Windsor, United Kingdom
Windsor, United Kingdom

Aldous Leonard Huxley was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family.He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Mid career and later, he published travel writing, film stories and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the US, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death. In 1962, a year before his death, he was elected Companion of Literature by the Royal Society of Literature.Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist. Huxley later became interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism, in particular, Universalism. By the end of his life, Huxley was widely acknowledged as one of the pre-eminent intellectuals of his time. Wikipedia.


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PubMed | University of Western Australia, Aldous, Marine Science Program, Grande Rio University and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Royal Society open science | Year: 2016

We examined the effect of artificial light on the near shore trajectories of turtle hatchlings dispersing from natal beaches. Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchlings were tagged with miniature acoustic transmitters and their movements tracked within an underwater array of 36 acoustic receivers placed in the near shore zone. A total of 40 hatchlings were tracked, 20 of which were subjected to artificial light during their transit of the array. At the same time, we measured current speed and direction, which were highly variable within and between experimental nights and treatments. Artificial lighting affected hatchling behaviour, with 88% of individual trajectories oriented towards the light and spending, on average, 23% more time in the 2.25ha tracking array (19.55min) than under ambient light conditions (15.85min). Current speed had little to no effect on the bearing (angular direction) of the hatchling tracks when artificial light was present, but under ambient conditions it influenced the bearing of the tracks when current direction was offshore and above speeds of approximately 32.5cms(-1). This is the first experimental evidence that wild turtle hatchlings are attracted to artificial light after entering the ocean, a behaviour that is likely to subject them to greater risk of predation. The experimental protocol described in this study can be used to assess the effect of anthropogenic (light pollution, noise, etc.) and natural (wave action, current, wind, moonlight) influences on the in-water movements of sea turtle hatchlings during the early phase of dispersal.


Hasanien A.A.,University of California at San Francisco | Hasanien A.A.,University of Jordan | Drew B.J.,Aldous | Drew B.J.,University of California at San Francisco | Howie-Esquivel J.,University of California at San Francisco
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing | Year: 2014

Background: Sympathetic hyperactivity is linked with several adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Sympathetic activity increases early in the process of ischemia through 2 mechanisms. One originates from the central nervous system and leads to enhanced sympathetic activity. The other mechanism originates at the infarct zone and leads to B receptor up-regulation and catecholamine supersensitivity. Nevertheless, sympathetic hyperactivity accompanied by an underlying myocardial structural damage is likely to increase the ventricular repolarization duration measured as QT interval on the body surface electrocardiogram. Purpose: The aims of the current review of the literature were to examine the physiological processes underlying the use of long QT interval as a risk prediction tool in patients with ACS and to critically review and critique the existing evidence related to this matter. Conclusion: The available evidence is contradictory and includes serious limitations in design and QT measurement and correction. Until accurate and reliable data are available, it is difficult to determine the additional clinical value and prognostic significance of long QT interval in patients with ACS beyond that in other patients. Clinical Implications: Long QT interval is not uncommon among patients with ACS. Automated continuous QT interval monitoring is superior to manual QT interval measurement with the standard 10-second electrocardiogram. Optimum care for patients with ACS requires nurses to keep monitoring the QT interval several days after the initial event. Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health.


Thums M.,University of Western Australia | Thums M.,Australian Institute of Marine Science | Whiting S.D.,Marine Science Program | Reisser J.W.,University of Western Australia | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology | Year: 2013

Understanding the movements of turtle hatchings is essential for improved understanding of dispersal behaviour and ultimately survivorship, life history strategies and population connectivity. Yet investigation of in-water movement has been hampered by the small size of hatchlings relative to the size of available tracking technologies. This has resulted in the use of labour intensive visual tracking methods, or active tracking methods with high transmitter to body weight ratios. These methods are confounded by the presence of the observer, the size of the tag, usual small treatment sample sizes and studies that are constrained to daylight hours when turtles hatch predominantly at night. Passive acoustic monitoring using new miniature tags can overcome these limitations.We tested the effectiveness of active and passive acoustic tracking in monitoring turtle hatchling movement in order to measure the influence of artificial light on newly hatched turtles once they enter the water. A Vemco VR2W Positioning System (VPS) comprising an array of 18 VR2W receivers was deployed in the surf zone to detect signals from acoustic-coded transmitters (1.14 ± 0.06% of body mass) attached to 26 flatback turtle hatchlings released into the array. A total of 1328 detections were recorded for 22 hatchlings with turtles spending a mean of 16.63 ± 5.89. min in the array. The test detection range for this technology in the surf-zone was 50-100. m and was influenced by wave noise and shallow deployment. Cyclonic conditions hampered the experiment and resulted in an inconclusive test of light effects. Three additional instrumented flatback hatchlings were followed in a small boat using a mobile acoustic receiver and directional hydrophone up to 2. km from shore. Passive acoustic monitoring is a viable technology for tracking small marine animals and removes many of the confounding effects of other telemetry methods. It has great potential to examine natural and anthropogenic factors influencing orientation and behaviour during a crucial stage in turtle life history - their initial movement from the beach through predator-rich, near shore waters. While the data obtained by passive acoustic monitoring is limited in its spatio-temporal coverage, being constrained by the size of the array, active acoustic tracking can be applied over larger scales. Such studies will be particularly important for assessing the impacts of anthropogenic pressures that have changed the natural light, noise or wave environments and for providing behavioural data to improve and validate bio-physical models of the migration and dispersal of young turtles. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Pendoley K.L.,Aldous | Bell C.D.,Aldous | McCracken R.,Aldous | Ball K.R.,Aldous | And 5 more authors.
Endangered Species Research | Year: 2014

