Alberta Health Services CancerControl Alberta

Edmonton, Canada

Alberta Health Services CancerControl Alberta

Edmonton, Canada

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Felix A.S.,U.S. National Cancer Institute | Gaudet M.M.,Epidemiology Research Program | La Vecchia C.,University of Milan | Nagle C.M.,QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute | And 40 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Intrauterine devices (IUDs), long-acting and reversible contraceptives, induce a number of immunological and biochemical changes in the uterine environment that could affect endometrial cancer (EC) risk. We addressed this relationship through a pooled analysis of data collected in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. We combined individual-level data from 4 cohort and 14 case-control studies, in total 8,801 EC cases and 15,357 controls. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated pooled odds ratios (pooled-ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for EC risk associated with ever use, type of device, ages at first and last use, duration of use and time since last use, stratified by study and adjusted for confounders. Ever use of IUDs was inversely related to EC risk (pooled-OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.74-0.90). Compared with never use, reduced risk of EC was observed for inert IUDs (pooled-OR=0.69, 95% CI=0.58-0.82), older age at first use (≥35 years pooled-OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.43-0.67), older age at last use (≥45 years pooled-OR=0.60, 95% CI=0.50-0.72), longer duration of use (≥10 years pooled-OR=0.61, 95% CI=0.52-0.71) and recent use (within 1 year of study entry pooled-OR=0.39, 95% CI=0.30-0.49). Future studies are needed to assess the respective roles of detection biases and biologic effects related to foreign body responses in the endometrium, heavier bleeding (and increased clearance of carcinogenic cells) and localized hormonal changes. © 2014 UICC.


Chen M.M.,Harvard University | Crous-Bou M.,Harvard University | Setiawan V.W.,University of Southern California | Prescott J.,Harvard University | And 40 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Endometrial cancer (EC) contributes substantially to total burden of cancer morbidity and mortality in the United States. Family history is a known risk factor for EC, thus genetic factors may play a role in EC pathogenesis. Three previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have found only one locus associated with EC, suggesting that common variants with large effects may not contribute greatly to EC risk. Alternatively, we hypothesize that rare variants may contribute to EC risk. We conducted an exome-wide association study (EXWAS) of EC using the Infinium HumanExome BeadChip in order to identify rare variants associated with EC risk. We successfully genotyped 177,139 variants in a multiethnic population of 1,055 cases and 1,778 controls from four studies that were part of the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2). No variants reached global significance in the study, suggesting that more power is needed to detect modest associations between rare genetic variants and risk of EC. © 2014 Chen et al.


Brenner D.R.,Alberta Health Services CancerControl Alberta | Speidel T.,Alberta Health Services CancerControl Alberta | Csizmadi I.,Alberta Health Services CancerControl Alberta | Csizmadi I.,University of Calgary | And 7 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology | Year: 2015

Introduction: The evidence for a role of dietary carbohydrate intake with endometrial cancer risk is conflicting. We therefore evaluated the association between glycemic load (GL) and endometrial cancer in a population-based-case control study using a comprehensive quantitative food frequency questionnaire for the estimation of GL. Methods: Diet in the year before the reference date was assessed with the self-administered Canadian Diet History Questionnaire in 511 cases and 980 controls in Alberta, Canada between 2002 and 2006. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between GL and endometrial cancer risk, with non-linearity evaluated by the examination of cubic splines. Results: The risk for endometrial cancer did not change based on GL (for the highest versus lowest quartile, adjusted odds ratio. =. 0.87, 95% confidence interval. =. 0.52-1.46), even after the removal of participants previously diagnosed with diabetes ((diabetics n cases. =. 63, n controls. =. 55 excluded) adjusted odds ratio. =. 0.77, 95% confidence interval. =. 0.44-1.36). We observed no evidence of effect modification by Body Mass Index (BMI)(. p-interaction term. =. 0.22). Conclusions: Intake of foods eliciting a glycemic response was not associated with endometrial cancer risk in this population of Canadian women. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | University of Calgary, Public and Aboriginal Health, Alberta Health Services CancerControl Alberta, University of New Mexico and University of Alberta
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cancer epidemiology | Year: 2015

The evidence for a role of dietary carbohydrate intake with endometrial cancer risk is conflicting. We therefore evaluated the association between glycemic load (GL) and endometrial cancer in a population-based-case control study using a comprehensive quantitative food frequency questionnaire for the estimation of GL.Diet in the year before the reference date was assessed with the self-administered Canadian Diet History Questionnaire in 511 cases and 980 controls in Alberta, Canada between 2002 and 2006. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between GL and endometrial cancer risk, with non-linearity evaluated by the examination of cubic splines.The risk for endometrial cancer did not change based on GL (for the highest versus lowest quartile, adjusted odds ratio=0.87, 95% confidence interval=0.52-1.46), even after the removal of participants previously diagnosed with diabetes ((diabetics n cases=63, n controls=55 excluded) adjusted odds ratio=0.77, 95% confidence interval=0.44-1.36). We observed no evidence of effect modification by Body Mass Index (BMI)(p-interaction term=0.22).Intake of foods eliciting a glycemic response was not associated with endometrial cancer risk in this population of Canadian women.

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