Albion, MI, United States
Albion, MI, United States

Albion College is a private liberal arts college located in Albion, Michigan. Affiliated with the United Methodist Church, it was founded in 1835 and was the first private college in Michigan to have a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. Its student population during the 2013-14 academic year was approx. 1,350.The College's athletic teams are nicknamed the Britons and their colors are purple and gold. They participate in NCAA Division III and the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association .Albion College is a member of the Great Lakes Colleges Association and the Michigan Campus Compact, an organization dedicated to encouraging student volunteerism.As of 2013, Albion College was ranked No. 100 in the U.S. News & World Report list of national liberal arts colleges, and 115th in the Forbes list of America's Top Colleges, which includes universities as well as colleges. U.S. News also includes a high school counselor ranking, in which Albion placed 85th among national liberal arts colleges. Wikipedia.


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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The artwork of critically acclaimed and locally born artist Philip C. Curtis will be on display at Spring Arbor University’s Ganton Art Gallery from February 3 to March 12. Titled “Coming Home,” this display of Curtis’ work is the most historically and artistically significant show yet received by the Ganton Art Gallery. The show includes 31 works of oil on board and 17 works on paper and furniture design. The show opens to the public on Sunday, February 5, following a private, invitation-only opening the previous Friday. The gallery will hold a Community Reception on Sunday, February 12, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. SAU Art Department lecturer in art Jonathan Rinck will deliver a lecture on the style and significance of the pieces on display. Others will be on hand to answer questions and interact with attendees. Food and drink will be provided. The event is open to the public. Visit arbor.edu/philipcurtis for directions and contact information. Philip Campbell Curtis was born May 26, 1907, in Jackson, Michigan, and received his bachelor of arts from Albion College, later attending the University of Michigan and then Yale for an art degree. During the Great Depression, Curtis served in the Work’s Progress Administration’s Federal Arts Program, which eventually relocated him to Phoenix, Arizona, and he spent the remainder of his life painting in the Phoenix area. Throughout most of his career, Curtis created paintings that were categorized as belonging to the Surrealist or Magic Realist movements, though he reportedly disdained such labels. He died on November 12, 2000. Today, his work can be found in the Smithsonian’s American Art Museum, the Phoenix Art Museum, and in numerous art museums and private collections around the nation.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