In contrast to the circumglobal nesting distributions and well-described reproductive biology of most marine turtle species, all known records of flatback turtle Natator depressus nesting have occurred within Australia and are relatively underreported; the species is listed as 'Data Deficient' by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). We report important baseline data on the breeding biology of flatback turtles at 3 rookeries in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, an area subject to increasing coastal development due to rapid expansion of the resources sector. Barrow Island and Mundabullangana support substantial reproductive populations; over the 6 season sampling period from 2005/06 to 2010/11, ~4000 and ~3500 turtles were tagged at each location, respectively. Over 2 seasons of monitoring in 2009/10 and 2011/12 at Cemetery Beach, a smaller rookery in Port Hedland, ~350 flatback turtles were tagged. We detected variation in parameters of reproductive biology between island and mainland rookeries. Mean remigration interval at Barrow Island (1.9 yr) was significantly shorter than at mainland Mundabullangana (2.2 yr) and may reflect differences in location and characteristics of remote foraging habitats in turtles returning to mainland versus offshore rookeries. Clutch size was similar (~47 eggs) among rookeries and smaller than mean clutch sizes recorded for all other Australian flatback rookeries (~53 eggs). Hatching success at Barrow Island (83.4%) was within the reported range for the species; however, at Mundabullangana and Cemetery Beach (68.2% and 57.3%, respectively) these values were the lowest published to date for this species and may be attributable to higher temperatures at mainland rookeries. © Inter-Research 2014.


