Seattle, WA, United States
Seattle, WA, United States

Allozyne is a clinical stage biotechnology company headquartered in Seattle’s biotech and high tech innovation corridor. Its lead product AZ01 is a long acting interferon beta for the treatment of the relapsing remitting form of multiple sclerosis, a chronic degenerative disease characterized by demyelination of nerve fibers leading to severe nerve damage and increasing disability. Multiple sclerosis is estimated to affect 400,000 individuals in the US alone and 2.5 million worldwide. AZ01 is currently undergoing Phase I clinical trials in the US. Preclinical data indicates that AZ01 has the potential to be dosed once monthly compared to the current standard of care dosed anywhere from once daily to once per week.Allozyne was founded in 2005 by Caltech researchers and was incubated by Accelerator Corporation. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Allozyne | Date: 2012-04-25

The invention provides compositions and methods of identifying, modifying and producing modified target molecules, including therapeutic molecules by modification with non-natural amino acids. Certain aspects of the invention include methods of adding a chemical moiety to a target molecule, and the compositions resulting therefrom. Certain aspects of the invention also relate to kits for identifying, modifying and producing modified target molecules described herein.


Patent
Allozyne | Date: 2013-09-24

There are provided amino acid derivatives of formula V and VI as defined herein which are pyrrolysine analogs for use in bioconjugation processes.


Patent
Allozyne | Date: 2013-04-17

The invention provides compositions and methods of identifying, modifying and producing modified target molecules, including therapeutic molecules by modification with non-natural amino acids. Certain aspects of the invention include methods of adding a chemical moiety to a target molecule, and the compositions resulting therefrom. Certain aspects of the invention also relate to kits for identifying, modifying and producing modified target molecules described herein.


Patent
Allozyne | Date: 2011-12-14

The invention provides compositions and methods of identifying, modifying and producing modified target molecules, including therapeutic molecules by modification with non-natural amino acids. Certain aspects of the invention include methods of adding a chemical moiety to a target molecule, and the compositions resulting therefrom. Certain aspects of the invention also relate to kits for identifying, modifying and producing modified target molecules described herein.


Patent
Allozyne | Date: 2013-09-24

There is provided inter alia a process for stabilizing a eukaryotic cell line which expresses PylRS and tRNAPyl and which is suitable for incorporation of a gene encoding a target protein containing one or more non-natural amino acids encoded by a nonsense codon which comprises culturing said cell line under conditions in which the adverse effect of tRNAPyl expression on cell viability and/or cell growth is reduced or eliminated.


Patent
Allozyne | Date: 2013-10-16

The invention provides compositions and methods of identifying, modifying and producing modified target molecules, including therapeutic molecules by modification with non-natural amino acids. Certain aspects of the invention include methods of adding a chemical moiety to a target molecule, and the compositions resulting therefrom. Certain aspects of the invention also relate to kits for identifying, modifying and producing modified target molecules described herein.


