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Dasopoulou M.,General District Hospital Alexandra | Briana D.D.,General District Hospital Alexandra | Boutsikou T.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Karakasidou E.,Panteion University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition | Year: 2015

Background: Gut hormones play an important role in the adaptation of the immature neonatal gut, and their secretion may be modulated by prebiotics. Furthermore, prebiotics are well known for their hypolipidemic potentials. We tested the hypothesis that prebiotics could alter motilin and gastrin secretion and reduce lipids in healthy preterms. Methods: A total of 167 newborns were randomized to either a prebiotics enriched formula containing dietary oligosaccharides (short-chain galacto-oligo-saccharides/long-chain fructo-oligo-saccharides [scGOS/lcFOS]), at a concentration of 0.8 g/100 ml, or a common preterm formula. Day 1 and 16 basal motilin, gastrin concentrations, and lipids were evaluated together with growth parameters, gastric residue, bowel habits, and feeding tolerance. Adverse events including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and septicemia were also recorded. Results: Mean motilin increase and day 16 mean values were greater for the intervention, compared with the control group (P =.001, P =.005, respectively), while gastrin remained high in both groups. Mean cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) increase were significantly greater in the control, compared with the intervention (P =.037, and P =.001) group. Day 16 LDL levels were significantly higher in the control group. Mean weight was increased in the control group, while gastric residue was less and stool frequency was increased in the intervention group. NEC and septicemia were not statistically different between groups. Conclusion: A prebiotics enriched formula resulted in significant surge of motilin relating to reduced gastric residue, compared with a common preterm formula. Mean cholesterol change was lower, while LDL was not increased in the prebiotics group, compared with the control group. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.


PubMed | Panteion University, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and General District Hospital Alexandra
Type: Journal Article | Journal: JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition | Year: 2015

Gut hormones play an important role in the adaptation of the immature neonatal gut, and their secretion may be modulated by prebiotics. Furthermore, prebiotics are well known for their hypolipidemic potentials. We tested the hypothesis that prebiotics could alter motilin and gastrin secretion and reduce lipids in healthy preterms.A total of 167 newborns were randomized to either a prebiotics enriched formula containing dietary oligosaccharides (short-chain galacto-oligo-saccharides/long-chain fructo-oligo-saccharides [scGOS/lcFOS]), at a concentration of 0.8 g/100 ml, or a common preterm formula. Day 1 and 16 basal motilin, gastrin concentrations, and lipids were evaluated together with growth parameters, gastric residue, bowel habits, and feeding tolerance. Adverse events including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and septicemia were also recorded.Mean motilin increase and day 16 mean values were greater for the intervention, compared with the control group (P = .001, P = .005, respectively), while gastrin remained high in both groups. Mean cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) increase were significantly greater in the control, compared with the intervention (P = .037, and P = .001) group. Day 16 LDL levels were significantly higher in the control group. Mean weight was increased in the control group, while gastric residue was less and stool frequency was increased in the intervention group. NEC and septicemia were not statistically different between groups.A prebiotics enriched formula resulted in significant surge of motilin relating to reduced gastric residue, compared with a common preterm formula. Mean cholesterol change was lower, while LDL was not increased in the prebiotics group, compared with the control group.

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