New Delhi, India

The All India Institutes of Medical science are a group of autonomous public medical colleges of higher education. AIIMS New Delhi, the fore-runner parent excellence institution, was established in 1956. Wikipedia.


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Hossein Aliabadi, MD, FAAP, Pediatric Urologist at Pediatric Urology Associates, and affiliated with the Children’s Hospitals & Clinics of Minnesota and Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Hossein Aliabadi is a very experienced urologist, having been in practice for more than 36 years. His medical career began in India in 1980, when he graduated from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi. After moving to the United States, he completed residencies at Regions Hospital in St. Paul and at the University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis. Dr. Aliabadi then completed a fellowship at the University of Toronto Hospital for Sick Children in Ontario, Canada. Dr. Aliabadi is certified by the American Board of Urology, has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and is renowned across Minnesota and beyond as a specialist in pediatric urology. He is a noted expert in prenatally diagnosed fetal anomalies, and in genitourinary tract reconstruction, and has published a number of medical papers in these areas. Dr. Aliabadi is committed to keeping up to date with the latest technological advances in pediatric urology. He does this through his membership of professional organizations including the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons and the American College of Surgeons. His expertise and dedication makes Dr. Hossein Aliabadi a very deserving winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


AIIMS and CSIR IGIB Ink Deal for Partnership in Clinical and Translational Genomics, Expanding on Reach of the GUaRDIAN Programme The All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) Delhi and CSIR Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (CSIR-IGIB) inked a deal for collaborative research in the area of Rare Diseases and application of genomics to aid clinical decisions, expanding on the reach of the GUaRDIAN programme. New Delhi, India, May 28, 2017 --( AIIMS Delhi is a premier Institute for medical education and research in India, having extraordinary infrastructure, specialized medical/paramedical staff, management and state of the art facilities for patient care, training programmes and research activities. CSIR-IGIB is one of the premier Institutes in India pioneering cutting edge advancements in Genomic Science and a constituent laboratory of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). Research at CSIR-IGIB spans a variety of areas including Genomics & Molecular Medicine, Chemical & Systems Biology, Genome Informatics & Structural Biology, Respiratory Disease Biology and Energy & Environmental Biotechnology. As part of the agreement, AIIMS Delhi and CSIR IGIB would collaborate in the area of genetic diseases as well as application of genomics in clinical settings. This would include formulation and participation in joint collaborative programs spanning genomics for aiding the diagnosis, understanding the prognosis and aiding precise therapy of genetic diseases. The deal would also enable faculty members of both institutes to actively participate in formulating and implementing collaborative programs aimed at accelerating the application of genomics to aid clinical decisions. The deal would also allow AIIMS Delhi to access the state of the art genomics and bioinformatics infrastructure as well as the clinical genomics analytical resources at CSIR IGIB to enable fast, accurate and cost effective diagnosis of genetic diseases for patients coming to AIIMS Delhi. CSIR IGIB has been a pioneer in translational genomics in India. The Genomics for Understanding Rare Diseases India Alliance Network (GUaRDIAN) is a focussed translational research programme in the area of Rare Diseases initiated in the year 2015. The programme has evolved to become one of the largest of