Dunboyne, Ireland
Dunboyne, Ireland

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Corrigan A.,Alltech Biotechnology | De Leeuw M.,GeneCreek | Penaud-Frezet S.,Beckman Coulter | Dimova D.,Beckman Coulter | Murphya R.A.,Alltech Biotechnology
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2015

This study focused on identifying reproducible effects of dietary supplementation with a mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) on the broiler cecal bacterial community structure and function in a commercial production setting. Two separate trials, each with a control and a supplemented group, were carried out in the same commercial location and run concurrently. Approximately 10,000 birds from the same commercial hatchery were mirror imaged into each of four commercial broiler sheds and fed either a control or supplemented diet. Cecal contents were obtained on days 7, 21, and 35 posthatch from 12 randomly caught broilers from each group. Bacterial pyrosequencing was performed on all samples, with approximately 250,000 sequences obtained per treatment per time point. The predominant phyla identified at all three time points in both trials were Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Tenericutes, representing>99% of all sequences. MOS supplementation altered the bacterial community composition from 7 days supplementation through 35 days supplementation. Bacteroidetes appeared to be replacing Firmicutes as a result of supplementation, with the most noticeable effects after 35 days. The effects of supplementation were reproducible across both trials. PICRUSt was used to identify differences between the functional potentials of the bacterial communities as a result of MOS supplementation. Using level 3 KEGG ortholog function predictions, differences between control and supplemented groups were observed, with very strong segregation noted on day 35 posthatch in both trials. This indicated that alterations of bacterial communities as a result of MOS are likely to alter the functional capability of the cecum. © 2015, American Society for Microbiology.


PubMed | Alltech Biotechnology, Beckman Coulter and GeneCreek
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Applied and environmental microbiology | Year: 2015

This study focused on identifying reproducible effects of dietary supplementation with a mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) on the broiler cecal bacterial community structure and function in a commercial production setting. Two separate trials, each with a control and a supplemented group, were carried out in the same commercial location and run concurrently. Approximately 10,000 birds from the same commercial hatchery were mirror imaged into each of four commercial broiler sheds and fed either a control or supplemented diet. Cecal contents were obtained on days 7, 21, and 35 posthatch from 12 randomly caught broilers from each group. Bacterial pyrosequencing was performed on all samples, with approximately 250,000 sequences obtained per treatment per time point. The predominant phyla identified at all three time points in both trials were Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Tenericutes, representing >99% of all sequences. MOS supplementation altered the bacterial community composition from 7 days supplementation through 35 days supplementation. Bacteroidetes appeared to be replacing Firmicutes as a result of supplementation, with the most noticeable effects after 35 days. The effects of supplementation were reproducible across both trials. PICRUSt was used to identify differences between the functional potentials of the bacterial communities as a result of MOS supplementation. Using level 3 KEGG ortholog function predictions, differences between control and supplemented groups were observed, with very strong segregation noted on day 35 posthatch in both trials. This indicated that alterations of bacterial communities as a result of MOS are likely to alter the functional capability of the cecum.


Edwards M.V.,ACE Livestock Consulting Pty. Ltd. | Edwards A.C.,ACE Livestock Consulting Pty. Ltd. | Millard P.,Australian Pork Farms Group | Millard P.,RSPCA Australia Inc | Kocher A.,Alltech Biotechnology
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2014

An 80 day study was conducted to evaluate the growth promoting effects of a unique mannose rich fraction (MRF) derived from yeast cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, relative to copper and tylosin in commercially housed grower and finisher pigs. 1008 male grower pigs (29.7 ± 1.99. kg live weight) were randomly allocated to four treatment groups of 252 pigs. There were 12 replicates for growth rates (21 pigs per pen) and 6 replicates for feed intake and FCR (42 pigs per feeder). The dietary treatments consisted of a control (CON, containing no growth promoting feed additives), copper (COP, containing 200. ppm of copper as copper sulphate in both grower and finisher pigs), MRF (containing 400. ppm and 200. ppm of Actigen™ (Alltech Biotechnology, Nicholasville, KY) in grower and finisher diets respectively), and tylosin (TYL, containing 40. g and 20. g of tylosin in grower and finisher diets respectively). Growth performance and mortality were monitored over the grower (d 0-38) and finisher (d 39-80) periods. Slaughter characteristics (carcass weight and backfat thickness at the P2 position) were recorded at d 80. Mannose rich fraction pigs grew faster (P<0.01) than CON or COP pigs during the grower phase. Mannose rich fraction and TYL pigs also tended to (P=0.08) have better FCR during the grower phase than those on the CON and COP treatments. No significant treatment effects were observed for growth performance during the finisher phase or over the entire study (d 0-80). However, MRF pigs had a significantly higher (P<0.01) dressing percentage and heavier carcass weight than pig on all other treatments. There was no influence of growth promoting feed additives on backfat thickness. Overall, MRF was as effective as tylosin and more effective than copper as a growth promoter in grower pigs. Mannose rich fraction inclusion was able to enhance the yield of saleable pork, and was the most effective growth promoting option tested. © 2014 The Authors.