On a daily basis, Xcelerate Nike Lacrosse Camps challenge campers in a positive, respectful, and fun-filled summer camp environment, enabling them to build confidence, experience success, and showcase their newfound skills. "Xcelerate offers a variety of camp programs that will get you closer to your goal. We start with the fundamentals and build from there," says Steve Anderson, Founder of Xcelerate Lacrosse. "At the end of the camp our goal is for each camper to walk away with a higher lacrosse IQ, an enhanced skill set, new role models, new friends, and a true love of the game. Our small-group training gives in-depth instruction on offensive, defensive and team strategy." Jay Card - Coach Card has a wealth of experience having been a collegiate player, professional player and as a camp director for Xcelerate over the last 5 years. Coach Card will be directing camp at Auburn University (AL), North Central College (IL), St. Olaf College (MN), UNC Charlotte (NC), Baldwin Wallace University (OH), Vanderbilt University (TN) and Pacific Lutheran University (WA). Malcolm Chase - Coach Chase has a wealth of experience having been a collegiate player & coach, professional player and as a camp director for Xcelerate over the last 12 years. Coach chase will be directing camp in Vail (CO), Oregon State University (OR) and Southwestern University (TX). Dan Coates - Team Captain of the NLL’s Colorado Mammoth, Coates is also a Gold Medal winner for Team Canada in the World Lacrosse Championships. Coach Coates will be directing camp at Northern Kentucky University (KY), University at Buffalo (NY), Baldwin Wallace University (OH) and the University of South Carolina (SC). Jacob DeCola - Coach DeCola came to Albion College in 2009 to begin the varsity lacrosse program. Under his leadership, the Britons have built a Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association champion in just six seasons. Coach DeCola will be directing camp at Albion College (MI). Jesse King - As a professional player in both the MLL and NLL, Coach King has a wealth of experience and is excited to lead the Xcelerate Nike staff in 2017. Coach King will be directing camp at Emory University (GA), Saint Louis University (MO), Oregon State University (OR) and Pacific Lutheran University (WA). Brian Lalley - Coach Lalley has a wealth of experience having been a collegiate player at Ohio State University, a college coach at Canisus College and as a camp director for Xcelerate over the last 3 years. Coach Lalley will be directing camp at Northern Kentucky University (KY), William Jewell College (MO), University at Buffalo (NY), Baldwin Wallace University (OH) and the University of South Carolina (SC). Jason Rife - Coach Rife brings an abundance of coaching experience that features more than 15 years of coaching at the collegiate level. Coach Rife will be directing camp at North Central College (IL) and Vanderbilt University (TN). Unlike tournaments, Xcelerate's summer camp opportunities provide youth and high school lacrosse players a balance of traditional and progressive drills which lead to tangible results. For more information visit http://www.xceleratelacrosse.com or call 1-800-645-3226 Xcelerate Nike Lacrosse Camps provide players of all positions and skill levels an opportunity to learn from some of the best coaches and players in the game today. Unlike tournaments, Xcelerate's summer camp opportunities provide youth and high school lacrosse players a balance of traditional and progressive drills which lead to tangible results. US Sports Camps (USSC), headquartered in San Rafael, California, is America's largest sports camp network and the licensed operator of Nike Sports Camps. The company has offered summer camps since 1975 with the same mission that defines it today: to shape a lifelong enjoyment of athletics through high quality sports education and skill enhancement.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Xcelerate Lacrosse is offering the first 20 registered campers at each location a free Nike Vapor 2.0 Head. Xcelerate Nike Lacrosse Camps provide players of all positions and skill levels an opportunity to learn from some of the best coaches and players in the game today. Xcelerate's innovative curriculum and balanced approach to the game has made them the leader in lacrosse instruction throughout the nation. On a daily basis, coaches challenge campers in a positive, respectful, and fun-filled summer camp environment, enabling them to build confidence, experience success, and showcase their newfound skills. At the end of the week, campers walk away from any Xcelerate Nike Lacrosse Camp with a higher lacrosse IQ, an enhanced skill set, new friends, and a true love of the game. “Xcelerate Nike Lacrosse Camps provide campers the opportunity to learn from some of the most respected coaches in the nation,” says Steve Anderson, Founder of Xcelerate Lacrosse. “We provide a nice balance of experienced senior staff members, highly skilled professional players, enthusiastic recent college graduates, and current college players. Their coaching credentials are outstanding: All-Pros, All-Americans, Hall of Famers, Coaches of the Year, and All-World players.” Overnight Lacrosse Camp locations include: Auburn, AL (Auburn University); Vail, CO (Vail Mountain Lodge); Atlanta, GA (Emory University); Naperville, IL (North Central College); Highland Heights, KY (Northern Kentucky University); Albion, MI (Albion College); Northfield, MN (St. Olaf College); Liberty, MO (William Jewell College); St. Louis, MO (Saint Louis University); Amherst, NY(University at Buffalo); Charlotte, NC (UNC Charlotte); Cleveland, OH (Baldwin Wallace University); Corvallis, OR (Oregont State); Columbia, SC (Univeristy of South Carolina); Nashville, TN(Vanderbilt University); Georgetown, TX (Southwestern University); Tacoma, WA (Pacific Lutheran University). For additional details or to register online, visit http://www.xceleratelacrosse.com/ or call 1-800-645-3226. Xcelerate Nike Lacrosse Camps provide players of all positions and skill levels an opportunity to learn from some of the best coaches and players in the game today. Unlike tournaments, Xcelerate's summer camp opportunities provide youth and high school lacrosse players a balance of traditional and progressive drills which lead to tangible results. About US Sports Camps, Inc. US Sports Camps (USSC), headquartered in San Rafael, California, is America’s largest sports camp network and the licensed operator of Nike Sports Camps. Over 80,000 kids attended a US Sports Camps program in 2016. The company has offered summer camps since 1975 with the same mission that defines it today: to shape a lifelong enjoyment of athletics through high quality sports education and skill enhancement.


Smellie J.L.,University of Leicester | Wilch T.I.,Albion College | Rocchi S.,University of Pisa
Geology | Year: 2013

Lava-fed deltas are extraordinarily useful indicators of fossil water (and ice) levels in glacial, marine, and lacustrine environments. Deltas fed by 'a'ā lava should be at least as common as those sourced in pāhoehoe, yet they have been rarely described. Although facies models for pāhoehoe lava-fed deltas are well established, the architecture and lithofacies of 'a'ā-fed equivalents are substantially different and have thus far largely been unrecognized. This can have profound consequences for paleoenvironmental investigations, particularly those attempting to reconstruct past ice sheets. Essential features of 'a'ā lava-fed deltas include (1) a subaerial 'a'ā lava capping unit comprising massive internal sheet lava overlain by clinkers; (2) a crudely developed subaerial to subaqueous transition (passage zone); (3) a chaotic subaqueous association of abundant lava lobes and hyaloclastite with admixed vesicular, often reddened (oxidized) lava clinkers; and (4) rare subaqueous stratification with predominantly lower dips (̃10o-20o) than in deltas fed by pāhoehoe lava (̃25o-40o). We develop a generic facies model and investigate the emplacement conditions of 'a'ā lava-fed deltas in order to facilitate the recognition and environmental interpretation of these important sequence types in ancient successions. © 2013 Geological Society of America.


