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CrowdReviews.com Partnered with Madridge Conferences to Announce International Conference on Immunology and Immunotechnology Immunology-2017 features highly enlightening and interactive sessions to encourage the exchange of ideas across a wide range of disciplines in the field of immunology. Immunology-2017 mainly showcases comprehensive approaches in immunology study and research. The field of Immunology is growing rapidly and its development is making tremendous impacts in medical sciences. Immunology-2017 invites the contributions related to immunology research. You can submit your work in these broad themes. Conference mainly focuses on: Clinical and cellular immunology Tumour and cancer immunology Neuro immunology Parasitology Autoimmunity and Therapathies Mucosal immunology Reproductive Immunology Immunobiology Infection & Inflammatory Disease Rheumatology Haematopoiesis Transplantation Immunology Virology Immunodermatology Molecular and Structural Immunology Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology Allergology and Immunology All the abstracts should be submitted through Immunology-2017 Speakers: · Nadir Kadri, Karolinska Institute, Sweden · Pawel Gajdanowicz, Wroclaw Medical University, Poland · Joel Babdor, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA · Kwan Chow, Washington University, USA · Abdallah Badou, Cadi Ayyad University, Morocco Immunology-2017 Organizing Committee: · Carmen Fernández , Stockholm University, Sweden · Carl Borrebaeck, Lund University, Sweden · SY Seong, Seoul National University College of Medicine, South Korea · Shi, Guo-Ping, Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA · Gideon Berke, Weizmann Institute of Science, Isreal · Eyad Elkord, United Arab Emirates University, United ArabEmirates · Noah Isakov, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Isreal · Joel Pomerantz, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA · NanShan Chang, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Taiwan · Hisaya Akiba, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Japan · Ricardo Luiz Dantas Machado, Evandro Chagas Institute, Brazil Immunology-2017 is organizing an outstanding Scientific Exhibition/Program and anticipates the world’s leading specialists involved in Immunology Research. They welcome Sponsorship and Exhibitions from the Companies and Organizations who wish to showcase their products at this exciting event. Register for the conference and book your slots at: Contact person: Sumanjani immunology@madridge.com immunology@madridge.net Naples, FL, May 09, 2017 --( PR.com )-- International Conference Immunology and Immunotechnology is going to be held during November 1-3, 2017 in Barcelona, Spain.Immunology-2017 features highly enlightening and interactive sessions to encourage the exchange of ideas across a wide range of disciplines in the field of immunology. Immunology-2017 mainly showcases comprehensive approaches in immunology study and research. The field of Immunology is growing rapidly and its development is making tremendous impacts in medical sciences.Immunology-2017 invites the contributions related to immunology research. You can submit your work in these broad themes.Conference mainly focuses on:Clinical and cellular immunologyTumour and cancer immunologyNeuro immunologyParasitologyAutoimmunity and TherapathiesMucosal immunologyReproductive ImmunologyImmunobiologyInfection & Inflammatory DiseaseRheumatologyHaematopoiesisTransplantation ImmunologyVirologyImmunodermatologyMolecular and Structural ImmunologyVeterinary Immunology and ImmunopathologyAllergology and ImmunologyAll the abstracts should be submitted through online abstract submission or can be mailed at immunology@madridge.com Immunology-2017 Speakers:· Nadir Kadri, Karolinska Institute, Sweden· Pawel Gajdanowicz, Wroclaw Medical University, Poland· Joel Babdor, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA· Kwan Chow, Washington University, USA· Abdallah Badou, Cadi Ayyad University, MoroccoImmunology-2017 Organizing Committee:· Carmen Fernández , Stockholm University, Sweden· Carl Borrebaeck, Lund University, Sweden· SY Seong, Seoul National University College of Medicine, South Korea· Shi, Guo-Ping, Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA· Gideon Berke, Weizmann Institute of Science, Isreal· Eyad Elkord, United Arab Emirates University, United ArabEmirates· Noah Isakov, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Isreal· Joel Pomerantz, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA· NanShan Chang, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Taiwan· Hisaya Akiba, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Japan· Ricardo Luiz Dantas Machado, Evandro Chagas Institute, BrazilImmunology-2017 is organizing an outstanding Scientific Exhibition/Program and anticipates the world’s leading specialists involved in Immunology Research. They welcome Sponsorship and Exhibitions from the Companies and Organizations who wish to showcase their products at this exciting event.Register for the conference and book your slots at: http://immunology.madridge.com/register.php Contact person:Sumanjani