its kind in the area of Rare genetic diseases with a clinical collaborative network of over 100 clinicians from over 35 clinical centres across India working on Rare Diseases. A complementary programme entitled Genomics and other Omics tools for Enabling Medical Decisions (GOMED) initiated last year at CSIR IGIB enables affordable and equitable access to genetic diagnosis. The programme covers genetic tests for over 80 genes and has already catered to over 2000 patients in from over 25 Centres from across India. Skilled manpower is undoubtedly essential to advance and accelerate clinical adoption of genomics. This deal also envisages imparting genomics knowledge for practicing clinicians through training and education as well as faculty exchange. This would surely provide impetus to national initiatives like the Skill India programme. The deal also envisages setting up collaborative research programmes aimed at accelerating research in the area of clinical genomics in India. New Delhi, India, May 28, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) Delhi and CSIR Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (CSIR-IGIB) inked a deal for collaborative research in the area of Rare Diseases and application of genomics to aid clinical decisions.AIIMS Delhi is a premier Institute for medical education and research in India, having extraordinary infrastructure, specialized medical/paramedical staff, management and state of the art facilities for patient care, training programmes and research activities. CSIR-IGIB is one of the premier Institutes in India pioneering cutting edge advancements in Genomic Science and a constituent laboratory of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). Research at CSIR-IGIB spans a variety of areas including Genomics & Molecular Medicine, Chemical & Systems Biology, Genome Informatics & Structural Biology, Respiratory Disease Biology and Energy & Environmental Biotechnology.As part of the agreement, AIIMS Delhi and CSIR IGIB would collaborate in the area of genetic diseases as well as application of genomics in clinical settings. This would include formulation and participation in joint collaborative programs spanning genomics for aiding the diagnosis, understanding the prognosis and aiding precise therapy of genetic diseases. The deal would also enable faculty members of both institutes to actively participate in formulating and implementing collaborative programs aimed at accelerating the application of genomics to aid clinical decisions.The deal would also allow AIIMS Delhi to access the state of the art genomics and bioinformatics infrastructure as well as the clinical genomics analytical resources at CSIR IGIB to enable fast, accurate and cost effective diagnosis of genetic diseases for patients coming to AIIMS Delhi.CSIR IGIB has been a pioneer in translational genomics in India. The Genomics for Understanding Rare Diseases India Alliance Network (GUaRDIAN) is a focussed translational research programme in the area of Rare Diseases initiated in the year 2015. The programme has evolved to become one of the largest of its kind in the area of Rare genetic diseases with a clinical collaborative network of over 100 clinicians from over 35 clinical centres across India working on Rare Diseases.A complementary programme entitled Genomics and other Omics tools for Enabling Medical Decisions (GOMED) initiated last year at CSIR IGIB enables affordable and equitable access to genetic diagnosis. The programme covers genetic tests for over 80 genes and has already catered to over 2000 patients in from over 25 Centres from across India.Skilled manpower is undoubtedly essential to advance and accelerate clinical adoption of genomics. This deal also envisages imparting genomics knowledge for practicing clinicians through training and education as well as faculty exchange. This would surely provide impetus to national initiatives like the Skill India programme. The deal also envisages setting up collaborative research programmes aimed at accelerating research in the area of clinical genomics in India.