Edwards M.V.,ACE Livestock Consulting Pty. Ltd. | Edwards A.C.,ACE Livestock Consulting Pty. Ltd. | Millard P.,Australian Pork Farms Group | Kocher A.,Alltech Biotechnology
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2014

An 80 day study was conducted to evaluate the growth promoting effects of a unique mannose rich fraction (MRF) derived from yeast cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, relative to copper and tylosin in commercially housed grower and finisher pigs. 1008 male grower pigs (29.7 ± 1.99 kg live weight) were randomly allocated to four treatment groups of 252 pigs. There were 12 replicates for growth rates (21 pigs per pen) and 6 replicates for feed intake and FCR (42 pigs per feeder). The dietary treatments consisted of a control (CON, containing no growth promoting feed additives), copper (COP, containing 200 ppm of copper as copper sulphate in both grower and finisher pigs), MRF (containing 400 ppm and 200 ppm of Actigen™ (Alltech Biotechnology, Nicholasville, KY) in grower and finisher diets respectively), and tylosin (TYL, containing 40 g and 20 g of tylosin in grower and finisher diets respectively). Growth performance and mortality were monitored over the grower (d 0-38) and finisher (d 39-80) periods. Slaughter characteristics (carcass weight and backfat thickness at the P2 position) were recorded at d 80. Mannose rich fraction pigs grew faster (P<0.01) than CON or COP pigs during the grower phase. Mannose rich fraction and TYL pigs also tended to (P=0.08) have better FCR during the grower phase than those on the CON and COP treatments. No significant treatment effects were observed for growth performance during the finisher phase or over the entire study (d 0-80). However, MRF pigs had a significantly higher (P<0.01) dressing percentage and heavier carcass weight than pig on all other treatments. There was no influence of growth promoting feed additives on backfat thickness. Overall, MRF was as effective as tylosin and more effective than copper as a growth promoter in grower pigs. Mannose rich fraction inclusion was able to enhance the yield of saleable pork, and was the most effective growth promoting option tested. © 2014.


Barger J.L.,Lifegen Technologies, Llc | Kayo T.,Lifegen Technologies, Llc | Pugh T.D.,Lifegen Technologies, Llc | Vann J.A.,Lifegen Technologies, Llc | And 4 more authors.
Genes and Nutrition | Year: 2012

The essential trace mineral selenium is an important determinant of oxidative stress susceptibility, with several studies showing an inverse relationship between selenium intake and cancer. Because different chemical forms of selenium have been reported to have varying bioactivity, there is a need for nutrigenomic studies that can comprehensively assess whether there are divergent effects at the molecular level. We examined the gene expression profiles associated with selenomethionine (SM), sodium selenite (SS), and yeast-derived selenium (YS) in the intestine, gastrocnemius, cerebral cortex, and liver of mice. Weanling mice were fed either a selenium-deficient (SD) diet (<0.01 mg/kg diet) or a diet supplemented with one of three selenium sources (1 mg/kg diet, as either SM, SS or YS) for 100 days. All forms of selenium were equally effective in activating standard measures of selenium status, including tissue selenium levels, expression of genes encoding selenoproteins (Gpx1 and Txnrd2), and increasing GPX1 enzyme activity. However, gene expression profiling revealed that SS and YS were similar (and distinct from SM) in both the expression pattern of individual genes and gene functional categories. Furthermore, only YS significantly reduced the expression of Gadd45b in all four tissues and also reduced GADD45B protein levels in liver. Taken together, these results show that gene expression profiling is a powerful technique capable of elucidating differences in the bioactivity of different forms of selenium. © Springer-Verlag 2011.


