophage cocktail designated -401. Two in vivo studies were conducted to determine the cocktails efficacy in controlling necrotic enteritis (NE) caused by C. perfringens. The first study investigated the efficacy of INT-401 and a bacteriophage-derived, toxoid-type vaccine in controlling NE in C. perfringens-challenged broiler chickens. The study was designed as a proof-of-concept battery cage study with birds reared until 28 days old. Compared with the mortality observed with the C. perfringens-challenged but untreated chickens, oral administration of INT-401 significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the mortality of the C. perfringens-challenged birds by 92%. Overall, INT-401 was more effective than the toxoid vaccine in controlling active C. perfringens infection. The second study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the cocktail when administered via oral gavage, feed, or drinking water. The study was conducted in floor pens, with birds reared to 42 days old. INT-401 administered by all three methods significantly (P < 0.05) reduced mortality. Weight gain and feed conversion ratios were significantly better in the C, perfringens-challenged chickens treated with INT-401 than in the C. perfringens-challenged, phage-untreated control birds. The data indicate that delivering INT-401 to broiler chickens via their drinking water or feed may be an effective means for controlling NE caused by C. perfringens and may improve weight gain and feed conversion ratios in birds with clinical or subclinical NE.

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