Juneau, AK, United States
Juneau, AK, United States

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is a department within the government of Alaska. The Department of Fish and Game manages Alaska's fish, game, and aquatic plant resources. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.sej.org

"A small but dangerous parasite, the winter tick, is spreading north and west as winters become shorter and now is knocking at Alaska's border. The winter tick, which has already devastated moose populations in New England and the upper Midwest, has been confirmed in Canada's Yukon Territory and in the Northwest Territories, where it's infecting elk, mule deer and some moose. 'Now that they're moving farther north through Canada, north and west, they're eventually going to arrive here, if they're not here already,' said Kimberlee Beckmen, wildlife veterinarian for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. 'We will be next. It's only a matter of time.'"


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.intrafish.com

As of Sunday, Whole Foods Market in Seattle was carrying the coveted Copper River salmon. Social media was flaring up with posts from restaurants carrying the salmon as well: First Copper River sockeye landings just shy of forecast The numbers are in for the landings for the first Copper River opener. See what fishermen harvested and what the opening dates are for the other fishing districts in this IntraFish article. Copper River is on the menu in Seattle Although many Seattle-area retailers -- such as QFC, Safeway, Whole Foods and Metropolitan Market -- say they have not received Copper River salmon as of Friday morning, area restaurants are ready to serve the fish. Anthony's Restaurants is beginning to serve sockeye Friday and kings and sockeye on Saturday, the company's seafood buyer Tim Ferleman told IntraFish. The restaurant paid around $17 (€15) for sockeye and $23 (€20.50) for kings, he said. Elliott's Oyster House in Seattle also had Copper River salmon on the menu Friday, with king going for $58 (€51.77) and sockeye for $38 (€33.92), according to the restaurant. He beat out Spinasse and Artusi Executive Chef Stuart Lane and Wild Ginger Executive Chef David Yeo in the eighth annual competition, which used a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty Seafoods. Seattle gets its first salmon delivery Alaska Airlines landed Friday morning with 22,000 pounds of fish, including a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty Seafoods, which will be used by three Seattle chefs in the eighth annual "Copper Chef Cook-off." Alaska has four flights scheduled throughout Friday to deliver a total of 77,000 pounds of Copper River salmon to Anchorage and the lower 48. It partners with Ocean Beauty, Trident Seafoods and Copper River Seafoods. The season’s first fish, a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty became today's catch of the day. #CopperRiverSalmon pic.twitter.com/FTR8GheEw6 — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 We've got a great flight crew delivering the first #CopperRiverSalmon pic.twitter.com/bNsQW6C6K6 — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 It's a late night in Cordova as the #CopperRiverSalmon are coming off the boats. In a couple hours they'll be on our cargo plane. pic.twitter.com/sqbd83X8SL — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 IntraFish spoke to several sources in the industry to get a sampling of what prices processors were offering for the first batches of Copper River salmon. Prices this early in the season generally are not representative because of the small amount of fish harvested and the early enthusiasm for the fish. Typically, prices drop dramatically after a few openings have occurred and more fish enter the supply chain. See what the prices are in this article. Seattle won't get the first shipment of Copper River salmon this year. ACE Air Cargo beat Alaska Air with the first Copper River king salmon sent to 10th and M Seafoods, which will distribute to Anchorage restaurants Thursday night, according to KTVA news. Three groups to bring first salmon to Seattle The Copper River/Prince William Sound Marketing Association said Thursday its "fleet of 540 independent artisans" hit the waters to bring in the first Copper River salmon of the season. "We are looking forward to working with Alaska Airlines and this year's processing partner, Ocean Beauty, to celebrate the first fresh Copper River Salmon arriving in Seattle," said the organization. 500 boats left Cordova harbor yesterday to start fishing first thing this a.m. for @CopperRiverWild. First fish fly on @AlaskaAir tonight! pic.twitter.com/p7CZS4PkOe — Edible Seattle (@edibleseattle) May 18, 2017 Owned by Giant Eagle, midwestern supermarket chain Market District told customers Thursday to expect Copper River salmon soon. "Caught in Alaska and jet-shipped directly just hours after the catch, Copper River Salmon," said the retailer, which has 13 locations in western Pennsylvania and Ohio. Copper River salmon season has started! Here we go wild salmon season! #Copperriver #Salmon — Northport Fisheries (@NPDailyCatch) May 18, 2017 The weather "is pretty nice out," and "everyone is out of the harbor" fishing for the first Copper River salmon, Cordova Harbormaster Tony Schinella told IntraFish. He expects a good day of fishing and said he will start getting updates throughout the day. Today marks the opening of the Alaska salmon harvest season! RT if you're planning on making Alaska salmon for dinner tonight. pic.twitter.com/YpXghQWNIi — Alaska Seafood (@Alaska_Seafood) May 18, 2017 Gone fishing in Cordova. It's the season opener for Copper River Salmon today. Is your BBQ ready? #CopperRiverSalmon #Alaska pic.twitter.com/lLhlFC9ijD — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 18, 2017 US retailer Hy-Vee said Tuesday it plans to bring Copper River salmon to stores soon after the season kicks off and Alaskan salmon will carry the company's Responsible Choice label. "The consumer demand for this product has grown each year with foodies eagerly waiting for the first salmon to arrive in their local Hy-Vee," said the company. "The pure, pristine environment of the Copper River helps to create an omega-3 powerhouse." Will MSC label pay off for Prince William Sound salmon? It may be good short term, but 'added layer of cost associated with MSC certification remains an issue in the long term,' one analyst says. Click here to read the IntraFish story in full. Season is off to a good start already Good news for Alaska salmon harvesters -- last week the Prince William Sound region was officially certified as sustainable to the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard, bringing one of the industry's longest-running sagas to a close. The Prince William Sound fishery certification will apply to the 2017 harvest. Showers are expected in Cordova for the opening day of Copper River season, according to Weather.com. There's a 50 percent chance of precipitation, but the weather looks warm, with a high of 50 degrees Fahrenheit and a low of 41 degrees Fahrenheit. Winds are slated to come from the southeast at 10mph. The district opens May 18 for a 12-hour commercial fishing period. However, there will only be one 12-hour fishing period during the first week as opposed to the normal two periods per week. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) plans to implement more commercial fishery restrictions this season to reduce king salmon harvest. The Copper River king salmon forecast for this year is 29,000 fish, the smallest since 1985, and further evidence of a recent pattern of weak returns, said the department. However, this forecast is still more than double the 12,000 Chinook salmon landed last year. Yukon king salmon commercial fishermen were dealt some good news with word that this year's harvest could be a bumper one. See what fisheries managers at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) have to say on the upcoming season. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) set the pre-season troll treaty harvest allocation Monday for 2017 in southeast Alaska. Read more about it in this IntraFish article. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) said Monday the commercial common property fish (CCPF) harvest projections for the 2017 salmon fishery in the Prince William Sound and Copper/Bering River areas is 63.71 million salmon, more than four times the 13.7 million fish harvested in 2016. Go here for a look at the breakdown by species. Buyers: Get ready to pay a lot more for Copper River salmon Copper River is the first fishing district to open up and the commercial common property fishery (CCPF) harvest projection is 1.1 million fish, 32 percent less than last year's harvest of 1.61 million. Click here for the forecasted harvest break down and to see what ADF&G biologists had to say when they talked to IntraFish on the upcoming season. Slump in Bristol Bay sockeye harvests to hit most fishing districts The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) released detailed harvest data for the five Bristol Bay districts Tuesday projecting declines in most of the regions compared with last year's harvest. The commercial salmon season in Bristol Bay opens June 1 with a total projected sockeye harvest of 27.47 million fish. Click here to look at the projected harvests for the individual districts For more seafood news and updates, follow us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our daily newsletter.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.undercurrentnews.com

This ends a five-year period without certification for this portion of the Alaska salmon fishery, which is one of the highest producing Alaska salmon fishing regions among 14 identified by the MSC. PWS lost its certification on October 30, 2012, when it failed to receive recertification to the MSC standard. The rest of the Alaska salmon fishery has been certified since Nov. 12, 2013, Jon Corsiglia, US spokesperson for the MSC, told Undercurrent News. Alaska salmon's MSC certification dates back to 2000, but it had lapsed following major processors' decision not to continue with the program when recertification came up in October of 2012. Today's PWS recertification, classified as a "scope extension", gives PWS an MSC certificate that is equivalent to the rest of the state's salmon fishery certification, which expires November 2018, Amanda Stern-Pilot MRAG Americas, the independent assessor of the PWS's MSC recertification, told Undercurrent. PWS's recertification is subject to successful completion of annual surveillance audits, MRAG said in a release. MRAG recommended certification late last month. This was subject to a 15-day period for stakeholders to file objections, which could potentially have halted the recertification process. This period ended May 11. "No objections were received, so it is officially recertified now," Corsiglia said. According to MRAG, the certification covers purse seine, drift gillnet and set gillnet for Prince William Sound sockeye, chinook, coho, pink and chum salmon. This ends a shut-out period from the MSC for PWS that arose over concerns of the region's use of hatchery fish. During the 2013 assessment third-party certification team's determination that the PWS unit should remain in assessment pending further analysis of an Alaska Department of Fish and Game multi-year study relating to the impacts of hatcheries on the populations of wild salmon and herring in the PWS, the MSC said. According to Corsiglia, these concerns over the use of hatchery fish have been since resolved in regards to the MSC certification. "As with all fisheries, the MSC process always seeks to take new information into account," Corsiglia said. "However, with today’s certification announcement, the concern from 2013 over wild/hatchery interaction has been resolved to the satisfaction of all engaged stakeholders." According to the MSC release, the PWS unit was assessed again via a scope extension to the valid Alaska Salmon certificate in 2016. "Based upon the findings quantified by the Alaska Hatchery Research Program, the certification assessment team has determined that the impacts of wild and hatchery salmon interactions are low and meet the sustainability requirements of the MSC Fisheries Standard," the MSC said. Following its lack of recertification with the rest of the Alaska salmon fishery in 2013, the PWS region ceased to be part of the MSC certification process temporarily in April of 2015, when the Alaska Salmon Processors Association -- the organization managing Alaska salmon's MSC certification process at that time -- withdrew the PWS portion from the fishery's certification program. The decision came as major Alaska salmon processors attempted to re-join the MSC. The lack of inclusion of PWS in the Alaska salmon fishery's 2013 recertification was so contentious that it caused Copper River Seafoods to drop out of the MSC certification process. The company, however, later changed its stance and became one of the few remaining companies in the MSC certification client group. Today's list of Alaska salmon companies authorized to carry the MSC stamp on their products includes Copper River Seafoods along with a long list of large and small Alaska salmon processors. These companies are part of the client group run by the Pacific Seafood Processors Association, whose president Glenn Reed welcomed this news. "The Alaska Salmon fishery management program and its participants are committed to sustainable use of the ocean’s natural resources, a key component of our business," Reed said. "We are proud to have the MSC process again recognize the sustainability of Prince William Sound and all Alaska salmon."