Corrigan A.,Alltech Biotechnology | Horgan K.,Alltech Biotechnology | Clipson N.,University College Dublin | Murphy R.A.,Alltech Biotechnology
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2011

This study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with a prebiotic mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) on broiler performance, bacterial community structure, and phylogenetic populations of cecal contents. Bird performance data were collected, and cecal samples were extracted from randomly caught poults from each treatment group every 7 days from hatching to the age of 42 days. Weight gain, feed consumption, and feed efficiency ratios did not differ significantly between groups. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) of the bacterial communities in birds receiving MOS-supplemented diets indicated that dietary supplementation with MOS at either of 2 levels significantly altered the bacterial community structure from that of the control group on all sample days. The phylogenetic identities of bacteria contained within the cecum were determined by constructing a 16S rRNA gene clone library. A total of 594 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences from the cecal contents were analyzed and compared for the three dietary treatments. The dominant bacteria of the cecum belonged to three phyla, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria; of these, Firmicutes were the most dominant in all treatment groups. Statistical analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries showed that the compositions of the clone libraries from broilers receiving MOS-supplemented diets were, in most cases, significantly different from that of the control group. It can be concluded that in this trial MOS supplementation significantly altered the cecal bacterial community structure. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.


Corrigan A.,Alltech Biotechnology | Horgan K.,Alltech Biotechnology | Clipson N.,University College Dublin | Murphy R.A.,Alltech Biotechnology
Microbial Ecology | Year: 2012

The identification of specific bacterial species influenced by mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) supplementation may assist in the formulation of new and improved diets that promote intestinal health and improve bird performance, offering suitable alternatives to antimicrobials in feed for sustainable poultry production. This study has been conducted to evaluate the use of a MOS compound derived from the yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on turkey performance, bacterial community structure and their phylogenetic associations. A 42-day turkey trial was carried out on birds fed control and MOS-supplemented diets. Bird performance data (weight gains, feed consumption and feed efficiency ratios) were collected, and caecal contents were extracted from randomly caught poults on days 28, 35 and 42 posthatch. Bird performance data showed no improvements as a result of dietary supplementation. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) revealed the bacterial community structure to be significantly altered on days 28 and 35 posthatch but not day 42 as a result of dietary supplementation. This technique was coupled with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis to elucidate phylogenetic identities of bacteria. The dominant bacteria of the caecum on all days in both treatment groups were members of phylum Firmicutes, followed by the Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla, respectively. Statistical analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed that the composition of the MOS clone library differed significantly to the control on day 35 posthatch. It can be concluded that MOS alters the bacterial community structure in the turkey caecum. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


PubMed | Alltech Biotechnology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Applied and environmental microbiology | Year: 2011

This study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with a prebiotic mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) on broiler performance, bacterial community structure, and phylogenetic populations of cecal contents. Bird performance data were collected, and cecal samples were extracted from randomly caught poults from each treatment group every 7 days from hatching to the age of 42 days. Weight gain, feed consumption, and feed efficiency ratios did not differ significantly between groups. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) of the bacterial communities in birds receiving MOS-supplemented diets indicated that dietary supplementation with MOS at either of 2 levels significantly altered the bacterial community structure from that of the control group on all sample days. The phylogenetic identities of bacteria contained within the cecum were determined by constructing a 16S rRNA gene clone library. A total of 594 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences from the cecal contents were analyzed and compared for the three dietary treatments. The dominant bacteria of the cecum belonged to three phyla, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria; of these, Firmicutes were the most dominant in all treatment groups. Statistical analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries showed that the compositions of the clone libraries from broilers receiving MOS-supplemented diets were, in most cases, significantly different from that of the control group. It can be concluded that in this trial MOS supplementation significantly altered the cecal bacterial community structure.


PubMed | Alltech Biotechnology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Microbial ecology | Year: 2012

The identification of specific bacterial species influenced by mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) supplementation may assist in the formulation of new and improved diets that promote intestinal health and improve bird performance, offering suitable alternatives to antimicrobials in feed for sustainable poultry production. This study has been conducted to evaluate the use of a MOS compound derived from the yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on turkey performance, bacterial community structure and their phylogenetic associations. A 42-day turkey trial was carried out on birds fed control and MOS-supplemented diets. Bird performance data (weight gains, feed consumption and feed efficiency ratios) were collected, and caecal contents were extracted from randomly caught poults on days 28, 35 and 42 posthatch. Bird performance data showed no improvements as a result of dietary supplementation. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) revealed the bacterial community structure to be significantly altered on days 28 and 35 posthatch but not day 42 as a result of dietary supplementation. This technique was coupled with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis to elucidate phylogenetic identities of bacteria. The dominant bacteria of the caecum on all days in both treatment groups were members of phylum Firmicutes, followed by the Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla, respectively. Statistical analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries showed that the composition of the MOS clone library differed significantly to the control on day 35 posthatch. It can be concluded that MOS alters the bacterial community structure in the turkey caecum.

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