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Sammons H.M.,University of Nottingham | Gubarev M.I.,SALt Inc | Krepkova L.V.,All Russian Research Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants VILAR | Bortnikova V.V.,All Russian Research Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants VILAR | And 4 more authors.
Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology | Year: 2016

Introduction: Herbal medicines (HMs) have been well known to people of the European Union (EU) and Russia for centuries. Currently, Western HMs can be classified into two categories, plant-derived conventional medicines and dietary supplements. Interest to HMs has grown rapidly in all countries during the past two decades. Areas covered: The main goal of this review article is to present the history of HMs in the EU and Russia, forms of modern HMs, including Oriental Medicines that are popular among consumers of both countries. Additional discussion points comprise safety and adulteration issues associated with HMs, including regulatory changes and new legislative measures undertaken by the authorities. Materials available from legislative and governmental websites, PubMed and news media were used. Expert commentary: Due to cultural diversities in the EU and Russia, traditional HMs of other regions, particularly Chinese Traditional and Ayurvedic medicines, are also popular. Recently, dietary supplements containing multiple herbal and other natural products have flooded the EU and Russian markets. Pharmacovigilance in these markets is challenging in terms of establishing quality and safety of ingredients, determining efficacy, and defining risks of herb-herb and herb-drug interactions. Both the EU and Russia have introduced new legislation aimed to overcome these deficiencies. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.


PubMed | University of Utah, SALt Inc, All Russian Research Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants VILAR and University of Nottingham
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Expert review of clinical pharmacology | Year: 2016

Herbal medicines (HMs) have been well known to people of the European Union (EU) and Russia for centuries. Currently, Western HMs can be classified into two categories, plant-derived conventional medicines and dietary supplements. Interest to HMs has grown rapidly in all countries during the past two decades.The main goal of this review article is to present the history of HMs in the EU and Russia, forms of modern HMs, including Oriental Medicines that are popular among consumers of both countries. Additional discussion points comprise safety and adulteration issues associated with HMs, including regulatory changes and new legislative measures undertaken by the authorities. Materials available from legislative and governmental websites, PubMed and news media were used. Expert commentary: Due to cultural diversities in the EU and Russia, traditional HMs of other regions, particularly Chinese Traditional and Ayurvedic medicines, are also popular. Recently, dietary supplements containing multiple herbal and other natural products have flooded the EU and Russian markets. Pharmacovigilance in these markets is challenging in terms of establishing quality and safety of ingredients, determining efficacy, and defining risks of herb-herb and herb-drug interactions. Both the EU and Russia have introduced new legislation aimed to overcome these deficiencies.


PubMed | University of Otago, University of Utah, SALt Inc and All Russian Research Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants VILAR
Type: | Journal: Expert review of clinical pharmacology | Year: 2016

Herbal medicine (HM) use is growing worldwide. Single herb preparations, ethnic and modern HM formulations are widely used as adjunct therapies or to improve consumer wellbeing. Areas covered: This final part in the publication series summarizes common tendencies in HM use as adjunct or alternative medicine, education of healthcare professionals and consumers, current and proposed guidelines regulating of production. We discuss potential HM-HM and HM-drug interactions that could lead to severe adverse events in situations where HMs are taken without proper medical professional oversight. Expert commentary: A number of serious problems have arisen with the steady global increase in HM use. HM interaction with conventional drugs (CD) may result in inadequate dosing of CD or adverse reactions; HM-HM interaction within herbal supplements could lead to toxicity of formulations. Inadequate education of clinicians and patients regarding medicinal properties of HMs must be addressed regionally and globally to ensure consumer safety.


Skalny A.A.,Ryazan State Medical University | Skalny A.A.,RUDN University | Medvedeva Y.S.,Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology | Alchinova I.B.,Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Applied Biomedicine | Year: 2016

Purpose: Investigation of the effect of exercise and zinc (Zn) supplementation on trace element status in rats. Methods: 24 male Wistar were divided into four groups: control, exercised, Zn-supplemented (15. mg/kg weight Zn asparaginate), exercised Zn-supplemented. Zn was supplemented as Zn asparaginate. Serum lactate and creatinine levels, and creatine kinase activity were assessed. Tissue trace elements were estimated using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: Exercise significantly increased lactate, and creatinine levels. Exercise significantly decreased muscle, kidney, and hair Zn; liver, muscle and serum Co; serum Fe; myocardial and hair Cu; liver, heart, skeletal muscle and kidney Se levels. Oppositely, exercise results in elevation of liver Zn; heart and skeletal muscle, kidney and hair Fe; kidney Cu; liver and hair Mn; serum and hair Se content. Zn supplementation reduced exercise-induced increase in lactate and creatinine levels, and elevated liver, kidney, heart, and hair Zn content in exercised rats. Supplementation with Zn reversed exercise-induced decrease in Co levels and increased Fe and Se stores in animals with high physical activity. Conclusions: Beneficial effect of zinc supplementation in exercised organism may be associated not only with modulation of zinc status but regulation of other essential trace elements status and their biological effects. © 2016.


PubMed | National Institute for Occupational Safety, RUDN University, Orenburg State University, Yaroslavl State University and All Russian Research Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants VILAR
Type: | Journal: Environmental science and pollution research international | Year: 2016

The objective of the investigation is comparative analysis of hair trace element content in workers of different departments of petrochemical plant. A total of 75 men working in office (engineers), and departments 1 (D

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