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.intrafish.com

As of Sunday, Whole Foods Market in Seattle was carrying the coveted Copper River salmon. Social media was flaring up with posts from restaurants carrying the salmon as well: First Copper River sockeye landings just shy of forecast The numbers are in for the landings for the first Copper River opener. See what fishermen harvested and what the opening dates are for the other fishing districts in this IntraFish article. Copper River is on the menu in Seattle Although many Seattle-area retailers -- such as QFC, Safeway, Whole Foods and Metropolitan Market -- say they have not received Copper River salmon as of Friday morning, area restaurants are ready to serve the fish. Anthony's Restaurants is beginning to serve sockeye Friday and kings and sockeye on Saturday, the company's seafood buyer Tim Ferleman told IntraFish. The restaurant paid around $17 (€15) for sockeye and $23 (€20.50) for kings, he said. Elliott's Oyster House in Seattle also had Copper River salmon on the menu Friday, with king going for $58 (€51.77) and sockeye for $38 (€33.92), according to the restaurant. He beat out Spinasse and Artusi Executive Chef Stuart Lane and Wild Ginger Executive Chef David Yeo in the eighth annual competition, which used a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty Seafoods. Seattle gets its first salmon delivery Alaska Airlines landed Friday morning with 22,000 pounds of fish, including a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty Seafoods, which will be used by three Seattle chefs in the eighth annual "Copper Chef Cook-off." Alaska has four flights scheduled throughout Friday to deliver a total of 77,000 pounds of Copper River salmon to Anchorage and the lower 48. It partners with Ocean Beauty, Trident Seafoods and Copper River Seafoods. The season’s first fish, a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty became today's catch of the day. #CopperRiverSalmon pic.twitter.com/FTR8GheEw6 — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 We've got a great flight crew delivering the first #CopperRiverSalmon pic.twitter.com/bNsQW6C6K6 — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 It's a late night in Cordova as the #CopperRiverSalmon are coming off the boats. In a couple hours they'll be on our cargo plane. pic.twitter.com/sqbd83X8SL — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 IntraFish spoke to several sources in the industry to get a sampling of what prices processors were offering for the first batches of Copper River salmon. Prices this early in the season generally are not representative because of the small amount of fish harvested and the early enthusiasm for the fish. Typically, prices drop dramatically after a few openings have occurred and more fish enter the supply chain. See what the prices are in this article. Seattle won't get the first shipment of Copper River salmon this year. ACE Air Cargo beat Alaska Air with the first Copper River king salmon sent to 10th and M Seafoods, which will distribute to Anchorage restaurants Thursday night, according to KTVA news. Three groups to bring first salmon to Seattle The Copper River/Prince William Sound Marketing Association said Thursday its "fleet of 540 independent artisans" hit the waters to bring in the first Copper River salmon of the season. "We are looking forward to working with Alaska Airlines and this year's processing partner, Ocean Beauty, to celebrate the first fresh Copper River Salmon arriving in Seattle," said the organization. 500 boats left Cordova harbor yesterday to start fishing first thing this a.m. for @CopperRiverWild. First fish fly on @AlaskaAir tonight! pic.twitter.com/p7CZS4PkOe — Edible Seattle (@edibleseattle) May 18, 2017 Owned by Giant Eagle, midwestern supermarket chain Market District told customers Thursday to expect Copper River salmon soon. "Caught in Alaska and jet-shipped directly just hours after the catch, Copper River Salmon," said the retailer, which has 13 locations in western Pennsylvania and Ohio. Copper River salmon season has started! Here we go wild salmon season! #Copperriver #Salmon — Northport Fisheries (@NPDailyCatch) May 18, 2017 The weather "is pretty nice out," and "everyone is out of the harbor" fishing for the first Copper River salmon, Cordova Harbormaster Tony Schinella told IntraFish. He expects a good day of fishing and said he will start getting updates throughout the day. Today marks the opening of the Alaska salmon harvest season! RT if you're planning on making Alaska salmon for dinner tonight. pic.twitter.com/YpXghQWNIi — Alaska Seafood (@Alaska_Seafood) May 18, 2017 Gone fishing in Cordova. It's the season opener for Copper River Salmon today. Is your BBQ ready? #CopperRiverSalmon #Alaska pic.twitter.com/lLhlFC9ijD — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 18, 2017 US retailer Hy-Vee said Tuesday it plans to bring Copper River salmon to stores soon after the season kicks off and Alaskan salmon will carry the company's Responsible Choice label. "The consumer demand for this product has grown each year with foodies eagerly waiting for the first salmon to arrive in their local Hy-Vee," said the company. "The pure, pristine environment of the Copper River helps to create an omega-3 powerhouse." Will MSC label pay off for Prince William Sound salmon? It may be good short term, but 'added layer of cost associated with MSC certification remains an issue in the long term,' one analyst says. Click here to read the IntraFish story in full. Season is off to a good start already Good news for Alaska salmon harvesters -- last week the Prince William Sound region was officially certified as sustainable to the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard, bringing one of the industry's longest-running sagas to a close. The Prince William Sound fishery certification will apply to the 2017 harvest. Showers are expected in Cordova for the opening day of Copper River season, according to Weather.com. There's a 50 percent chance of precipitation, but the weather looks warm, with a high of 50 degrees Fahrenheit and a low of 41 degrees Fahrenheit. Winds are slated to come from the southeast at 10mph. The district opens May 18 for a 12-hour commercial fishing period. However, there will only be one 12-hour fishing period during the first week as opposed to the normal two periods per week. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) plans to implement more commercial fishery restrictions this season to reduce king salmon harvest. The Copper River king salmon forecast for this year is 29,000 fish, the smallest since 1985, and further evidence of a recent pattern of weak returns, said the department. However, this forecast is still more than double the 12,000 Chinook salmon landed last year. Yukon king salmon commercial fishermen were dealt some good news with word that this year's harvest could be a bumper one. See what fisheries managers at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) have to say on the upcoming season. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) set the pre-season troll treaty harvest allocation Monday for 2017 in southeast Alaska. Read more about it in this IntraFish article. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) said Monday the commercial common property fish (CCPF) harvest projections for the 2017 salmon fishery in the Prince William Sound and Copper/Bering River areas is 63.71 million salmon, more than four times the 13.7 million fish harvested in 2016. Go here for a look at the breakdown by species. Buyers: Get ready to pay a lot more for Copper River salmon Copper River is the first fishing district to open up and the commercial common property fishery (CCPF) harvest projection is 1.1 million fish, 32 percent less than last year's harvest of 1.61 million. Click here for the forecasted harvest break down and to see what ADF&G biologists had to say when they talked to IntraFish on the upcoming season. Slump in Bristol Bay sockeye harvests to hit most fishing districts The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) released detailed harvest data for the five Bristol Bay districts Tuesday projecting declines in most of the regions compared with last year's harvest. The commercial salmon season in Bristol Bay opens June 1 with a total projected sockeye harvest of 27.47 million fish. Click here to look at the projected harvests for the individual districts For more seafood news and updates, follow us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our daily newsletter.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.intrafish.com

As of Sunday, Whole Foods Market in Seattle was carrying the coveted Copper River salmon. Social media was flaring up with posts from restaurants carrying the salmon as well: First Copper River sockeye landings just shy of forecast The numbers are in for the landings for the first Copper River opener. See what fishermen harvested and what the opening dates are for the other fishing districts in this IntraFish article. Copper River is on the menu in Seattle Although many Seattle-area retailers -- such as QFC, Safeway, Whole Foods and Metropolitan Market -- say they have not received Copper River salmon as of Friday morning, area restaurants are ready to serve the fish. Anthony's Restaurants is beginning to serve sockeye Friday and kings and sockeye on Saturday, the company's seafood buyer Tim Ferleman told IntraFish. The restaurant paid around $17 (€15) for sockeye and $23 (€20.50) for kings, he said. Elliott's Oyster House in Seattle also had Copper River salmon on the menu Friday, with king going for $58 (€51.77) and sockeye for $38 (€33.92), according to the restaurant. He beat out Spinasse and Artusi Executive Chef Stuart Lane and Wild Ginger Executive Chef David Yeo in the eighth annual competition, which used a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty Seafoods. Seattle gets its first salmon delivery Alaska Airlines landed Friday morning with 22,000 pounds of fish, including a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty Seafoods, which will be used by three Seattle chefs in the eighth annual "Copper Chef Cook-off." Alaska has four flights scheduled throughout Friday to deliver a total of 77,000 pounds of Copper River salmon to Anchorage and the lower 48. It partners with Ocean Beauty, Trident Seafoods and Copper River Seafoods. The season’s first fish, a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty became today's catch of the day. #CopperRiverSalmon pic.twitter.com/FTR8GheEw6 — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 We've got a great flight crew delivering the first #CopperRiverSalmon pic.twitter.com/bNsQW6C6K6 — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 It's a late night in Cordova as the #CopperRiverSalmon are coming off the boats. In a couple hours they'll be on our cargo plane. pic.twitter.com/sqbd83X8SL — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 IntraFish spoke to several sources in the industry to get a sampling of what prices processors were offering for the first batches of Copper River salmon. Prices this early in the season generally are not representative because of the small amount of fish harvested and the early enthusiasm for the fish. Typically, prices drop dramatically after a few openings have occurred and more fish enter the supply chain. See what the prices are in this article. Seattle won't get the first shipment of Copper River salmon this year. ACE Air Cargo beat Alaska Air with the first Copper River king salmon sent to 10th and M Seafoods, which will distribute to Anchorage restaurants Thursday night, according to KTVA news. Three groups to bring first salmon to Seattle The Copper River/Prince William Sound Marketing Association said Thursday its "fleet of 540 independent artisans" hit the waters to bring in the first Copper River salmon of the season. "We are looking forward to working with Alaska Airlines and this year's processing partner, Ocean Beauty, to celebrate the first fresh Copper River Salmon arriving in Seattle," said the organization. 