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Phthalates, which are used as plasticizers in plastics, can considerably increase the risk of allergies among children. This was demonstrated by UFZ researchers in conjunction with scientists from the University of Leipzig and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in a current study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. According to this study, an increased risk of children developing allergic asthma exists if the mother has been particularly heavily exposed to phthalates during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The mother-child cohort from the LINA study was the starting and end point of this translational study. In our day-to-day lives, we come into contact with countless plastics containing plasticizers. These plasticizers, which also include the aforementioned phthalates, are used when processing plastics in order to make the products more flexible. Phthalates can enter our bodies through the skin, foodstuffs or respiration. "It is a well-known fact that phthalates affect our hormone system and can thereby have an adverse effect on our metabolism or fertility. But that's not the end of it," says UFZ environmental immunologist Dr Tobias Polte. "The results of our current study demonstrate that phthalates also interfere with the immune system and can significantly increase the risk of developing allergies." At the outset of the study, the team of UFZ researchers examined the urine of pregnant women from the LINA (lifestyle and environmental factors and their influence on the newborn-allergy-risk) mother-child cohort study and searched for metabolites of phthalates. The concentration level determined in each case was found to correlate with the occurrence of allergic asthma among the children. "There was a clearly discernible relationship between higher concentrations of the metabolite of benzylbutylphthalate (BBP) in the mother's urine and the presence of allergic asthma in their children", explains Dr Irina Lehmann, who heads the LINA study. Researchers were able to confirm the results from the mother-child cohort in the mouse model in collaboration with colleagues from the Medical Faculty at the University of Leipzig. In this process, mice were exposed to a certain phthalate concentration during pregnancy and the lactation period, which led to comparable concentrations of the BBP metabolite in urine to those observed in heavily exposed mothers from the LINA cohort. The offspring demonstrated a clear tendency to develop allergic asthma; even the third generation continued to be affected. Among the adult mice, on the other hand, there were no increased allergic symptoms. "The time factor is therefore decisive: if the organism is exposed to phthalates during the early stages of development, this may have effects on the risk of illness for the two subsequent generations," explains Polte. "The prenatal development process is thus clearly altered by the phthalate exposure." In order to establish precisely what may have been modified, Polte and his team, in collaboration with colleagues from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), took a close look at the genes of the young mice born to exposed mothers. So-called methyl groups were found in the DNA of these genes - and to a greater extent than is usually the case. In the course of this so-called epigenetic modification of the DNA, methyl groups attach themselves to a gene like a kind of padlock and thus prevent its code from being read, meaning that the associated protein cannot be produced. After the researchers treated the mice with a special substance intended to crack the methyl "locks" on the affected genes, the mice demonstrated fewer signs of allergic asthma than before. Dr Polte concludes the following: "Phthalates apparently switch off decisive genes by means of DNA methylation, causing the activity of these genes to be reduced in the young mice." But which genes cause allergic asthma if they cannot be read? So-called T-helper 2 cells play a central part in the development of allergies. These are kept in check by special opponents (repressors). If a repressor gene cannot be read as a result of being blocked by methyl groups, the T-helper 2 cells that are conducive to the development of allergies are no longer sufficiently inhibited, meaning that an allergy is likely to develop. "We surmise that this connection is decisive for the development of allergic asthma caused by phthalates," says Polte. "Furthermore, in the cell experiment, we were able to demonstrate that there is an increased formation of T-helper 2 cells from the immune cells of the offspring of exposed mother mice than is the case for the offspring of non-exposed animals. This enabled us to establish an increased tendency towards allergies once again." In mice, the researchers were able to prove that a repressor gene that has been switched off due to DNA methylation is responsible for the development of allergic asthma. But does this mechanism also play a part in humans? In order to answer this question, the researchers consulted the LINA cohort once more. They searched for the corresponding gene among the children with allergic asthma and studied the degree of methylation and gene activity. Here, too, it became apparent that the gene was blocked by methyl groups and thus could not be read. "Thanks to our translational study approach - which led from humans via the mouse model and cellular culture back to humans again - we have been able to demonstrate that epigenetic modifications are apparently responsible for the fact that children of mothers who had a high exposure to phthalates during pregnancy and breastfeeding have an increased risk of developing allergic asthma," says Polte. "The objective of our further research will be to understand exactly how specific phthalates give rise to the methylation of genes which are relevant for the development of allergies." Susanne Jahreis, Saskia Trump, Mario Bauer, Tobias Bauer, Loreen Thu?rmann, Ralph Feltens, Qi Wang, Lei Gu, Konrad Gru?tzmann, Stefan Röder, Marco Averbeck, Dieter Weichenhan, Christoph Plass, Ulrich Sack, Michael Borte, Virginie Dubourg, Gerrit, Schu?u?rmann, Jan C. Simon, Martin von Bergen, Jörg Hackermu?ller, Roland Eils, Irina Lehmann, Tobias Polte (2017): Maternal phthalate exposure promotes allergic airway inflammation over two generations via epigenetic modifications, Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2017.03.017; http://doi. PD Dr Tobias Polte Head of the Helmholtz University Research Group "Experimental Allergology and Immunology" Tel.: +49 341 235-1545 E-mail: tobias.polte@ufz.de https:/ Dr Irina Lehmann Head of the UFZ Department of Environmental Immunology Tel.: +49 341 235-1216 Email: irina.lehmann@ufz.de http://www.