Li H.,Michigan State University | Mason D.E.,Albion College | Bieler T.R.,Michigan State University | Boehlert C.J.,Michigan State University | Crimp M.A.,Michigan State University
Acta Materialia | Year: 2013

A novel method for calculating the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) ratios of different deformation system types in polycrystalline non-cubic metals has been developed. The mean CRSS ratios between different deformation systems were calculated for both commercially pure (CP) Ti and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt.%) tensile deformed at ambient temperature and 455 C using an in situ scanning electron microscope-based testing technique combined with electron backscattered diffraction. It was found that the relative activity of the different deformation systems changes as a function of alloying composition and deformation temperature. Prismatic slip was the most active deformation mode for CP Ti. CP Ti exhibited a lower resistance to prismatic slip at both ambient and elevated temperatures compared with Ti-5Al-2.5Sn. For Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, prismatic slip was the most active deformation system at ambient temperature although the basal slip activity significantly increased compared to CP Ti, mostly likely due to an increased c/a ratio resulting in a closer packed basal plane. At 455 C, basal slip exhibited a lower CRSS than prismatic slip for Ti-5Al-2.5Sn. The relative activity of other deformation systems was also affected by alloying and temperature. The statistical resampling technique of bootstrapping was used to generate multiple equivalent data sets from which mean CRSS ratios between different deformation systems, and associated confidence intervals, could be deduced. It was found that the mean CRSS ratios at low and high strains varied slightly for the same testing conditions. Moreover, lesser activated slip systems resulted in relatively larger confidence intervals for the CRSS means. This variability may be attributed to a number of potential factors, including measurement errors, rotations of grains during deformation, local stress state variations, and work hardening. The analysis further suggests that awareness of the intrinsic statistical variability in CRSS ratios should be considered when formulating crystal plasticity constitutive models. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Bacterial community diversity in marine bacterioplankton assemblages were examined in 3 coastal locations along the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) using 16S rRNA gene libraries and fluorescence in situ hybridization approaches. The majority of the sequences (30%-60%) were similar to the 16S rRNA gene sequences of unknown bacteria; however, the operational taxonomic units from members of the Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were also present at the 3 GOM sites. Overall, sequence diversity was more similar between the Gulf sites of Carrabelle and Ochlockonee than between either of the Gulf sites and Apalachicola Bay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed the quantitative predominance of members of the Alphaproteobacteria subclass and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster within the bacterioplankton assemblages. In general, the study further reveals the presence of many bacterial taxa that have been previously found to be dominant in coastal marine environments. Differences observed in the representation of the various bacterial phylogenetic groups among the GOM coastal sites could be partly attributed to dynamic variations in several site-specific conditions, including intermittent tidal events, nutrient availability, and anthropogenic influences.


The diel change in abundance and community diversity of the bacterioplankton assemblages within the Pacific Ocean at a fixed location in Monterey Bay, California (USA) were examined with several culture-independent (i. e., nucleic acid staining, fluorescence in situ hybridization {FISH}, and 16S ribosomal RNA gene libraries) approaches over a tidal cycle. FISH analyses revealed the quantitative predominance of bacterial members belonging to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster as well as two Proteobacteria (α- and γ-) subclasses within the bacterioplankton assemblages, especially during high tide (HT) and outgoing tide (OT) than the other tidal events. While the clone libraries showed that majority of the sequences were similar to the 16S rRNA gene sequences of unknown bacteria (32% to 73%), however, the operational taxonomic units from members of the α-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria were also well represented during the four tidal events examined. Comparatively, sequence diversity was highest in OT, lowest in low tide, and very similar between HT and incoming tide. The results indicate that the dynamics of bacterial occurrence and diversity appeared to be more pronounced during HT and OT, further indicative of the ecological importance of several environmental variables including temperature, light intensity, and nutrient availability that are also concurrently fluctuating during these tidal events in marine systems. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Spherical viruses are remarkably well characterized by the Triangulation (T) number developed by Casper and Klug. The T-number specifies how many viral capsid proteins are required to cover the virus, as well as how they are further subdivided into pentamer and hexamer subunits. The T-number however does not constrain the orientations of these proteins within the subunits or dictate where the proteins should place their protruding features. These protrusions often take the form of loops, spires and helices, and are significant because they aid in stability of the capsid as well as recognition by the host organism. Until now there has be no overall understanding of the placement of protrusions for spherical viruses, other than they have icosahedral symmetry. We constructed a set of gauge points based upon the work affine extensions of Keef and Twarock, which have fixed relative angular locations with which to measure the locations of these features. This work adds a new element to our understanding of the geometric arrangement of spherical viral capsid proteins; chiefly that the locations of protruding features are not found stochastically distributed in an icosahedral manner across the viral surface, but instead these features are found only in specific locations along the 15 icosahedral great circles. We have found that this result holds true as the T number and viral capsids size increases, suggesting an underlying geometric constraint on their locations. This is in spite of the fact that the constraints on the pentamers and hexamer orientations change as a function of T-number, as you need to accommodate more hexamers in the same solid angle between pentamers. The existence of this angular constraint of viral capsids suggests that there is a fitness or energetic benefit to the virus placing its protrusions in this manner. This discovery may have profound impacts on identifying and eliminating viral pathogens, understanding evolutionary constraints as well as bioengineering for capsid drug delivery systems. This result also suggests that in addition to biochemical attachment restrictions, there are additional geometric constraints that should be adhered to when modifying protein capsids. © 2016 David P. Wilson. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: PLANETARY ASTRONOMY | Award Amount: 108.01K | Year: 2010

