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Mallonee D.H.,Alltech Center for Animal Nutrigenomics and Applied Animal Nutrition | Crowdus C.A.,Alltech Center for Animal Nutrigenomics and Applied Animal Nutrition | Barger J.L.,Lifegen Technologies, Llc | Dawson K.A.,Alltech Center for Animal Nutrigenomics and Applied Animal Nutrition | Power R.F.,Alltech Center for Animal Nutrigenomics and Applied Animal Nutrition
Biological Trace Element Research | Year: 2011

Selenium is a trace element that, although toxic in higher concentrations, is essential for human and animal health. In this study, we looked at microarray-based gene expression patterns from liver and gastrocnemius tissues in mice fed either a selenium-deficient diet or diets containing sodium selenite, selenomethionine, or a yeast-derived selenium supplement. A p value cutoff of 0.01 was used to identify a select set of selenium-responsive genes that were consistently differentially expressed across three age groups of mice with both ANOVA and t test analyses. A total of 19 gene transcripts were found to be differentially expressed across the three age groups with at least one selenium-deficient/selenium-supplemented diet comparison. Of those 19 genes, 12 had been previously identified as selenoprotein-encoding genes, and four of the genes, Gpx1, Selh, Sep15, and Sepw1, were differentially expressed in both tissues, all three mouse age groups, and all three diet comparisons. Activities associated with non-selenoproteins encoded by selenium-responsive genes included transport and stress response. The selenophosphate synthetase 2 gene Sephs2 in gastrocnemius tissue and the solute carrier gene Slc48a1 in liver tissue, both up-regulated with selenium-deficient diets compared to all three selenium-supplemented diets, are previously overlooked candidates for dietary selenium marker genes. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source

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