Curjuric I.,University of Zürich | Curjuric I.,University of Basel | Imboden M.,University of Zürich | Schindler C.,University of Basel | And 53 more authors.
European Respiratory Journal | Year: 2010

Reduced exposure to particulate matter with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM10) attenuated age-related lung function decline in our cohort, particularly in the small airways. We hypothesised that polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase (GST) and haem oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) genes, important for oxidative stress defence, modify these beneficial effects. A population-based sample of 4,365 adults was followed up after 11 yrs, including questionnaire, spirometry and DNA blood sampling. PM10 exposure was estimated by dispersion modelling and temporal interpolation. The main effects on annual decline in forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of forced vital capacity (FEF25-75%) and interactions with PM10 reduction were investigated for polymorphisms HMOX1 rs2071746 (T/A), rs735266 (T/A) and rs5995098 (G/C), HMOX1 (GT)n promoter repeat, GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions, and GSTP1 p.Ile105Val, using mixed linear regression models. HMOX1 rs5995098, HMOX1 haplotype TTG and GSTP1 showed significant genetic main effects. Interactions with PM10 reduction were detected: a 10 μg·m-3 reduction significantly attenuated annual FEF25-75% decline by 15.3 mL·s-1 only in the absence of HMOX1 haplotype ATC. Similarly, carriers of long (GT)n promoter repeat alleles or the GSTP1 Val/Val genotype profited significantly more from a 10 mg?m-3 reduction (26.5 mL·s-1 and 27.3 mL·s-1 respectively) than non-carriers. Benefits of a reduction in PM10 exposure are not equally distributed across the population but are modified by the individual genetic make-up determining oxidative stress defence. Copyright©ERS Journals Ltd 2010.


Tsapis M.,Jean Verdier University Hospital | Tsapis M.,Avicenne University Hospital | Chabane H.,Delafontaine Hospital | Teychene A.M.,Jean Verdier University Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Revue Francaise d'Allergologie | Year: 2013

Allergic reactions following snail ingestion in house dust mite-sensitized patients are well known, although the allergens concerned in the cross-reactivity remain to be identified. We report the case of a fatal anaphylactic reaction following snail ingestion in a 10-year old boy, which occurred 2. months after conclusion of 3. years of house dust mite subcutaneous immunotherapy. This case highlights a possible cross-reaction between food and inhalant allergens leading to a fatal outcome. We discuss the relation between house dust mite immunotherapy and this fatal food allergic reaction. Conclusion: Physicians should be aware of the possibility of severe anaphylaxis following snail ingestion in house dust mite allergic patients undergoing subcutaneous immunotherapy as this appears to constitute a risk factor for such reactions. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