This invention relates to a thermoluminescent phosphor for the measurement of low radiation doses, including calcium sulphate (CaSO_(4)), Dysprosium (Dy) and manganese (Mn), wherein Dy and Mn are present as dopants. A process for the preparation of a thermoluminescent phosphor is also provided. The process includes the steps of: separately dissolving calcium sulphate (CaSO4), Dysprosium chloride (DyCh) and Manganese chloride (MnC) in hot concentrated sulphuric acid, to obtain sulphuric acid solutions of CaSO4, DyCb and MnCb; mixing the solutions; and followed by slow evaporation of the solvent to obtain a powder of microcrystalline phosphor of CaSO4:Dy, Mn.


Patent
National Brain Research Center and All India Institute of Medical Sciences | Date: 2014-05-10

The present invention relates to cell specific therapeutic modality by using a region of the PLAP Promoter. The invention further relates to specific expression of therapeutically PLAP useful sequences for specific transcriptional activation of this gene. The invention also relates to the PLAP region which may be used alone or in combination with other regions like enhancer sequences that augment cell or tumour specific gene expression.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.3.4-2 | Award Amount: 7.92M | Year: 2013

The trypanosomatid diseases, leishmaniasis, Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and Chagas disease (CD), continue to impart a heavy toll on human health. The treatments available are limited and threatened by drug resistance with few newdrugs in the pipeline. The KINDReD consortium integrates five leading academic laboratories in Europe (Portugal, United Kingdom, and Switzerland), the USA (California) and South America (Brazil) with high throughput screening (HTS) facilities equally distributed between all three major kinetoplastid parasites. Intracellular amastigote screening will be employed as the most relevant for Leishmania spp and T cruzi. Compound libraries (focused, diversity oriented or natural) will be screened in these systems, as well as compound series devised through target screening and in silico approaches. For carefully chosen protein targets, all three kinetoplastid parasite homologs will be screened against the closest human homolog to establish selectivity. Promising lead compounds will be optimised for efficacy and tolerability in cell-based and animal disease models. Toxicological markers will be evaluated in human cell lines prior to toxicity (acute,subacute,chronic) testing in lower then higher mammals. In parallel, and in line with the FDAs Critical Path Initiative, several check point controls will be built into the pipeline to flag, identify and allow early correction of potential toxicity/efficacy issues. These will include (i) a systems biology approach to identify drug target and off-target interactions via activity-based chemoproteomics (ii) uptake and metabolismas potential modulators of drug efficacy and/or resistance and (iii) the establishment of a firm set of rules for drug efficacy and safety in kinetoplastid chemotherapy. Our goal is to strengthen the drug development pipeline in order to achieve at least one new Phase I clinical candidate for each trypanosomatid disease at or shortly after the project completion date.


Sharma S.K.,All India Institute of Medical Sciences
The Cochrane database of systematic reviews | Year: 2013

Preventing active tuberculosis (TB) from developing in people with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is important for global TB control. Isoniazid (INH) for six to nine months has 60% to 90% protective efficacy, but the treatment period is long, liver toxicity is a problem, and completion rates outside trials are only around 50%. Rifampicin or rifamycin-combination treatments are shorter and may result in higher and a 1998 trial in people without silicosis (two trials, 524 participants; high quality evidence). No difference was detected for treatment-limiting adverse events (two trials, 536 participants; low quality evidence), or hepatotoxicity (two trials, 536 participants; low quality evidence). Rifampicin plus pyrazinamide (two months) vs. INH (six months)Three small trials published in 1994, 2003, and 2005 compared these two regimens, and two reported a low occurrence of active TB, with no statistically significant differences between treatment regimens (two trials, 176 participants; very low quality evidence) though, apart from one child from the 1994 trial, these data on active TB were from the 2003 trial in adults with silicosis. Adherence with both regimens was low with no statistically significant differences (four trials, 700 participants; very low quality evidence). However, people receiving rifampicin plus pyrazinamide had more treatment-limiting adverse events (RR 3.61, 95% CI 1.82 to 7.19; two trials, 368 participants; high quality evidence), and hepatotoxicity (RR 4.59, 95% 2.14 to 9.85; three trials, 540 participants; moderate quality evidence). Weekly, directly-observed rifapentine plus INH (three months) vs. daily, self-administered INH (nine months)A large trial conducted from 2001 to 2008 among close contacts of TB in the USA, Canada, Brazil and Spain found directly observed weekly treatment to be non-inferior to nine months self-administered INH for the incidence of active TB (0.2% vs 0.4%, RR 0.44, 95% CI 0.18 to 1.07, one trial, 7731 participants; moderate quality evidence). The directly-observed, shorter regimen had higher treatment completion (82% vs 69%, RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.22, moderate quality evidence), and less hepatotoxicity (0.4% versus 2.4%; RR 0.16, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.27; high quality evidence), though treatment-limiting adverse events were more frequent (4.9% versus 3.7%; RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.64 moderate quality evidence) Trials to date of shortened prophylactic regimens using rifampicin alone have not demonstrated higher rates of active TB when compared to longer regimens with INH. Treatment completion is probably higher and adverse events may be fewer with shorter rifampicin regimens. Shortened regimens of rifampicin with INH may offer no advantage over longer INH regimens. Rifampicin combined with pyrazinamide is associated with more adverse events. A weekly regimen of rifapentine plus INH has higher completion rates, and less liver toxicity, though treatment discontinuation due to adverse events is probably more likely than with INH.