500 boats left Cordova harbor yesterday to start fishing first thing this a.m. for @CopperRiverWild. First fish fly on @AlaskaAir tonight! pic.twitter.com/p7CZS4PkOe — Edible Seattle (@edibleseattle) May 18, 2017 Owned by Giant Eagle, midwestern supermarket chain Market District told customers Thursday to expect Copper River salmon soon. "Caught in Alaska and jet-shipped directly just hours after the catch, Copper River Salmon," said the retailer, which has 13 locations in western Pennsylvania and Ohio. Copper River salmon season has started! Here we go wild salmon season! #Copperriver #Salmon — Northport Fisheries (@NPDailyCatch) May 18, 2017 The weather "is pretty nice out," and "everyone is out of the harbor" fishing for the first Copper River salmon, Cordova Harbormaster Tony Schinella told IntraFish. He expects a good day of fishing and said he will start getting updates throughout the day. Today marks the opening of the Alaska salmon harvest season! RT if you're planning on making Alaska salmon for dinner tonight. pic.twitter.com/YpXghQWNIi — Alaska Seafood (@Alaska_Seafood) May 18, 2017 Gone fishing in Cordova. It's the season opener for Copper River Salmon today. Is your BBQ ready? #CopperRiverSalmon #Alaska pic.twitter.com/lLhlFC9ijD — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 18, 2017 US retailer Hy-Vee said Tuesday it plans to bring Copper River salmon to stores soon after the season kicks off and Alaskan salmon will carry the company's Responsible Choice label. "The consumer demand for this product has grown each year with foodies eagerly waiting for the first salmon to arrive in their local Hy-Vee," said the company. "The pure, pristine environment of the Copper River helps to create an omega-3 powerhouse." Will MSC label pay off for Prince William Sound salmon? It may be good short term, but 'added layer of cost associated with MSC certification remains an issue in the long term,' one analyst says. Click here to read the IntraFish story in full. Season is off to a good start already Good news for Alaska salmon harvesters -- last week the Prince William Sound region was officially certified as sustainable to the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard, bringing one of the industry's longest-running sagas to a close. The Prince William Sound fishery certification will apply to the 2017 harvest. Showers are expected in Cordova for the opening day of Copper River season, according to Weather.com. There's a 50 percent chance of precipitation, but the weather looks warm, with a high of 50 degrees Fahrenheit and a low of 41 degrees Fahrenheit. Winds are slated to come from the southeast at 10mph. The district opens May 18 for a 12-hour commercial fishing period. However, there will only be one 12-hour fishing period during the first week as opposed to the normal two periods per week. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) plans to implement more commercial fishery restrictions this season to reduce king salmon harvest. The Copper River king salmon forecast for this year is 29,000 fish, the smallest since 1985, and further evidence of a recent pattern of weak returns, said the department. However, this forecast is still more than double the 12,000 Chinook salmon landed last year. Yukon king salmon commercial fishermen were dealt some good news with word that this year's harvest could be a bumper one. See what fisheries managers at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) have to say on the upcoming season. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) set the pre-season troll treaty harvest allocation Monday for 2017 in southeast Alaska. Read more about it in this IntraFish article. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) said Monday the commercial common property fish (CCPF) harvest projections for the 2017 salmon fishery in the Prince William Sound and Copper/Bering River areas is 63.71 million salmon, more than four times the 13.7 million fish harvested in 2016. Go here for a look at the breakdown by species. Buyers: Get ready to pay a lot more for Copper River salmon Copper River is the first fishing district to open up and the commercial common property fishery (CCPF) harvest projection is 1.1 million fish, 32 percent less than last year's harvest of 1.61 million. Click here for the forecasted harvest break down and to see what ADF&G biologists had to say when they talked to IntraFish on the upcoming season. Slump in Bristol Bay sockeye harvests to hit most fishing districts The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) released detailed harvest data for the five Bristol Bay districts Tuesday projecting declines in most of the regions compared with last year's harvest. The commercial salmon season in Bristol Bay opens June 1 with a total projected sockeye harvest of 27.47 million fish. Click here to look at the projected harvests for the individual districts For more seafood news and updates, follow us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our daily newsletter.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.intrafish.com

The spring commercial salmon trolling season in Southeast Alaska will shut down a month early because of poor runs of king salmon. The season opened in May and is scheduled to close May 29; the fishery was expected to run through June. In the second Copper River fishing period this week, fishermen landed 1,718 chinook, bringing the total to 3,618. Fishermen landed 51,960 sockeye salmon bringing the Copper River total to 87,960. However, sockeye landings are 70 percent less in the first two weeks than the last 5-year average cumulative harvest for the same first two weeks. On Wednesday, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADFG) said the Copper River king salmon harvest from the first two fishing periods of this season was above anticipated levels despite unprecedented area restrictions, and poor weather conditions in the second period on May 22 reduced harvest efficiency. But, given the poor pre-season king salmon outlook, ADFG said a continued conservative commercial fisheries management approach is warranted. To reduce king salmon harvest during the next fishing period, start time will be delayed to avoid opening on an extreme low tide when fish are more vulnerable to harvest. In addition, the duration of this fishing period is shortened to avoid fishing after the evening low tide. The Copper River District will open for a nine-hour commercial fishing period from 11:00 am to 8:00 pm on Thursday. As of Sunday, Whole Foods Market in Seattle was carrying the coveted Copper River salmon. Social media was flaring up with posts from restaurants carrying the salmon as well: First Copper River sockeye landings just shy of forecast The numbers are in for the landings for the first