News Article | September 10, 2015
Site: observer.com

Like every kid, I was forced to read Fahrenheit 451 in high school. If you’d asked me what it was about before last week, I would have told you: “Firemen who burn books.” And if you’d asked me why on earth they did that, I would have answered just as confidently: “Because a tyrannical government wanted them to.” There is a trend afoot to conveniently remember the works of authors like Ray Bradbury and Aldous Huxley as warnings against distant totalitarianism and control. But this only scratches the surface of what these books are about. Earlier this year a community college student in San Bernardino protested being required to read a Neil Gaiman graphic novel in one of her classes. It was too graphic, apparently. Her father—who does not seem to understand that his daughter is a separate human being (an adult one no less)—told The Los Angeles Times, “If they [had] put a disclaimer on this, we wouldn’t have taken the course.” A mom in Tennessee has complained that the gynecological information in the book in the bestselling nonfiction science book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, is too pornographic for her 10th grade son. While these conservative complaints about the content of books is unfortunately as old as time. We’re also seeing surge in a different type. A Rutgers student has proposed putting trigger warnings on The Great Gatsby. Robin Thicke’s song “Blurred Lines” was banned on many college campuses for promoting rape. Last year, Wellesley students created a petition to remove an art project featuring a lifelike statue of a sleepwalking man in his underwear in the snow because it caused “undue stress.” Controversial speakers (many conservative) have been blocked from speaking at college commencements. Pick up artists—never convicted of any crime—have had their visas revoked due to trending Twitter hashtags. In August, Jezebel ran the headline “Holy Shit, Who Thought This Nazi Romance Novel Was a Good Idea?” I remember thinking, “Um, probably the fucking writer who spent a lot of time writing it.” Whether they succeeded at making anything good, I cannot say, but should they be shamed for trying? It’s not as if there aren’t good books of Nazi love stories. In fact, there is one called The Reader! The people in these examples are certainly a bit ridiculous—but by no means bad. None of them see themselves as censors, naturally. They were being sensitive, outraged, protective or triggered. And to be fair, most of their complaints and protests stop short of actually saying “This should not be allowed anywhere.” But that distinction matters less than they think. Let’s go back to 451, which I found myself re-reading recently. It begins with Guy Montag burning a house that contained books. Why? How did it come to be that firemen burned books instead of putting out fires as they always had? The firemen have been doing it for so long they have no idea. Most of them have never even read a book. Except one fireman—Captain Beatty—who has been around long enough to remember what life was like before. As Montag begins to doubt his profession—going as far as to hide a book in his house—he is subjected to a speech from Beatty. In it Beatty explains that it wasn’t the government that decided that books were a threat. It was his fellow citizens. “It didn’t come from the government down,” he tells him. “There was no dictum, no declaration, no censorship, to start with, no!” In fact, it was something rather simple—something that should sound very familiar. It was a desire not to offend—of an earnest notion to literally have “everyone made equal.” And it’s at the end of this speech that we get the killer passage: And before you get offended, let’s clarify what Bradbury means by minorities. He’s not talking about race. He’s talking about it in the same way that Madison and Hamilton did in the Federalist Papers. He’s speaking about small, interested groups who try to force the rest of the majority to adhere to the minority’s set of beliefs. I don’t mean to cherry pick. I see no need to pile on to college students as being particularly responsible for the “coddling of the American mind.” (Great piece, read it.) Though I do find it ironic that we require kids to read this book in high school and just a few years (or months) later, they’re leading the charge on exactly the kind of well-intentioned censorship Bradbury was talking about. I don’t mean to say that these examples come close to the kind of overt censorship that every reasonable person dreads. But I do mean to say that they come from the same place—and very alarmingly—ultimately end together in a much worse place. In the 50th anniversary edition, Bradbury includes a short afterword where he gives his thoughts on current culture. Almost as if he is speaking directly about the events above, he wrote: “There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running around with lit matches.” There’s that saying: The road to hell is paved with good intentions. When it comes to censorship, one might say that the road to thought and speech control is paved by people trying to protect other people’s feelings. It’s important to realize that today, we have a media system paid by the pageview and thus motivated with very real financial incentives to find things to be offended about—because offense and outrage are high-valence traffic triggers. We have another industry of people—some call them Social Justice Warriors—who, despite their sincerity of belief, have also managed to build huge platforms by inventing issues and conflicts which they then ride to prominence and influence. One might call both of these types Rage Profiteers. They get us riled up, they appeal to our notions of fairness and empathy—who likes to see someone else’s feelings hurt?—without any regard for what the consequences are. Of course, the real and fair solution is much less politically correct but effective. It’s to stop trying to protect people’s feelings. Your feelings are your problem, not mine—and vice versa. Real empowerment and respect is to see our fellow citizens—victims and privileged, religious and agnostic, conservative and liberal—as adults. Human beings are not automatons—ruled by drives and triggers they cannot control. On the contrary, we have the ability to decide not to be offended. We have the ability to discern intent. We have the ability to separate someone else’s actions or provocation or ignorance from our own. This is the great evolution of consciousness—it’s what separates us from the animals. What also separates us is our capacity for empathy. But how empathetic the speech we decide to use is choice for each one of us to make. Some of us are crass, some of us are considerate. Some of us find humor in everything, some of us do not. It’s important too—but those of us that believe it and live our lives by a certain sensitivity cannot bully other people into doing so too. That sort of defeats the purpose. There is a wonderful quote from Epictetus that I think of every time I see someone get terribly upset about one of these things (I try to think about it when I get upset about anything): “If someone succeeds in provoking you, realize that your mind is complicit in the provocation.” He said that some 1,900 years ago. Even then we felt that it was easier to police the outside than examine our inside. Control and discipline of one’s own reactions make for a successful person and a functioning society. I don’t think you want to live in a world where that isn’t the expectation of each of us. I don’t think you want to see the things that will need to happen when the burden of making sure everyone is happy and not offended is put on the government—or worse, a corrupt and bitter blogosphere. But that seems to be the road we’re going down. Even though we’ve been warned. Ryan Holiday is the bestselling author of Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator and two other books. He is an editor-at-large for the New York Observer and his monthly reading recommendations are found here. He currently lives in Austin, Texas.


PubMed | Aldous
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of cardiovascular nursing | Year: 2014

Sympathetic hyperactivity is linked with several adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Sympathetic activity increases early in the process of ischemia through 2 mechanisms. One originates from the central nervous system and leads to enhanced sympathetic activity. The other mechanism originates at the infarct zone and leads to B receptor up-regulation and catecholamine supersensitivity. Nevertheless, sympathetic hyperactivity accompanied by an underlying myocardial structural damage is likely to increase the ventricular repolarization duration measured as QT interval on the body surface electrocardiogram.The aims of the current review of the literature were to examine the physiological processes underlying the use of long QT interval as a risk prediction tool in patients with ACS and to critically review and critique the existing evidence related to this matter.The available evidence is contradictory and includes serious limitations in design and QT measurement and correction. Until accurate and reliable data are available, it is difficult to determine the additional clinical value and prognostic significance of long QT interval in patients with ACS beyond that in other patients.Long QT interval is not uncommon among patients with ACS. Automated continuous QT interval monitoring is superior to manual QT interval measurement with the standard 10-second electrocardiogram. Optimum care for patients with ACS requires nurses to keep monitoring the QT interval several days after the initial event.


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