Albert Schweitzer Hospital CERMEL

Lambaréné, Gabon

Albert Schweitzer Hospital CERMEL

Lambaréné, Gabon
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Dejaco D.,Innsbruck Medical University | Aregger F.C.,Innsbruck Medical University | Hurth H.V.,Innsbruck Medical University | Kegele J.,Innsbruck Medical University | And 16 more authors.
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology | Year: 2017

Objective Transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) monitor cochlear function. High pass rates have been reported for industrialized countries. Pass rates in low and middle income countries such as Sub-Saharan Africa are rare, essentially lower and available for children up to 4 years of age and frequently based on hospital recruitments. This study aims at providing additional TEOAE pass rates of a healthy Sub-Saharan cohort aged 1–10 years with data from Gabon, Ghana and Kenya. Potentially confounding factors (recruitment site, age) are taken into consideration. Methods Healthy children were recruited in hospitals, schools and kindergartens. Inclusion criteria were age 1–10 years and normal otoscopic findings. Exclusion criteria were any sickness or physical ailment potentially impairing the hearing capacity. Five measurements per ear were performed with Capella Cochlear Emission Analyzer (MADSEN, Germany). An overall wave reproducibility of above 60% served as pass-criterion. Pass rates were compared between recruitment sites and age groups (1–5 and 6–10 years). Results Overall pass rate was 87.5% (n = 264; 231 passes vs. 33 fails). Of these 84.0% of hospital recruited children passed (n = 156; 131 passes vs. 25 fails), compared to 92.6% of community recruitments (n = 108; 100 passes vs. 8 fails), which was significantly different p = 0.039). If analyzed by age groups, this difference was only observed in children younger than 6 years (p = 0.007). Conclusion Hospitals as recruitment sites for healthy controls seem to affect TEOAE pass rates. We advise for a cautious approach when recruiting healthy TEOAE control collectives under the age of 6 in a hospital setting. In children older than 6 years conventional pure-tone audiometry remains the standard method for hearing screening. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

Loading Albert Schweitzer Hospital CERMEL collaborators
Loading Albert Schweitzer Hospital CERMEL collaborators