Winston Salem, NC, United States
Winston Salem, NC, United States

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Feng P.,Hubei University of Education | Feng P.,CAS Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversation | Feng P.,Algaen Corporation | Deng Z.,Hubei University of Education | And 4 more authors.
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2014

To evaluate the potential of Chlorococcum pamirum for producing biodiesel, the effects of nitrogen, phosphate, initial cell concentrations and NaCl on lipid accumulation and growth were studied. The highest specific growth rate (μmax), biomass productivity and lipid content achieved was 1.888d-1, 350.1mgL-1day-1, and 64.9%, respectively. Under nitrogen-deficient condition, the cells accumulated lipids faster at low initial cell concentration. Additional NaCl to nitrogen-deficient media accelerated the lipid accumulation. When adding 10gL-1 NaCl to nitrogen-deficient media, the lipid content and productivity of cells cultured outdoors with high initial cell concentration increased from 38.2% and 153mgL-1day-1 to 54.3% and 192mgL-1day-1 respectively. Moreover, NaCl enhanced the saturated fatty acids content from 56.40% to 73.41% of total fatty acids. The results show that C. pamirum is a promising organism for biofuel production. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Feng P.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology | Feng P.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Feng P.,Algaen Corporation | Deng Z.,Hubei Engineering University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering | Year: 2012

To evaluate the potential of the green agla Chlorella zofingiensis as a feedstock for biodiesel production, the effects of nitrogen and phosphate on lipid accumulation and growth of C. zofingiensis were studied. The maximum specific growth rate (μmax) reached 2.15 day-1 when the concentration of NaNO3 and K2HPO4·3H2O was 1.0 g L-1 and 0.01 g L-1, respectively. The lipid contents of C. zofingiensis grown in media deficient of nitrogen (65.1%) or phosphate (44.7%) were both higher than that obtained from cells grown in full medium (33.5%). The highest lipid productivity (87.1 mg L-1 day-1) was also obtained from cells grown in nitrogen deficient media, indicating nitrogen deficiency was more effective than phosphate deficiency for inducing lipid accumulation in C. zofingiensis. In addition, the feasibility of cultivating the alga in 60 L flat plate photobioreactors and 10 L bottles outdoors for biodiesel was also tested. It was found that C. zofingiensis could adapt to fluctuating temperatures and irradiance of outdoors and the highest μmax and lipid productivity could reach 0.362 day-1 and 26.6 mg L-1 day-1 outdoors, respectively. The lipid production potential of C. zofingiensis is projected to be 31.1 kg ha-1 day-1 in outdoor culture. These results suggested that C. zofingiensis is a promising organism for feedstock production of biofuel and can be used in scaled up culture outdoors. © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.


Feng P.,CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology | Feng P.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Feng P.,Algaen Corporation | Deng Z.,Hubei Engineering University | And 3 more authors.
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2011

Culturing microalgae using natural sunlight is an effective way to reduce the cost of microalgae-based biodiesel production. In order to evaluate the feasibility of culturing Chlorella zofingiensis outdoors for biodiesel production, effects of nitrogen limitation and initial cell concentration on growth and lipid accumulation of this alga were investigated in 60L flat plate photobioreactors outdoors. The highest μ max and biomass productivity obtained was 0.994day -1 and 58.4mgL -1day -1, respectively. The lipid content was much higher (54.5% of dry weight) under nitrogen limiting condition than under nitrogen sufficient condition (27.3%). With the increasing initial cell concentrations, the lipid contents declined, while lipid concentrations and productivities increased. The highest lipid content, lipid concentration, and lipid productivity obtained was 54.5%, 536mgL -1 and 22.3mgL -1day -1, respectively. This study demonstrated that it was possible to culture C. zofingiensis under outdoor conditions for producing biodiesel feedstock. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Hubei University of Education, CAS Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversation, Algaen Corporation and CAS Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology
Type: | Journal: Bioresource technology | Year: 2014

To evaluate the potential of Chlorococcum pamirum for producing biodiesel, the effects of nitrogen, phosphate, initial cell concentrations and NaCl on lipid accumulation and growth were studied. The highest specific growth rate ((max)), biomass productivity and lipid content achieved was 1.888 d(-1), 350.1 mg L(-1) day(-1), and 64.9%, respectively. Under nitrogen-deficient condition, the cells accumulated lipids faster at low initial cell concentration. Additional NaCl to nitrogen-deficient media accelerated the lipid accumulation. When adding 10 g L(-1) NaCl to nitrogen-deficient media, the lipid content and productivity of cells cultured outdoors with high initial cell concentration increased from 38.2% and 153 mg L(-1) day(-1) to 54.3% and 192 mg L(-1) day(-1) respectively. Moreover, NaCl enhanced the saturated fatty acids content from 56.40% to 73.41% of total fatty acids. The results show that C. pamirum is a promising organism for biofuel production.