Scientists at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin have found which molecules from house dust mites are initially targeted by the immune system of children who develop (even years later) allergic rhinitis and asthma. The discovery, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, will open up new avenues not only to novel and more precise therapies, but also to a successful prediction and prevention of chronic rhinitis and asthma caused or aggravated by allergies to house dust mites. The study team was led by Professor Paolo Maria Matricardi, head of the Molecular Allergology Group at the Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Immunology of the Charité and included researchers from the Medical University of Vienna, lead by Professor Rudolf Valenta, and statisticians from Rome. The team examined the data and blood samples collected over 20 years from a group of 722 German children born in 1990; they were monitored since their birth in the framework of the Multicenter Allergy Study (MAS). Purified or engineered molecules of the mite Dermatophagoides Pteronyssinus were used with nanotechnology procedures to characterize the origins and evolution of the antibody response during the children’s first decades of life. The scientists found that IgE-antibodies against three dust mite molecules (Der p 1, Der p 2, and Der p 23) appeared very early in the children’s blood, often before the onset of their disease. In some (but not all) children, this first step was followed by a “cascade” of events involving other mite molecules, through a phenomenon defined as “molecular spreading.” Children producing IgE to many molecules (“polymolecular sensitization”) had a higher risk of developing allergic rhinitis and asthma. Earlier onset of allergic sensitization, high exposure to house dust mite allergens, and having one or both parents affected by hay fever increased the risk of polymolecular sensitization. Interestingly, healthy pre-school children showing IgE antibodies to Der p 1 or Der p 23 developed more frequently asthma at school age. These and other molecules may be used for disease prevention in early life and to precisely tailor allergen immunotherapy in pediatric and adult patients. “Mite allergy develops in childhood like an avalanche. It starts early with only one or a very few molecules and then grows to many,” says Dr. Daniela Posa, first author of the publication. "The greater the spreading of molecular sensitization, the highest the risk of developing Asthma." Matricardi adds, “Our findings open new perspectives to the use of mite allergen molecules for prediction, prevention and therapy of allergic rhinitis and asthma caused or triggered by house dust mites.”


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The study team was lead by Professor Paolo Maria Matricardi, head of the Molecular Allergology Group at the Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Immunology of the Charité and included researchers from the Medical University of Vienna, lead by Prof. Rudolf Valenta, and statisticians from Rome, Italy. The team examined the data and blood samples prospectively collected over 20 years from a cohort of 722 German children born in 1990 and monitored since their birth in the framework of the Multicenter Allergy Study (MAS). Purified or engineered molecules of the mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus were used with nanotechnology procedures to characterize the origins and evolution of the antibody response during the children's first decades of life. The scientists found that IgE-antibodies against three dust mite molecules (Der p 1, Der p 2 and Der p 23) appeared very early in the children's blood, often before the onset of their disease. In some (but not all) children, this first step was followed by a "cascade" of events involving other mite molecules, through a phenomenon defined as "molecular spreading". Children producing IgE to many molecules ("polymolecular sensitization") had a higher risk of developing allergic rhinitis and asthma. Earlier onset of allergic sensitization, high exposure to house dust mite allergens, and having one or both parents affected by hay fever increased the risk of polymolecular sensitization. Interestingly, healthy pre-school children showing IgE antibodies to Der p 1 or Der p 23 developed more frequently asthma at school age. These and other molecules may be used for disease prevention in early life and to precisely tailor allergen immunotherapy in pediatric and adult patients. "Mite allergy develops in childhood like an avalanche. It starts early with only one or a very few molecules and then grows to many", says Dr Daniela Posa,, first Author of the publication. "The greater the spreading of molecular sensitization, the highest the risk of developing Asthma." PD. Dr. Matricardi adds: "Our findings open new perspectives to the use of mite allergen molecules for prediction, prevention and therapy of allergic rhinitis and asthma caused or triggered by House Dust Mites."