Copper River opener. See what fishermen harvested and what the opening dates are for the other fishing districts in this IntraFish article. Copper River is on the menu in Seattle Although many Seattle-area retailers -- such as QFC, Safeway, Whole Foods and Metropolitan Market -- say they have not received Copper River salmon as of Friday morning, area restaurants are ready to serve the fish. Anthony's Restaurants is beginning to serve sockeye Friday and kings and sockeye on Saturday, the company's seafood buyer Tim Ferleman told IntraFish. The restaurant paid around $17 (€15) for sockeye and $23 (€20.50) for kings, he said. Elliott's Oyster House in Seattle also had Copper River salmon on the menu Friday, with king going for $58 (€51.77) and sockeye for $38 (€33.92), according to the restaurant. He beat out Spinasse and Artusi Executive Chef Stuart Lane and Wild Ginger Executive Chef David Yeo in the eighth annual competition, which used a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty Seafoods. Seattle gets its first salmon delivery Alaska Airlines landed Friday morning with 22,000 pounds of fish, including a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty Seafoods, which will be used by three Seattle chefs in the eighth annual "Copper Chef Cook-off." Alaska has four flights scheduled throughout Friday to deliver a total of 77,000 pounds of Copper River salmon to Anchorage and the lower 48. It partners with Ocean Beauty, Trident Seafoods and Copper River Seafoods. The season’s first fish, a 45-pound king salmon donated by Ocean Beauty became today's catch of the day. #CopperRiverSalmon pic.twitter.com/FTR8GheEw6 — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 We've got a great flight crew delivering the first #CopperRiverSalmon pic.twitter.com/bNsQW6C6K6 — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 It's a late night in Cordova as the #CopperRiverSalmon are coming off the boats. In a couple hours they'll be on our cargo plane. pic.twitter.com/sqbd83X8SL — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 19, 2017 IntraFish spoke to several sources in the industry to get a sampling of what prices processors were offering for the first batches of Copper River salmon. Prices this early in the season generally are not representative because of the small amount of fish harvested and the early enthusiasm for the fish. Typically, prices drop dramatically after a few openings have occurred and more fish enter the supply chain. See what the prices are in this article. Seattle won't get the first shipment of Copper River salmon this year. ACE Air Cargo beat Alaska Air with the first Copper River king salmon sent to 10th and M Seafoods, which will distribute to Anchorage restaurants Thursday night, according to KTVA news. Three groups to bring first salmon to Seattle The Copper River/Prince William Sound Marketing Association said Thursday its "fleet of 540 independent artisans" hit the waters to bring in the first Copper River salmon of the season. "We are looking forward to working with Alaska Airlines and this year's processing partner, Ocean Beauty, to celebrate the first fresh Copper River Salmon arriving in Seattle," said the organization. 500 boats left Cordova harbor yesterday to start fishing first thing this a.m. for @CopperRiverWild. First fish fly on @AlaskaAir tonight! pic.twitter.com/p7CZS4PkOe — Edible Seattle (@edibleseattle) May 18, 2017 Owned by Giant Eagle, midwestern supermarket chain Market District told customers Thursday to expect Copper River salmon soon. "Caught in Alaska and jet-shipped directly just hours after the catch, Copper River Salmon," said the retailer, which has 13 locations in western Pennsylvania and Ohio. Copper River salmon season has started! Here we go wild salmon season! #Copperriver #Salmon — Northport Fisheries (@NPDailyCatch) May 18, 2017 The weather "is pretty nice out," and "everyone is out of the harbor" fishing for the first Copper River salmon, Cordova Harbormaster Tony Schinella told IntraFish. He expects a good day of fishing and said he will start getting updates throughout the day. Today marks the opening of the Alaska salmon harvest season! RT if you're planning on making Alaska salmon for dinner tonight. pic.twitter.com/YpXghQWNIi — Alaska Seafood (@Alaska_Seafood) May 18, 2017 Gone fishing in Cordova. It's the season opener for Copper River Salmon today. Is your BBQ ready? #CopperRiverSalmon #Alaska pic.twitter.com/lLhlFC9ijD — Alaska Airlines (@AlaskaAir) May 18, 2017 US retailer Hy-Vee said Tuesday it plans to bring Copper River salmon to stores soon after the season kicks off and Alaskan salmon will carry the company's Responsible Choice label. "The consumer demand for this product has grown each year with foodies eagerly waiting for the first salmon to arrive in their local Hy-Vee," said the company. "The pure, pristine environment of the Copper River helps to create an omega-3 powerhouse." Will MSC label pay off for Prince William Sound salmon? It may be good short term, but 'added layer of cost associated with MSC certification remains an issue in the long term,' one analyst says. Click here to read the IntraFish story in full. Season is off to a good start already Good news for Alaska salmon harvesters -- last week the Prince William Sound region was officially certified as sustainable to the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard, bringing one of the industry's longest-running sagas to a close. The Prince William Sound fishery certification will apply to the 2017 harvest. Showers are expected in Cordova for the opening day of Copper River season, according to Weather.com. There's a 50 percent chance of precipitation, but the weather looks warm, with a high of 50 degrees Fahrenheit and a low of 41 degrees Fahrenheit. Winds are slated to come from the southeast at 10mph. The district opens May 18 for a 12-hour commercial fishing period. However, there will only be one 12-hour fishing period during the first week as opposed to the normal two periods per week. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) plans to implement more commercial fishery restrictions this season to reduce king salmon harvest. The Copper River king salmon forecast for this year is 29,000 fish, the smallest since 1985, and further evidence of a recent pattern of weak returns, said the department. However, this forecast is still more than double the 12,000 Chinook salmon landed last year. Yukon king salmon commercial fishermen were dealt some good news with word that this year's harvest could be a bumper one. See what fisheries managers at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) have to say on the upcoming season. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) set the pre-season troll treaty harvest allocation Monday for 2017 in southeast Alaska. Read more about it in this IntraFish article. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G) said Monday the commercial common property fish (CCPF) harvest projections for the 2017 salmon fishery in the Prince William Sound and Copper/Bering River areas is 63.71 million salmon, more than four times the 13.7 million fish harvested in 2016. Go here for a look at the breakdown by species. Buyers: Get ready to pay a lot more for Copper River salmon Copper River is the first fishing district to open up and the commercial common property fishery (CCPF) harvest projection is 1.1 million fish, 32 percent less than last year's harvest of 1.61 million. Click here for the forecasted harvest break down and to see what ADF&G biologists had to say when they talked to IntraFish on the upcoming season. Slump in Bristol Bay sockeye harvests to hit most fishing districts The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) released detailed harvest data for the five Bristol Bay districts Tuesday projecting declines in most of the regions compared with last year's harvest. The commercial salmon season in Bristol Bay opens June 1 with a total projected sockeye harvest of 27.47 million fish. Click here to look at the projected harvests for the individual districts For more seafood news and updates, follow us on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our daily newsletter.


Copper River Chinook salmon landings hit 3,618 fish as of May 24, putting the fishery far ahead of schedule to reaching the 4,000 fish harvest projection for this season as a whole, in just two days of fishing. The first two fishing periods of the season commenced May 18 and May 22. In response, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) decided to scale back the third Copper River sockeye and Chinook fishing period of the season, set for May 25, noting the abundant Chinook catch came despite unprecedented area restrictions and poor weather conditions in the second period. “Given the poor preseason king [Chinook] salmon outlook, a continued conservative commercial fisheries management approach is warranted,” ADF&G said in a release announcing its decision May 24. As a result, managers reduced the king salmon harvest for the next fishing period. Meanwhile, the total sockeye harvested for the season so far was 87.9 million as of May 24, slightly below expectations for this point in the season. Sockeye landings hit 52,000 fish on Monday, down slightly from the anticipated harvest for that day of 81,000. The total harvest projection for sockeye in Copper River is 889,000 fish this year. Distributors have described wholesale prices for both species as being at either “record” or “ridiculous” levels, while fishermen also cite high ex-vessel prices, in interviews with Undercurrent News. Meanwhile, Seattle TV station Kiro 7 also characterize opening prices in Seattle as record-setting. Hamish Walker, purchasing director for Denver-based Seattle Fish Company, also told Undercurrent the prices are “much higher this year compared to last year”. However, he questioned whether the prices would hold. “In the first week you can always sell everything you've got because supply is limited and everybody wants to be first, but then as time goes on it’ll be interesting to see if the demand holds up,” he said.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

Two bills which aim to improve access to state funding for Alaska’s shellfish and marine plant cultivators have been passed by the state’s House of Representatives this week. House Bill 76 provides the financial infrastructure to develop a stable supply of seed for resident aquatic plants and shellfish at no additional cost to Alaskans. Today, Alaska shellfish farms do not have a regular, in-state source of seed for aquatic plants and other shellfish. Meanwhile House Bill 128 allows qualified non-profits to pursue enhancement and/or restoration projects involving shellfish species, including red and blue king crab, sea cucumber, abalone, geoduck and razor clams. Both bills are sponsored by Representative Dan Ortiz (I-Ketchikan). Alaska’s seafood industry is the single largest private employer in the state – commercial fisheries employ over 30,000 independent entrepreneurs and already have a monetary value of $6 billion. These bills would help increase and diversify Alaska’s fishery portfolio to help realize the $1 billion potential of commercial shellfish and marine plant production. “I hope to support the continued growth of local industry, and help Alaska remain competitive with China, Russia, and Canada, all of whom have invested significant resources in mariculture infrastructure,” said Rep. Ortiz. “We can do this by ensuring Alaskan shellfish and marine plant farmers have access to capital to jump-start the year-round, in-state seed supply they need.” “Alaskans have been harvesting shellfish for centuries, but the commercial potential of these fisheries far exceeds current levels,” Ortiz added. “While seeking to capitalize on the obvious opportunity presented by Alaska mariculture, it is crucial we realize these opportunities in a responsible manner that protects our existing world-class fisheries. With that in mind, HB 128 creates a framework for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to permit and manage these projects and sets out stringent safety standards to ensure sustainability and health of existing natural stocks.” Both bills have received broad support – from fishermen and women, constituents, community economic development organizations, and the Governor’s Mariculture Task Force. House Bill 76 passed the Alaska House of Representatives on May 1st by a vote of 26-14. House Bill 125 passed the House by a vote of 37-2. Both will now be sent to the Alaska State Senate for consideration.


