Birmingham, AL, United States
Birmingham, AL, United States

Alabama Power Company, headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, is a company in the southern United States that provides electricity service to 1.4 million customers in the southern two-thirds of Alabama. It also operates appliance stores. It is one of four U.S. utilities operated by the Southern Company, one of the nation’s largest generators of electricity.Alabama Power is an investor-owned, tax-paying utility, and the second largest subsidiary of Southern Company. More than 78,000 miles of power lines carry electricity to customers throughout 44,500 square miles .Alabama Power’s hydroelectric generating plants encompass several lakes on the Tallapoosa, Coosa, and Black Warrior rivers, as well as coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear and cogeneration plants in various parts of the state. In addition to generating electricity, the waters surrounding the plants offer recreational opportunities for Alabama residents and visitors. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

When the University of Alabama at Birmingham sidelined its football program after the 2014 season because of a lack of funding, Jegil Dugger knew, someday, the school again would field a team. As the Blazers are set to return to the field this September, the school’s former star running back is helping carry the financial load. Today, Dugger designs software and technology for Juke Slot, a prominent company in the automated technology industry and holds several government issued patents. Most notably, he is a leader in designing technology to improve the daily lives of the deaf and hard of hearing. Dugger has pledged $100,000 to the UAB Football Operations Center, joining an elite group to become a major donor to the program. In doing so, he joins several significant long-time contributors working for a successful return of football to central Alabama. The effort already has received large gifts from both local corporations and individual donors, including a $1 million donation from Jimmy Filler, and $500,000 gifts from Protective Life, Alabama Power, Medical Properties Trust and Mike Thompson of Thompson Tractor Co. Inc. Construction on the UAB Football Operations Center, which will house office space, meeting and film rooms, athletic training facilities, locker rooms and a weight room, is scheduled to be complete on July 1, 2017. Fans can check out the progress of the Football Operations Center by visiting www.uab.edu/footballfacility. The University of Alabama System Board of Trustees expedited approval of the Football Operations Center not-to-exceed $22.5 million on June 17, 2016. Dugger ran for nearly 2,000 yards during his UAB career that spanned 1998-2001. He ranks top on the school’s all-time rushing list for yards and touchdowns and top in many other school record categories. Dugger has deep ties to UAB. His mother was employed at the school. While attending the university, he met another student who would later become his wife. And his son – who Dugger hopes someday will attend the school and graduate himself – was born at UAB Hospital. After graduating from Midfield High School, Dugger, nationally rated as a top 50 running back, turned down several Division I scholarships to Southeastern Conference schools – including Arkansas, South Carolina and Alabama – to be part of the UAB program. With the Blazers, he wound up being the team captain, team MVP, All-Conference USA, a candidate for the Doak Walker Award – all while helping UAB to its first Division I winning seasons in 2000 and 2001. Dugger finished college as an NFL prospect, and ended up playing in the Canadian Football League with the Edmonton Eskimos. “UAB has always been dear to me,” he said. “I believe the possibilities for the football program are tremendous. When I signed my letter of intent in high school to attend UAB, I made a life time commitment.” Dugger heard rumors a couple years ago of the UAB program being eliminated, but saw it as an improbable move. Until it happened. “I did not believe it. I felt a pain that I never would imagine,” he said. “To commit my blood, sweat and tears to a program and putting in all the hard work and effort as I did, it felt like part of me died. “I thought that all the hard work, two-a-days, summer workouts and victories were all in vain and thrown down the drain. I considered my son growing old, and all I would be able to explain to him is what used to be, with no evidence of the past or the program. I also felt saddened for the kids that were on scholarship at the time the program shut down. Those kids made a life time commitment to UAB and I know were deeply hurt by the programs decision to end football.” Dugger said he didn’t believe the hiatus would last long. Too many people within the community backed the program – whether financially, packing seats on game day or donning Blazers logo wear – to have let it disappear permanently. Now Dugger is committed, along with scores of others, to seeing UAB re-establish a winning tradition. To do so, backers have to continue their avid support, he said. And, of course, players and coaches have to approach the game with confidence and determination. Dugger, for one, has lofty expectations. “I see this program one day being able to compete for a national championship,” he said. “I believe the 7-4 season in which we beat LSU showed that this program can compete for a national championship with the right financial backing and fan support. Alumni of the football program are becoming more active and coming back. It is important for the players, coaches and everybody involved to get that winning mentality back – expect to win.”


