All India Coordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture

Akola, India

All India Coordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture

Akola, India
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Sankar G.R.M.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Sharma K.L.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Gabhane V.V.,All India Coordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture | Nagdeve M.B.,All India Coordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture | And 12 more authors.
Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis | Year: 2014

Long-term fertilizer experiments were conducted on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) for 21 years with eight fertilizer treatments in a fixed site during 1987-2007 to identify an efficient treatment to ensure maximum yield, greater sustainability, monetary returns, rainwater-use efficiency, and soil fertility over years. The results indicated that the yield was significantly influenced by fertilizer treatments in all years except 1987 1988, and 1994. The mean cotton yield ranged from 492 kg ha-1 under the control to 805 kg ha-1 under 25 kg nitrogen (N) [farmyard manure (FYM)] + 25 kg N (urea) + 25 kg phosphorus (P) ha-1. Among the nutrients, soil N buildup was observed with all treatments, whereas application of 25 kg N + 12.5 kg P ha-1 exhibited increase in P status. Interestingly, depletion of potassium (K) was recorded under all the fertilizer treatments as there was no K application in any of the treatments. An increase in soil N and P increased the plant N and P uptake respectively. Using relationships of different variables, principal component (PC) analysis technique was used for assessing the efficiency of treatments. In all the treatments, five PCs were found significant that explained the variability in the data of variables. The PC model of 25 kg N (FYM) + 25 kg N (urea) + 25 kg P ha-1 explained maximum variability of 79.6% compared to other treatments. The treatment-wise PC scores were determined and used in developing yield prediction models and measurement of sustainability yield index (SYI). The SYI ranged from 44.4% in control to 72.7% in 25 kg N (FYM) + 25 kg N (urea) + 25 kg P ha-1, which attained a mean cotton yield of 805 kg ha-1 over years. Application of 25 kg N (FYM) + 25 kg N (urea) + 25 kg P ha-1 was significantly superior in recording maximum rainwater-use efficiency (1.13 kg ha-1 mm-1) and SYI (30.5%). This treatment also gave maximum gross returns of Rs. 30272 ha-1 with benefit-cost ratio of 1.60 and maintained maximum organic carbon and available N, P, and K in soil over years. These findings are extendable to cotton grown under similar soil and agroclimatic conditions in any part of the world. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Ladda K.C.,All India Coordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture | Ladda K.C.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Maruthi Sankar G.R.,All India Coordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture | Maruthi Sankar G.R.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Agrometeorology | Year: 2010

Based on field experiments conducted during 1998 to 2006 in a semi-arid vertisol at Arjia on maize and blackgram crop an attempt was made to assess the effect of rainfall received during June to September and the soil moisture at the times of sowing and harvest on the biological yield. The study was conducted in 3 blocks of maize, blackgram and maize + blackgram by superimposing 9 fertilizer treatments. The soil moisture at sowing and harvest and biological yield attained by treatments differed significantly based on ANOVA in different years. The treatment-wise regression models of yield through rainfall of June to September and soil moisture at sowing and harvest had a predictability of 0.62 to 0.98 in maize block, 0.73 to 0.98 in blackgram block and 0.54 to 0.98 in maize + blackgram block.


Neog P.,Assam Agricultural University | Sarma P.K.,All India Coordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture | Ravindra Chary G.,Indian Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture | Dutta S.,Assam University | And 8 more authors.
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2016

Flash floods are a recurrent phenomenon in the North Bank Plains Zone (NBPZ) of Assam, India, causing wide spread damage to rice (Oryza sativa L.) crop growing during Kharif season. Therefore, it is imperative to identify indigenous technical knowledge and integrate this with mainstream technologies, Maguri and not only to enable more effective ways of coping with such extreme events but also to enhance the adaptive capacity of small-scale local farmers of the NBPZ. Identifying and evaluating traditional crop varieties in the NBPZ that are flood tolerant is one approach that may help manage weather hazards and build climate resilient agricultural systems. This research represents investigations on more flood-resistant local rice varieties. In 2013 and 2014, participatory on-farm trials were conducted in Ganakdoloni village, a community in NBPZ affected by flash floods. Thirty sites covering 20 ha were selected to evaluate the performance of five traditional floating rice (bao) varieties: Kekua, Tulshi, Dhushuri, Bahadur Rangabao. In both the years, the rice fields were affected by flooding multiple times, to a depth of up to 173 cm. The rice varieties recommended for normal, submergence and deep water situations could not perform well and were damaged extensively. The traditional rice varieties generally growing in deep water situations, however, endured the flash floods, performing better and producing grain yields from 1628 to 3000 kg ha-1. Amongst these traditional varieties, Dhushuri recorded the highest grain yield in both the years. © 2016, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved.

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