Trademark
Algaen Corporation | Date: 2011-09-06

Raw AlgaBerry, Acidified AlgaBerry, Dried AlgaBerry powder, Processed AlgaBerry.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.97K | Year: 2010

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I Project aims at developing an advanced biotechnology for bioremediation of animal wastewater by using oil-rich microalgae. Rapid growing animal farming industries (hog, poultry, cattle, and dairy) have generated tremendous amount of animal wastes that have become important sources for environmental pollution. Current method of disposing untreated animal manure to cropland has caused severe problems in water & air quality in many parts of the United States. We propose to solve this problem by using oil-rich microalgae that can effectively remove excessive nutrients from animal wastewater, thus reducing the pollution to the water sources. As a by-product of this bioremediation process, the resulting oil-rich microalgae biomass can be used for biodiesel production, providing further environmental benefits to the society. It is anticipated that suitable microalgal species will be characterized for rapid removal of nitrogen & phosphorus from hog wastewater and for microalgal oil accumulation. Moreover, flat-plate photobioreactors will be tested to demonstrate the feasibility of mass cultivation of the selected species. With the successful completion of this Phase I project, the feasibility of using oil-rich microalgae for concurrent bioremediation of animal wastewater and production of biodiesel will be demonstrated. Such microalgae-based biotechnology is environment-friendly, and can improve recovery of waste materials, and reduce negative environmental impacts of the animal wastes. It can also improve the environment in rural communities because it addresses the water and air pollution problems created by the animal farms in the rural area. In addition, this technology addresses the needs of the U.S. for renewable energy, which is playing an increasing role in energy security, economical development, and environmental protection in this country. Our long-term goal is to establish an environmentally friendly, economically viable, and commercially profitable enterprise that focuses on the bioremediation of animal waste and simultaneous production of biodiesel as a by-product.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.89K | Year: 2016

The cardiovascular benefits of fish oil enriched in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are well-documented. When combined with gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), n-3 PUFAs have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic inflammatory disorders, such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the consumption of fish oil remains low in the American population. A natural alternative to fish oil that could supplement the intake of n-3 PUFA is predicted to reduce the overall incidence in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and inflammatory disorders. A marine coccolithophorid microalga Pleurochrysis carterae has been identified as the promising alternative source of PUFAs because it contains a unique fatty acids profile , which make this alga an ideal candidate for simultaneous production of multiple PUFAs as human food supplements. This project aims at demonstrating the feasibility of large scale cultivation of P. carterae to produce multiple PUFAs for human consumption to combat CVD and inflammatory disorders. The project objectives focus on developing large scale Modular Flat Plate Photobioreactors for commercial cultivation of this organism, and demonstrating the safety of the PUFAs from the P. carterae for human consumption.The positive results of these studies should be immediately translatable to the fight against CVD and inflammatory disorders in the American population. The successful completion of this project will enable us to establish a commercially viable microalgae biotechnology for production of PUFAs, which is targeted at the multi-billion dollar market of fish oil.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.89K | Year: 2009

The crude oil will be depleted within 40 years, alternative fuels have to be developed to drive our transportation systems, and biodiesel appears to be the most promising fuel of the future. Biodiesel is renewable, non-toxic, and biodegradable, it can be used in existing diesel engines without modifying the engin, and can be blended in at any ratio with petroleum diesel. However, the development of biodiesel industry is severely limited by the supply of feedstock, namely soybean oil and canola oil. Due to limitation of available agriculture land and irrigation water supply, the production of these oil crops can not sustain the biodiesel production, other sources of plant oil have to be developed as feedstock for biodiesel. Microalgae are known to exhibit 10- to 20-fold higher growth rates than agricultural crop plants, and certain microalgal species can accumulate large amounts of lipids or oil (30-60% of dry weight). As a result, the concept of using microalgae as an alternative source of feedstock for biodiesel production was intensively studied in the past 40 years. However, the past research & development efforts have led to a conclusion that microalgae-based biodiesel was not economically viable because of high production cost. Such failure to develop a commercially viable microalgae-based biodiesel production system was largely due to the lack of cost-effective photobioreactors and efficient method for oil extraction from algae. In this SBIR project, we will demonstrate the feasibility of reducing the cost of using oil-rich green algae as feedstock for biodiesel production. We intend to optimize culture conditions for microalgal oil production in our proprietary photobioreactors. The feasibility of using innovative nano-materials for algal oil extraction will be demonstrated. The combined advantages from both improvements will enable use to reduce the overall cost in microalgal oil production. The results obtained from this Phase I project will provide a solid base for us to pursue a Phase II project, in which cost-effective production of microalgae-based oil will be demonstrated in pilot scale. The long-term goal of this project is to establish an environmentally sound, commercially feasible and economically profitable engineered process for commercial production of microalgae-based biodiesel. The successful completion of this project will lead to establishment of microalgae-based biodiesel production facilities, absorpton of atmospheric carbon dioxide by microalgae, and job creation/economical development in clean energy sector.

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