Alltech Bioscience Center

Dunboyne, Ireland

Alltech Bioscience Center

Dunboyne, Ireland
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Penglase S.,National Institute of Nutrition And Seafood Research | Nordgreen A.,National Institute of Nutrition And Seafood Research | van der Meeren T.,Norwegian Institute of Marine Research | Olsvik P.A.,National Institute of Nutrition And Seafood Research | And 5 more authors.
Aquaculture | Year: 2010

Commercially produced Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) larvae are fed rotifers, while in the wild cod larvae feed on copepods. Rotifers contain up to 30-fold less selenium (Se) than copepods, and may contain insufficient Se to meet cod larvae requirements. In this study, rotifers were fed Se-enriched yeast (Se+rotifers) to obtain copepod levels of Se (3mgkg-1 dry weight (DW)), and the effects of feeding the Se+rotifers to cod larvae was investigated and compared to cod larvae fed control rotifers containing 0.7mgSekg-1 DW. No differences were observed in growth or survival between groups at the end of the rotifer-feeding period (29days post hatch (dph)), or in the rate of skeletal deformities at 120dph. Cod larvae fed Se+rotifers had increased whole-body levels of Se, and expression and activity of Se-dependent glutathione peroxidases during the rotifer-feeding period (3 to 29dph) compared to controls. Meanwhile no effect of the treatment was seen in the activity or mRNA expression of the deiodinases. There was no difference in thyroid hormone levels at 29dph, but the T3/T4 ratio was increased in the Se+larvae. Thyroid follicles of Se+larvae had increased total volume, colloid volume and ratios of epithelium to colloid compared to controls. The results demonstrate that Se-dependent enzyme mRNA expression and activities in cod are retained according to a selenoprotein hierarchy as found in other vertebrates, and suggest that rotifers need extra supplementation of Se to meet cod larvae requirements. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Penglase S.,National Institute of Nutrition And Seafood Research | Hamre K.,National Institute of Nutrition And Seafood Research | Sweetman J.W.,Alltech Bioscience Center | Nordgreen A.,National Institute of Nutrition And Seafood Research
Aquaculture | Year: 2011

Rotifers are used as the first feeding diet for the larvae of many commercially produced marine fish species. However, the nutritional requirements of marine fish larvae appear to be better fulfilled by their wild feed, copepods. Consequently, rotifers are fed diets that alter their body composition to better imitate copepod composition and this results in greater success when rearing rotifer fed marine fish larvae. Despite this, copepod fed fish larvae still have higher growth rates and survival than rotifer fed larvae. This may occur because of the less investigated mineral differences that exist between rotifers and copepods. The concentration of selenium (Se) in rotifers Brachionus sp. (0.08-0.09mg Se kg-1 dry weight) can be over 30 fold lower than the concentration found in copepods (3-5mg Se kg-1 dry weight). In this study, the enrichment and retention of Se in rotifers fed Se enriched yeast (Se-yeast) were investigated. Rotifer Se concentration increased linearly with increasing levels of Se-yeast, with rotifers reaching a maximum of 138mg Se kg-1 dry weight. The use of Se-yeast was highly effective, with only 1% of the batch culture or short term enrichment diet needed to be replaced with Se-yeast to achieve copepod Se levels. At this feeding level there were no negative effects on rotifer egg ratio or population growth. Uptake of Se from Se-yeast was over 40 fold higher than obtained from using sodium selenite in short term enrichments (3h). Se-yeast enriched rotifers had a high retention (100-85%) of Se for up to 10h storage in clear water at cold (10°C) or warm (20°C) temperatures, while storage in green water (with algae) resulted in a slightly lower Se retention (65%) in a similar time period (8h). Overall, rotifers enrichment with Se-yeast resulted in reproducible concentrations of Se that were then retained for extended periods of time. This will allow Se-yeast enriched rotifers to be used as a Se delivery method for fish larvae nutritional requirement or toxicological studies. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Gaffney M.,Alltech Bioscience Center | O'Rourke R.,Alltech Bioscience Center | Murphy R.,Alltech Bioscience Center
Algal Research | Year: 2014