Allozyne can’t be accused of thinking too small. The Seattle-based startup, after taking a hard look at its first clinical trial, is daring to push ahead with a frontal attack on the world’s largest maker of multiple sclerosis drugs, Weston, MA-based Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB). The challenger’s experimental treatment, a long-lasting injection for multiple sclerosis, was safe and well-tolerated at all three doses in its first study in 40 healthy volunteers. Allozyne’s drug, importantly, stayed active in people’s bloodstreams for about 14 days at a high and medium dose, which means Allozyne has a shot at making a product that MS patients could inject themselves once a month, instead of once or twice a week as they do today. The company is releasing the results today in the hopes of wowing Big Pharma dealmakers and venture capitalists gathered in San Francisco for the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference. There’s no cure out there for multiple sclerosis, a disease in which the immune system goes haywire, attacking nerve cells, and ultimately robbing patients of their vision, speech, and their ability to walk. More than 400,000 patients in the U.S. have this chronic disease. What drug companies know is that many people can keep symptoms at bay for years with interferon-beta products which tamp down the immune system. The interferons—marketed as Biogen Idec’s Avonex, Merck KGaA’s Rebif, and Bayer’s Betaseron—generate billions in sales. But they don’t stop the progressive march of the disease, and patients often complain about all the injections they must endure. That has created intense interest over the years in making a longer-lasting form of interferon. Allozyne—and Biogen Idec, the market leader—have both hit upon the same idea, combining the interferon beta molecule with a polymer that’s supposed to keep it stable in the bloodstream for a longer period of time. Even though Biogen had a big head start and ought to have the first mover advantage, CEO Meenu Chhabra says she is emboldened to challenge Biogen in this market now that she has clinical trial data, and a plan to take it the rest of the way through clinical trials to the market. “Allozyne is no longer just an Accelerator graduate with an interesting platform technology,” Chhabra says. “We’re a clinical stage company with a pipeline of products. It’s an evolution.” OK, so what did we really learn from the first clinical trial? I have to say a healthy grain of salt here is required, because these results haven’t been presented in a peer-reviewed journal or at a scientific conference. Chhabra walked me through the trial results last night, and what it means strategically, along with Bruce Leuchter, the director of clinical neuropsychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, and a member of Allozyne’s clinical advisory board. The Allozyne study found that its drug, AZ01, given via an injection just under the skin, was well-tolerated—although there were some flu-like symptoms at the highest dose tested, Chhabra says. The drug lasted about 14 days in the bloodstream, at both a 3 milligram dose, and a 10 milligram dose, although the lower dose produced a more steady, stable concentration, Chhabra says. The Allozyne study wasn’t designed to answer any important questions about effectiveness—like its impact on brain lesions, MS flares, or ability to keep patients from becoming disabled. While the Allozyne trial didn’t directly compare its drug … Next Page »


News Article | March 15, 2013
Site: www.xconomy.com

Seattle-based Allozyne, one of the promising biotech drug developers to graduate from the venture-backed Accelerator, recently conducted a small round of employee furloughs. Allozyne made the latest round of reductions to its payroll a little more than a year after another round of job cuts that I reported here in January 2012. CEO Meenu Chhabra Karson said by e-mail, “We did not lay off anyone recently,” but declined to answer further questions. Three other sources close to the situation said staff reductions were made recently at Allozyne and described internally not as “layoffs” but as “furloughs,” which suggests the people affected may be called back. On the company Web page, Chhabra Karson and Ken Grabstein, the chief scientific officer, are the only members still listed as part of its management team. Allozyne got off to an auspicious start in 2005, with backing from Accelerator and technology licensed from Caltech to engineer desirable properties into targeted protein-based drugs. The company had more than 20 employees at one point, and spent about $50 million of investment capital in its first five years in business, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission in October 2011. But Allozyne ran into difficulty when a reverse merger deal fell apart in December of that year with Poniard Pharmaceuticals, which would have turned Allozyne into a public company. Regulatory filings from 2011 showed Allozyne got down to as little as $1.1 million of cash left in the bank while it was working on the Poniard merger. The company raised another $4 million of debt and warrant offerings between February and June of last year, according to more recent regulatory filings. The company spent much of its early days working on a genetically engineered form of interferon beta, a popular drug for multiple sclerosis. The Allozyne version was supposed to last longer in the bloodstream and enable patients to get by with fewer injections. That drug, AZ01, showed some encouraging properties in a small clinical trial and is still listed as part of the Allozyne pipeline on the company website, but its prospects appear limited. The world’s largest maker of multiple sclerosis drugs, Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) reported in January that its long-lasting version of interferon beta succeeded in a clinical trial of 1,500 patients. The competing drug showed it could control multiple sclerosis flare-ups in both an every-two-week injection and a once-monthly injection. That result essentially means Biogen Idec is putting itself in position to introduce its long-lasting version of interferon beta years before Allozyne’s could get to the market. The sales potential for such a drug is clearly big, as Biogen generated $2.9 billion in sales last year from its existing interferon-beta drug, Avonex, which requires more injections. Other than its multiple sclerosis drug candidate, Allozyne has also talked publicly about other drug development programs, including one that’s a bispecific antibody designed to hit two molecular targets instead of one, and an antibody-drug conjugate program that links a targeted antibody to a toxin that makes it more potent. Allozyne presented data at a scientific meeting in September that said its bispecific antibody candidate that binds with inflammatory molecules IL-6 and IL-17 was able to decrease symptoms of psoriasis in mice. In December, Allozyne said its antibody-drug conjugate aimed at breast cancer cells that overexpress the HER2 target was able to significantly shrink tumors in an animal study.