In this project, the PI will conduct laboratory measurements of the ages and chemical compositions of lunar impact glass samples obtained by the Apollo astronauts. At least 30 samples will be analyzed, using X-ray spectroscopy to determine the abundances of silicon, titanium, aluminum, chromium, iron, manganese, magnesium, calcium, sodium, and potassium, and using the laser step-heating argon-40/argon-39 method to determine the age. By combining chronological and geochemical data, the PI plans to constrain the number and distribution of impacts that formed the impact glasses found at each Apollo landing site, and thereby elucidate the impact history of the Moon. She will assess the evidence for a large impact or increased rate of impacts 800 million years ago, and examine whether lunar impacts can be associated with terrestrial mass extinctions. Conducting this research at an undergraduate institution, the PI will train undergraduate students in geochemical laboratory techniques and the use of extraterrestrial samples.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: PLANETARY ASTRONOMY | Award Amount: 193.61K | Year: 2015

The appearance of abundant craters on the Moon makes it clear that objects from the outer Solar System have bombarded objects in the inner Solar System over time. Bombardment by large objects may have had fundamental effects on our Earth, including possibly bringing the molecules that are necessary for life. On Earth, it is rare to see the evidence of these impacts because of the constant changes to its surface due to geological (e.g. earthquakes and volcanic eruptions) and meteorological (e.g. wind and rain) processes. However, the Moon, due to its nearness to Earth, serves as a good substitute for understanding terrestrial impact events. But the timing of impacts on the Moon over the last 4500 million years is not well understood. This study will examine samples of lunar material affected by the bombardment that were brought back by the Apollo missions to try and determine how when they were formed and what they are made of. This will help us determine what kinds of objects hit the earth, and when, potentially providing insights into their influence on Earths evolution.

The PI resides at a predominantly undergraduate college, and will involve her students in studying the samples and their data so that they will learn how to manage and think critically about large data sets. She will also bring students to the annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference to present their results. Thus, they will develop skills that will benefit them in graduate school or the workforce, and their involvement in inquiry-based learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields achieves a key aspect of the National Science Foundations mission. Furthermore, students who work with the lunar samples and their data will become knowledgeable about extraterrestrial sample characterization and may be poised to be some of the best-prepared graduate students available to work on any samples returned from both the Moon and Mars in the next ~20 years.

The Moon provides the most clear and complete history of impact events in the inner Solar System. Bombarded since its formation ~4.5 billion years ago, the Moons impact record can be used to gain insights into how the Earth has been influenced by similar impacting events over billions of years. The timing of impacts on the Moon, however, is not well understood and has been the focus of many studies. Deciphering the lunar impact history is a complex process and lunar impact glasses, numerous in the regolith samples returned with the Apollo missions, can be used to address this issue. This study focuses on obtaining geochemical and geochronological data on lunar impact glasses, which are pieces of melted regolith (lunar dirt) created by energetic impacting events on the Moon. These impact glasses possess the composition of the target material and can be dated by the 40Ar/39Ar (argon) method in order to determine their age of formation, how long they have been exposed at the lunar surface, and the composition of the solar wind prior to the time of burial. The studys objective is to understand the ages of impact glasses, along with their compositions, in order to learn more about Solar System processes. In particular, team can begin to piece together information about the rate of impact events and their effects (if any) on Earth, as well as the changing nature (if any) of the solar wind composition.

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