Due largely to their unique and diverse metabolic profile, microalgae have embedded themselves in a plethora of commercial applications encompassing nutrition, cosmetics and biofuel production. The present research demonstrates the ability to improve the nutritional properties of Schizochytrium sp. through direct medium supplementation with flaxseed oil. Increasing supplemental concentrations, to a maximum of 1% v/v, reflected a 2.8-fold improvement in dry cell weight, yielding a maximum 17.1 ± 1.3. g/L. Cultures with higher biomass yields also demonstrated increased glucose utilisation, which may have influenced the final fatty acid profiles of each culture. At inclusion levels above 0.05%, total fatty acid amounts reduced in a near linear fashion, potentially in response to a glucose deficient environment. Supplementation of just 0.05% flaxseed oil resulted in the incorporation of exogenous C18 fatty acids into the algal biomass, as well as significantly increasing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) titres to 100.3 ± 4. mg/g algae (p≤. 0.05). At the same inclusion rate, the antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of algal biomass were significantly enhanced, particularly in the methanolic faction (p≤. 0.001). The inclusion of essential linoleic and α-linolenic fatty acids with improved levels of DHA and enhanced antioxidant status demonstrate the suitability of medium supplementation to improve the nutritional value of microalgae. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


O'Rourke R.,Alltech Bioscience Center | Gaffney M.,Alltech Bioscience Center | Murphy R.,Alltech Bioscience Center
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2016

Bioindustrial wastewaters, often characterised by high carbon and nitrogen contents, have shown promise as a valuable resource for the cultivation of beneficial microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to assess if Parachlorella kessleri could utilise brewery wastewater (Br WW) for growth and production of metabolites. P. kessleri was cultivated on different concentrations of Br WW over 14 days. Higher concentrations of Br WW led to an approximate two-fold increase in dry cell weight yielding a maximum of 12.3 g DCW/L. High glucose and nitrogen utilisation was associated with high algal biomass yields, with a 97% reduction in glucose achieved in 50% (v/v) Br WW cultures after 14 days. Assessing the benefits to P. kessleri, increases in oleic and a-linoleic acids were seen in 50 and 10% (v/v) Br WW cultures. Concentration of Br WW did not have an impact on the overall antioxidant activities of microalgal cultures, however, it did affect phenolic levels (2.4-fold increase) in 50% (v/v) Br WW cultures. This research demonstrated that P. kessleri did utilise the carbon and nitrogen content in the Br WW for growth and metabolite production, thereby reducing the nutrient load of the Br WW. © IWA Publishing 2016.


Byrne L.A.,Alltech Bioscience Center | Hynes M.J.,National University of Ireland | Connolly C.D.,Alltech Bioscience Center | Murphy R.A.,Alltech Bioscience Center
Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry | Year: 2011

Copper(II) complexes of di-, tri- and tetra peptides with previously published protonation constants were re-investigated using pH and copper ion selective electrode (ISE) potentiometry in conjunction with a modified version of HYPERQUAD computer program. The purpose was to demonstrate the suitability of the ISE approach for the determination of apparent stability constants for copper(II) complexes with ligands for which proton stability constants were not available. The interactions of Cu 2+ with oligopeptides were also analysed using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-ToF-MS). The results provide an insight into the metal complex species formed, their apparent stabilities under selected conditions and the effect of the relative positions of certain amino acids within the peptide sequence. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Alltech Bioscience Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of inorganic biochemistry | Year: 2011

Copper(II) complexes of di-, tri- and tetra peptides with previously published protonation constants were re-investigated using pH and copper ion selective electrode (ISE) potentiometry in conjunction with a modified version of HYPERQUAD computer program. The purpose was to demonstrate the suitability of the ISE approach for the determination of apparent stability constants for copper(II) complexes with ligands for which proton stability constants were not available. The interactions of Cu(2+) with oligopeptides were also analysed using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-ToF-MS). The results provide an insight into the metal complex species formed, their apparent stabilities under selected conditions and the effect of the relative positions of certain amino acids within the peptide sequence.


PubMed | Alltech Bioscience Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research | Year: 2016

Bioindustrial wastewaters, often characterised by high carbon and nitrogen contents, have shown promise as a valuable resource for the cultivation of beneficial microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to assess if Parachlorella kessleri could utilise brewery wastewater (Br WW) for growth and production of metabolites. P. kessleri was cultivated on different concentrations of Br WW over 14 days. Higher concentrations of Br WW led to an approximate two-fold increase in dry cell weight yielding a maximum of 12.3 g DCW/L. High glucose and nitrogen utilisation was associated with high algal biomass yields, with a 97% reduction in glucose achieved in 50% (v/v) Br WW cultures after 14 days. Assessing the benefits to P. kessleri, increases in oleic and -linoleic acids were seen in 50 and 10% (v/v) Br WW cultures. Concentration of Br WW did not have an impact on the overall antioxidant activities of microalgal cultures, however, it did affect phenolic levels (2.4-fold increase) in 50% (v/v) Br WW cultures. This research demonstrated that P. kessleri did utilise the carbon and nitrogen content in the Br WW for growth and metabolite production, thereby reducing the nutrient load of the Br WW.

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