The research, which appears today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, sheds new light on how wet, windy weather can affect tree swallow nesting and underscores the importance of considering factors beyond temperature when examining how climate change might affect species' biological niche. Over the past decade and a half, the average egg hatching date for tree swallows—a common migratory bird species that winters in temperate southern climates before nesting in the spring at sites across North America, including the sub-Arctic regions covered in the study—has shifted earlier in the year by an average of six days. This change is similar to, but considerably greater than, changes seen in more southerly sites and until now has been believed to correlate with rising temperatures. However, when CU Boulder researchers tested how swallow nesting data from two different Alaskan sites corresponded with both daily and seasonal climate indicators like the number of windy days, days with measureable precipitation and average daily temperature, they found that windiness (or lack thereof) had the most consistent correlation with swallow breeding patterns over time. "We expected that temperature and precipitation would be much more strongly predictive than wind," said Daniel Doak, a professor in CU Boulder's Environmental Studies Program and the co-author of the new research. "The study demonstrates that fine-scale climate effects are important to consider when thinking about what's going to affect a species." The study developed as a result of a CU Boulder undergraduate's research efforts. Rachel Irons, then a junior in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, received a UROP grant and worked with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game on a long-term tree swallow nesting study to fulfill her senior thesis requirements. "Swallow phenology in Alaska is shifting at twice the rate of the continental U.S.," said Irons, who is the lead author of the new paper. "I figured it was related to temperature, but I added in wind and precipitation measurements just to get the whole climate picture." The results showed that a long-term decline in windiness (and to a more variable extent, rain) in central Alaska over the past decade-plus correlated with the birds' earlier breeding much more strongly than temperature, indicating that wet, windy spring weather that may have delayed egg laying in the past is now less of an impediment for the swallows. The authors noted that while it is not necessarily surprising that wind and rain would affect an aerial foraging species like tree swallows, the findings emphasize the need to broaden the scope of consideration when making predictions about which climate mechanisms will influence population ecology. "This shows that our initial intuitions are not always good about what's going to impact these birds and their patterns," said Doak. Explore further: Early arrival gives bluebirds an edge in keeping nest sites More information: Wind and rain are the primary climate factors driving changing phenology of an aerial insectivore, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rspb.2017.0412


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Wind and precipitation play a crucial role in advancing or delaying the breeding cycles of North American tree swallows, according to the results of a new University of Colorado Boulder-led study. The research, which appears today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, sheds new light on how wet, windy weather can affect tree swallow nesting and underscores the importance of considering factors beyond temperature when examining how climate change might affect species' biological niche. Over the past decade and a half, the average egg hatching date for tree swallows -- a common migratory bird species that winters in temperate southern climates before nesting in the spring at sites across North America, including the sub-Arctic regions covered in the study -- has shifted earlier in the year by an average of six days. This change is similar to, but considerably greater than, changes seen in more southerly sites and until now has been believed to correlate with rising temperatures. However, when CU Boulder researchers tested how swallow nesting data from two different Alaskan sites corresponded with both daily and seasonal climate indicators like the number of windy days, days with measureable precipitation and average daily temperature, they found that windiness (or lack thereof) had the most consistent correlation with swallow breeding patterns over time. "We expected that temperature and precipitation would be much more strongly predictive than wind," said Daniel Doak, a professor in CU Boulder's Environmental Studies Program and the co-author of the new research. "The study demonstrates that fine-scale climate effects are important to consider when thinking about what's going to affect a species." The study developed as a result of a CU Boulder undergraduate's research efforts. Rachel Irons, then a junior in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, received a UROP grant and worked with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game on a long-term tree swallow nesting study to fulfill her senior thesis requirements. "Swallow phenology in Alaska is shifting at twice the rate of the continental U.S.," said Irons, who is the lead author of the new paper. "I figured it was related to temperature, but I added in wind and precipitation measurements just to get the whole climate picture." The results showed that a long-term decline in windiness (and to a more variable extent, rain) in central Alaska over the past decade-plus correlated with the birds' earlier breeding much more strongly than temperature, indicating that wet, windy spring weather that may have delayed egg laying in the past is now less of an impediment for the swallows. The authors noted that while it is not necessarily surprising that wind and rain would affect an aerial foraging species like tree swallows, the findings emphasize the need to broaden the scope of consideration when making predictions about which climate mechanisms will influence population ecology. "This shows that our initial intuitions are not always good about what's going to impact these birds and their patterns," said Doak. Additional co-authors of the new study include Alexandra Rose of CU Boulder; April Harding Scurr and Tricia Blake of the Alaska Songbird Institute; and Julie Hagelin of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

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