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

When the University of Alabama at Birmingham sidelined its football program after the 2014 season because of a lack of funding, Jegil Dugger knew, someday, the school again would field a team. As the Blazers are set to return to the field this September, the school’s former star running back is helping carry the financial load. Today, Dugger designs software and technology for Juke Slot, a prominent company in the automated technology industry and holds several government issued patents. Most notably, he is a leader in designing technology to improve the daily lives of the deaf and hard of hearing. Dugger has pledged $100,000 to the UAB Football Operations Center, joining an elite group to become a major donor to the program. In doing so, he joins several significant long-time contributors working for a successful return of football to central Alabama. The effort already has received large gifts from both local corporations and individual donors, including a $1 million donation from Jimmy Filler, and $500,000 gifts from Protective Life, Alabama Power, Medical Properties Trust and Mike Thompson of Thompson Tractor Co. Inc. Construction on the UAB Football Operations Center, which will house office space, meeting and film rooms, athletic training facilities, locker rooms and a weight room, is scheduled to be complete on July 1, 2017. Fans can check out the progress of the Football Operations Center by visiting www.uab.edu/footballfacility. The University of Alabama System Board of Trustees expedited approval of the Football Operations Center not-to-exceed $22.5 million on June 17, 2016. Dugger ran for nearly 2,000 yards during his UAB career that spanned 1998-2001. He ranks top on the school’s all-time rushing list for yards and touchdowns and top in many other school record categories. Dugger has deep ties to UAB. His mother was employed at the school. While attending the university, he met another student who would later become his wife. And his son – who Dugger hopes someday will attend the school and graduate himself – was born at UAB Hospital. After graduating from Midfield High School, Dugger, nationally rated as a top 50 running back, turned down several Division I scholarships to Southeastern Conference schools – including Arkansas, South Carolina and Alabama – to be part of the UAB program. With the Blazers, he wound up being the team captain, team MVP, All-Conference USA, a candidate for the Doak Walker Award – all while helping UAB to its first Division I winning seasons in 2000 and 2001. Dugger finished college as an NFL prospect, and ended up playing in the Canadian Football League with the Edmonton Eskimos. “UAB has always been dear to me,” he said. “I believe the possibilities for the football program are tremendous. When I signed my letter of intent in high school to attend UAB, I made a life time commitment.” Dugger heard rumors a couple years ago of the UAB program being eliminated, but saw it as an improbable move. Until it happened. “I did not believe it. I felt a pain that I never would imagine,” he said. “To commit my blood, sweat and tears to a program and putting in all the hard work and effort as I did, it felt like part of me died. “I thought that all the hard work, two-a-days, summer workouts and victories were all in vain and thrown down the drain. I considered my son growing old, and all I would be able to explain to him is what used to be, with no evidence of the past or the program. I also felt saddened for the kids that were on scholarship at the time the program shut down. Those kids made a life time commitment to UAB and I know were deeply hurt by the programs decision to end football.” Dugger said he didn’t believe the hiatus would last long. Too many people within the community backed the program – whether financially, packing seats on game day or donning Blazers logo wear – to have let it disappear permanently. Now Dugger is committed, along with scores of others, to seeing UAB re-establish a winning tradition. To do so, backers have to continue their avid support, he said. And, of course, players and coaches have to approach the game with confidence and determination. Dugger, for one, has lofty expectations. “I see this program one day being able to compete for a national championship,” he said. “I believe the 7-4 season in which we beat LSU showed that this program can compete for a national championship with the right financial backing and fan support. Alumni of the football program are becoming more active and coming back. It is important for the players, coaches and everybody involved to get that winning mentality back – expect to win.”


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

When the University of Alabama at Birmingham sidelined its football program after the 2014 season because of a lack of funding, Jegil Dugger knew, someday, the school again would field a team. As the Blazers are set to return to the field this September, the school’s former star running back is helping carry the financial load. Today, Dugger designs software and technology for Juke Slot, a prominent company in the automated technology industry and holds several government issued patents. Most notably, he is a leader in designing technology to improve the daily lives of the deaf and hard of hearing. Dugger has pledged $100,000 to the UAB Football Operations Center, joining an elite group to become a major donor to the program. In doing so, he joins several significant long-time contributors working for a successful return of football to central Alabama. The effort already has received large gifts from both local corporations and individual donors, including a $1 million donation from Jimmy Filler, and $500,000 gifts from Protective Life, Alabama Power, Medical Properties Trust and Mike Thompson of Thompson Tractor Co. Inc. Construction on the UAB Football Operations Center, which will house office space, meeting and film rooms, athletic training facilities, locker rooms and a weight room, is scheduled to be complete on July 1, 2017. Fans can check out the progress of the Football Operations Center by visiting www.uab.edu/footballfacility. The University of Alabama System Board of Trustees expedited approval of the Football Operations Center not-to-exceed $22.5 million on June 17, 2016. Dugger ran for nearly 2,000 yards during his UAB career that spanned 1998-2001. He ranks top on the school’s all-time rushing list for yards and touchdowns and top in many other school record categories. Dugger has deep ties to UAB. His mother was employed at the school. While attending the university, he met another student who would later become his wife. And his son – who Dugger hopes someday will attend the school and graduate himself – was born at UAB Hospital. After graduating from Midfield High School, Dugger, nationally rated as a top 50 running back, turned down several Division I scholarships to Southeastern Conference schools – including Arkansas, South Carolina and Alabama – to be part of the UAB program. With the Blazers, he wound up being the team captain, team MVP, All-Conference USA, a candidate for the Doak Walker Award – all while helping UAB to its first Division I winning seasons in 2000 and 2001. Dugger finished college as an NFL prospect, and ended up playing in the Canadian Football League with the Edmonton Eskimos. “UAB has always been dear to me,” he said. “I believe the possibilities for the football program are tremendous. When I signed my letter of intent in high school to attend UAB, I made a life time commitment.” Dugger heard rumors a couple years ago of the UAB program being eliminated, but saw it as an improbable move. Until it happened. “I did not believe it. I felt a pain that I never would imagine,” he said. “To commit my blood, sweat and tears to a program and putting in all the hard work and effort as I did, it felt like part of me died. “I thought that all the hard work, two-a-days, summer workouts and victories were all in vain and thrown down the drain. I considered my son growing old, and all I would be able to explain to him is what used to be, with no evidence of the past or the program. I also felt saddened for the kids that were on scholarship at the time the program shut down. Those kids made a life time commitment to UAB and I know were deeply hurt by the programs decision to end football.” Dugger said he didn’t believe the hiatus would last long. Too many people within the community backed the program – whether financially, packing seats on game day or donning Blazers logo wear – to have let it disappear permanently. Now Dugger is committed, along with scores of others, to seeing UAB re-establish a winning tradition. To do so, backers have to continue their avid support, he said. And, of course, players and coaches have to approach the game with confidence and determination. Dugger, for one, has lofty expectations. “I see this program one day being able to compete for a national championship,” he said. “I believe the 7-4 season in which we beat LSU showed that this program can compete for a national championship with the right financial backing and fan support. Alumni of the football program are becoming more active and coming back. It is important for the players, coaches and everybody involved to get that winning mentality back – expect to win.”