News Article | September 18, 2014
Site: www.xconomy.com

Sold For Parts, Accelerator Grad Allozyne Reaches End of the Line With barely a whisper, Seattle biotech Allozyne has been broken up for parts, with most of its assets sold off earlier this summer to a previous licensing partner, Xconomy has learned. The buyer was MedImmune, the biotech division of the multinational drug company AstraZeneca (NYSE: AZN), and the deal effectively ends the nine-year run of what was once a big name in Seattle biotech circles. “MedImmune did not acquire Allozyne; however, we did purchase rights to selected patents and technology that the company had either developed or licensed in,” according to MedImmune spokeswoman Tracy Rossin. Rossin did not elaborate, but a source familiar with the deal told Xconomy that while not a corporate change-over, the purchase is for “substantially all of Allozyne’s remaining assets, including IP.” The main asset left under Allozyne’s roof is its lead compound, AZ01, according to chairman Steve Gillis (pictured above), who is a managing director in the Seattle office of ARCH Venture Partners, a top investor in the company. In late 2011, Allozyne’s CEO and president at the time, Meenu Chhabra, told Xconomy that AZ01, a longer-acting version of the multiple sclerosis treatment beta interferon, was “on a Phase 3 trajectory in 2012“—a big leap for a drug that had at that point only completed Phase 1 studies. There’s no record in the NIH’s clinical trial database or Alloyne’s own press materials of a Phase 3 trial ever starting. ARCH’s Gillis told Xconomy that AZ01 is “Phase 3 ready” and “in the process of being partnered.” Gillis also wrote in an e-mail that “the MedImmune transaction provided up front funds and future payouts” but did not disclose details. It’s unclear how many—if any—employees remain. When asked, Gillis didn’t respond by publication time. (At last check, the Allozyne name is still posted in the lobby of the building the firm occupied in Seattle.) Allozyne raised at least $50 million in venture funding from ARCH, MPM Capital, OVP Venture Partners, and Amgen Ventures, plus several million more in debts and warrants. A high-profile graduate of Seattle’s Accelerator incubator, Allozyne suffered several bumps and bruises in recent years, starting around the time of Chhabra’s “Phase 3 trajectory” pronouncement. In late 2011, plans fell apart for a merger into the shell of a failed biotech, which would have taken Allozyne onto the public markets. From that point on, SEC records show its fundraising activity limited to a few million dollars in debt and warrants. In early 2013, Xconomy reported that Allozyne let several employees go, in a move the company described as “furloughs.” At that time, the company’s website listed only two remaining members of the management team, CEO Chhabra and chief scientific officer Ken Grabstein. Chhabra, who joined Allozyne as CEO in 2007, has since moved on. Earlier this summer she joined Proteostasis Therapeutics in Cambridge, MA, as president and CEO. The Proteostasis announcement, dated June 30, praised Chhabra’s work at Allozyne that “resulted in the lead program advancing directly from Phase 1 to Phase 3 and also triggered a strategic collaboration with a top tier pharmaceutical company that culminated in an eventual acquisition.” Though the implications of this statement—that Allozyne was acquired outright and that AZ01 has reached Phase 3 testing—are contradicted by the comments from MedImmune, ARCH’s Gillis, and others, it was until now the only public acknowledgment of any sort of sale. We reached out to Chhabra for comment. Via e-mail, … Next Page »

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