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Scientists at the Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin found which molecules of the house dust mites are initially targeted by the immune system of children developing, even years later, allergic rhinitis and asthma. The discovery, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, will open up new avenues not only to novel and more precise therapies, but also to a successful prediction and prevention of chronic rhinitis and asthma caused or aggravated by allergy to house dust mites. The study team was lead by Professor Paolo Maria Matricardi, head of the Molecular Allergology Group at the Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Immunology of the Charité and included researchers from the Medical University of Vienna, lead by Prof. Rudolf Valenta, and statisticians from Rome, Italy. The team examined the data and blood samples prospectively collected over 20 years from a cohort of 722 German children born in 1990 and monitored since their birth in the framework of the Multicenter Allergy Study (MAS). Purified or engineered molecules of the mite Dermatophagoides Pteronyssinus were used with nanotechnology procedures to characterize the origins and evolution of the antibody response during the children's first decades of life The scientists found that IgE-antibodies against three dust mite molecules (Der p 1, Der p 2 and Der p 23) appeared very early in the children's blood, often before the onset of their disease. In some (but not all) children, this first step was followed by a "cascade" of events involving other mite molecules, through a phenomenon defined as "molecular spreading." Children producing IgE to many molecules ("polymolecular sensitization") had a higher risk of developing allergic rhinitis and asthma. Earlier onset of allergic sensitization, high exposure to house dust mite allergens, and having one or both parents affected by hay fever increased the risk of polymolecular sensitization. Interestingly, healthy pre-school children showing IgE antibodies to Der p 1 or Der p 23 developed more frequently asthma at school age. These and other molecules may be used for disease prevention in early life and to precisely tailor allergen immunotherapy in pediatric and adult patients. "Mite allergy develops in childhood like an avalanche. It starts early with only one or a very few molecules and then grows to many," says Dr Daniela Posa,, first Author of the publication. "The greater the spreading of molecular sensitization, the highest the risk of developing Asthma." PD. Dr. Matricardi adds: "Our findings open new perspectives to the use of mite allergen molecules for prediction, prevention and therapy of allergic rhinitis and asthma caused or triggered by House Dust Mites."


Spielmanns M.,St Remigius Hospital | Spielmanns M.,Witten/Herdecke University | Fuchs-Bergsma C.,St Remigius Hospital | Winkler A.,St Remigius Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Respiratory Care | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND: It is well established that physical training enhances functionality and quality of life in patients with COPD. However, little data exist concerning the effects of the usefulness of oxygen supply during exercise training for > 3 months in patients with COPD who are normoxemic at rest and during exercise. We hypothesized that oxygen supply during training sessions enables higher training intensity and thus optimizes training results in patients with COPD. METHODS: In this blinded randomized controlled study, we carried out a 24-week training program with progressively increasing loads involving large muscle groups. In addition, we compared the influences of oxygen supplementation. Thirty-six subjects with moderate-to-severe COPD who were not dependent on long-term oxygen therapy trained under supervision for 24 weeks (3 times/week at 30 min/session). Subjects were randomized into 2 groups: oxygen supply via nasal cannula at a flow of 4 L/min and compressed air at the same flow throughout the training program. Lung function tests at rest (inspiratory vital capacity, FEV1, Tiffeneau index), cycle spiroergometry (peak ventilation, peak oxygen uptake, peak respiratory exchange rate, submaximal and peak lactic acid concentrations), 6-min walk tests, and quality-of-life assessments (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form questionnaire) were conducted before and after 12 and 24 weeks. RESULTS: Independent of oxygen supplementation, statistically significant improvements occurred in quality of life, maximal tolerated load during cycling, peak oxygen uptake, and 6-min walk test after 12 weeks of training. Notably, there were no further improvements from 12 to 24 weeks despite progressively increased training loads. CONCLUSIONS: Endurance training 3 times/week resulted in significant improvements in quality of life and exercise capacity in subjects with moderate-to-severe COPD within the initial 12 weeks, followed by a stable period over the following 12 weeks with no further benefits of supplemental oxygen. © 2015 Daedalus Enterprises.


Hoxha M.,Allergology | Deliu A.,University of Tirana | Nikolla E.,University of Tirana | Loloci G.,University of Tirana | Kalo T.,University of Tirana
Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences | Year: 2014

Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA), is a severe form of allergy for which the ingestion of a specific food, usually before physical exercise induces symptoms of anaphylaxis. Patients typically have IgE antibodies to the food that triggers the reactions; however, the symptoms appear only if the co-factors act together. The most common reported cause of these reactions seems to be wheat. In some cases FDEIA is displayed even when the food is eaten immediately after exercise, showing that in FDEIA, not the sequence but rather the coincidence of triggering factors use, is of crucial importance. The risk to develop anaphylaxis in these patients depends on the presence and, in some cases, on the amount of cofactors of anaphylaxis. There are lots of evidences about the role of NSAIDs as cofactors of anaphylaxis. © 2014 Hoxha et al.

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