Conservative treatment (intensive care, a combination of antimicrobial agents, and nutritional support, with or without drainage of the infected fluid) has recently been shown to be effective for patients with infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN), but the data from individual studies are not robust enough to recommend it as the standard of care. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies related to primary conservative management for IPN. We performed a literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed from January 1990 to March 2012 for studies of a priori protocols for primary conservative treatment, without necrosectomy, for consecutive patients with IPN. We analyzed data from 8 studies, comprising 324 patients with IPN who received primary conservative management. We then analyzed an additional 4 studies (comprising 157 patients) that reported the efficacy of percutaneous drainage in nonconsecutive patients with IPN. Outcome measures were the success of conservative management strategy, need for necrosectomy, and mortality. There was significant heterogeneity in results among the studies. Based on a random effects model, conservative management was successful for 64% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 51%-78%); mortality was 12% (95% CI, 6%-18%), and 26% of patients required necrosectomy or additional surgery for complications (95% CI, 15%-37%). A separate analysis of 4 studies that reported outcomes of nonconsecutive patients with IPN following percutaneous drainage had comparable results; 50% had successful outcomes (95% CI, 43%-58%), mortality was 18% (95% CI, 6%-30%), and 38% of patients required surgery (95% CI, 20%-56%). Conservative management without necrosectomy is a successful approach for 64% of patients with IPN. This approach has low mortality and prevents surgical necrosectomy. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Mansoori N.,All India Institute of Medical Sciences
Neurobiology of aging | Year: 2012

Genetic risk factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). In this case-control study, we examined C677T and A1298C (rs1801133 and rs1801131) polymorphism in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genes and their correlation with plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) in AD and VaD cases and evaluated the gene-gene interaction (epistasis) with IL-6-174 G/C (rs1800795). CC genotype was associated with elevated levels of plasma homocysteine (p = 0.004) as compared with genotype AA of rs1801131. In AD, we observed a significant (p = 0.04) association with C alleles of rs1801131. Regression analysis revealed that the presence of both rs1801133 T and rs1800795 C alleles increased the odds of developing AD by 2.5 and VaD by 3.7-fold. While rs1800795 (CC or GC) genotypes alone increased the odds of developing VaD by 2.2-fold, the presence of CC genotype of rs1801131 nullified this effect. The findings support the hypothesis that multiple genes are involved to alter the odds of developing AD and VaD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Lakshmy R.,All India Institute of Medical Sciences
Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders | Year: 2013

Development of metabolic syndrome is attributed to genes, dietary intake, physical activity and environmental factors. Fetal programming due to maternal nutrition is also an important factor especially in developing countries where intrauterine growth retardation followed by excess nutrition postnatally is causing mismatch predisposing individuals to development of metabolic syndrome and its components. Several epidemiological and animal studies have provided evidence for the link between intrauterine growth retardation and adult metabolic diseases. Deficiency of macronutrients, protein and carbohydrates, during pregnancy and gestation results in lower infant birth weight, a surrogate marker of fetal growth and subsequently insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension and adiposity in adulthood. The role of micronutrients is less extensively studied but however gaining attention with several recent studies focusing on this aspect. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the developmental origin of adult diseases important among them being alteration of hypothalamic pituitary axis, epigenetic regulation of gene expression and oxidative stress. All of these mechanisms may be acting at different time during gestation and contributing to development of metabolic syndrome in adulthood. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


The present invention pertains to the field of neurosurgery and describes new methods to reduce basilar invagination (BI) and atlanto-axial dislocation (AAD). The invention further discloses novel surgical instruments useful in reducing basilar invagination (BI) and atlanto-axial dislocation (AAD). The novel techniques disclosed include distraction, compression and extension reduction and dynamic distraction coupled with cable compression.

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