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Richmond S.A.,University of Calgary | Kang J.,University of Calgary | Emery C.A.,University of Calgary | Emery C.A.,Alberta Childrens Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport | Year: 2013

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between sport injury and body mass index in adolescents (12-19 years). Design: Secondary analysis of data collected in junior and senior high school surveys in Alberta, Canada. Methods: Participants (n= 4339) included students from 59 schools. All sport injury was defined as injury reported in the past one year. Medically treated injury, as any more serious sport related injury reported in the last year that required medical attention. Overweight, obese, and healthy was defined using international cut points, as the exposure. Results: Multivariate logistic regression analysis controlling for clustering by school, and adjusting for potential risk factors was used. There was a 34% increased risk for all sport injury in obese adolescents compared to healthy adolescents [odds ratio (OR) = 1.34 (95% CI: 1.02-1.80)]. There was increased risk for all sport injury and medically treated injury with hours of participation, where the highest group had a 4-fold increase in risk (OR = 4.17, 95%CI: 2.77-6.30 and OR = 3.80, 95%CI: 2.54-5.69, respectively). There was also increased risk for both all sport injury and medically treated injury in Caucasians compared to non-Caucasians [OR = 1.45 (95%CI: 1.15-1.82), OR = 1.94 (95%CI: 1.59-2.37), respectively], as well as for club/team play compared to less elite play [OR = 1.87 (95%CI: 1.43-2.44) and OR = 2.12 (95%CI: 1.57-2.87), respectively]. Conclusions: The risk of sustaining a sport injury in obese adolescents was greater compared to those of healthy weight. There is also a greater risk with increasing hours of play, in Caucasian adolescents, and those that play at a higher sporting level. © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Source


Lazier J.,University of Calgary | Chernos J.,University of Calgary | Lowry R.B.,University of Calgary | Lowry R.B.,Alberta Childrens Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2014

Filippi syndrome is characterized by developmental delay, growth failure, cryptorchidism, bilateral hand and foot syndactyly, and facial dysmorphism. The 2q24q31 contiguous deletion syndrome has similarly been associated with hand and foot anomalies, growth retardation, microcephaly, characteristic facies with a broad prominent nasal root and thin alae nasi, and intellectual disability. We present a patient with this deletion who has a Filippi-like phenotype, which may be the first causative cytogenetic result in this syndrome. This suggests the importance of array comparative genomic hybridization in evaluation of patients with Filippi syndrome, and suggests that the inheritance may not always be autosomal recessive. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Harabor A.,University of Calgary | Soraisham A.S.,University of Calgary | Soraisham A.S.,Alberta Childrens Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health
Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine | Year: 2015

Objectives - To describe the impact of targeted neonatal echocardiography on management of neonatal illness in a tertiary perinatal center neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods - We conducted a retrospective analysis of consecutive targeted neonatal echocardiographic studies that were performed over an 18-month period in a regional perinatal center NICU in Canada. All studies were performed with a cardiovascular ultrasound machine and transducer and read on a workstation with storage and analysis software. Reporting was done on a standardized document, and any management change resulting from targeted neonatal echocardiography was documented. Results - A total of 303 consecutive targeted neonatal echocardiographic studies were performed on 129 neonates. The mean gestational age ± SD was 27.8 ± 4.3 weeks (range, 23-41 weeks), and the mean birth weight ± SD was 1196 ± 197 g (range, 490-4500 g). The median number of studies per neonate was 2 (range, 1-8), with most repeated studies for a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The most common indication for echocardiography was assessment of a PDA (52.1%), followed by early global hemodynamic assessment of very low birth weight (16.2%) and pulmonary hypertension (12.2%). Of the 303 studies, 126 (41.5%) resulted in management changes. The contribution to management was significantly related to the timing of echocardiography. Around half of the echocardiographic examinations during first the week of life resulted in management changes, compared to 22% of studies after 1 week of age (P = .002). Patent ductus arteriosus management accounted for almost half of the interventions. Conclusions - Targeted neonatal echocardiography is a valuable tool in the NICU and can contribute substantially to hemodynamic management in the first week of life, PDA management in the first 2 weeks of life, and cases of hypotension or shock at any time during the hospital stay. ©2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. Source


Kaminsky L.A.,University of Calgary | Dewey D.,University of Calgary | Dewey D.,Alberta Childrens Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health
Canadian Journal of Diabetes | Year: 2014

Objective: To examine the associations between body mass index (BMI) and physical activity with body image, self-esteem and social support in adolescents with type 1 diabetes compared to adolescents without health conditions. Methods: We studied 46 adolescents with type 1 diabetes and 27 comparison adolescents who provided self-reports of height and weight, which were used to calculate BMI z-scores. Participants also completed validated questionnaires that assessed physical activity, body image, self-esteem and social support. Results: No significant group differences were found between adolescents with type 1 diabetes and comparison adolescents in terms of BMI and physical activity. Examination of group and gender revealed that higher BMI was significantly associated with a less positive body image in girls with diabetes only. Higher BMI was associated with poorer self-esteem and lower levels of social support in adolescents with diabetes, particularly girls. Higher levels of physical activity were not associated with a more positive body image and no significant associations were found between physical activity and self-esteem or social support. Conclusions: BMI and physical activity levels of adolescents with type 1 diabetes do not differ from those of adolescents without diabetes. Higher BMI is associated with a less positive body image and poorer psychosocial outcomes, particularly in girls with diabetes. As body image concerns and various psychosocial factors could be precursors to the development of eating-disorder symptoms, future research in adolescents with diabetes with higher BMIs should examine the associations among these variables. Further, it is essential that research on body image take into account gender differences. © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Source


Kaminsky L.A.,University of Calgary | Dewey D.,University of Calgary | Dewey D.,Behavioural Research Unit | Dewey D.,Alberta Childrens Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health
Canadian Journal of Diabetes | Year: 2013

Objective: To examine eating disorder symptoms and body image in adolescents with type 1 diabetes and to investigate the associations among social support, self-esteem, health locus of control, eating disorder symptoms and body image. Methods: Forty-six adolescents with type 1 diabetes and 27 healthy comparison adolescents completed questionnaires. Results: No significant differences were identified in eating disorder symptoms and body image between adolescents with type 1 diabetes and healthy comparison adolescents. Regression analyses were completed with the full sample of adolescents with type 1 diabetes and healthy comparison adolescents. Higher levels of social support and being male were associated with a more positive body image, less body dissatisfaction and a lower drive for thinness. A belief by the adolescents that parents or healthcare providers (i.e. external powerful others locus of control) were in control of their health was associated with a more positive body image and less body dissatisfaction. Higher self-esteem was associated with a greater drive for thinness and a higher level of body dissatisfaction. Conclusions: Social support, health locus of control and self-esteem appear to be important correlates of eating disorder symptoms and body image in adolescents with diabetes and their typically developing peers. © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Source

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