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

When the University of Alabama at Birmingham sidelined its football program after the 2014 season because of a lack of funding, Jegil Dugger knew, someday, the school again would field a team. As the Blazers are set to return to the field this September, the school’s former star running back is helping carry the financial load. Today, Dugger designs software and technology for Juke Slot, a prominent company in the automated technology industry and holds several government issued patents. Most notably, he is a leader in designing technology to improve the daily lives of the deaf and hard of hearing. Dugger has pledged $100,000 to the UAB Football Operations Center, joining an elite group to become a major donor to the program. In doing so, he joins several significant long-time contributors working for a successful return of football to central Alabama. The effort already has received large gifts from both local corporations and individual donors, including a $1 million donation from Jimmy Filler, and $500,000 gifts from Protective Life, Alabama Power, Medical Properties Trust and Mike Thompson of Thompson Tractor Co. Inc. Construction on the UAB Football Operations Center, which will house office space, meeting and film rooms, athletic training facilities, locker rooms and a weight room, is scheduled to be complete on July 1, 2017. Fans can check out the progress of the Football Operations Center by visiting www.uab.edu/footballfacility. The University of Alabama System Board of Trustees expedited approval of the Football Operations Center not-to-exceed $22.5 million on June 17, 2016. Dugger ran for nearly 2,000 yards during his UAB career that spanned 1998-2001. He ranks top on the school’s all-time rushing list for yards and touchdowns and top in many other school record categories. Dugger has deep ties to UAB. His mother was employed at the school. While attending the university, he met another student who would later become his wife. And his son – who Dugger hopes someday will attend the school and graduate himself – was born at UAB Hospital. After graduating from Midfield High School, Dugger, nationally rated as a top 50 running back, turned down several Division I scholarships to Southeastern Conference schools – including Arkansas, South Carolina and Alabama – to be part of the UAB program. With the Blazers, he wound up being the team captain, team MVP, All-Conference USA, a candidate for the Doak Walker Award – all while helping UAB to its first Division I winning seasons in 2000 and 2001. Dugger finished college as an NFL prospect, and ended up playing in the Canadian Football League with the Edmonton Eskimos. “UAB has always been dear to me,” he said. “I believe the possibilities for the football program are tremendous. When I signed my letter of intent in high school to attend UAB, I made a life time commitment.” Dugger heard rumors a couple years ago of the UAB program being eliminated, but saw it as an improbable move. Until it happened. “I did not believe it. I felt a pain that I never would imagine,” he said. “To commit my blood, sweat and tears to a program and putting in all the hard work and effort as I did, it felt like part of me died. “I thought that all the hard work, two-a-days, summer workouts and victories were all in vain and thrown down the drain. I considered my son growing old, and all I would be able to explain to him is what used to be, with no evidence of the past or the program. I also felt saddened for the kids that were on scholarship at the time the program shut down. Those kids made a life time commitment to UAB and I know were deeply hurt by the programs decision to end football.” Dugger said he didn’t believe the hiatus would last long. Too many people within the community backed the program – whether financially, packing seats on game day or donning Blazers logo wear – to have let it disappear permanently. Now Dugger is committed, along with scores of others, to seeing UAB re-establish a winning tradition. To do so, backers have to continue their avid support, he said. And, of course, players and coaches have to approach the game with confidence and determination. Dugger, for one, has lofty expectations. “I see this program one day being able to compete for a national championship,” he said. “I believe the 7-4 season in which we beat LSU showed that this program can compete for a national championship with the right financial backing and fan support. Alumni of the football program are becoming more active and coming back. It is important for the players, coaches and everybody involved to get that winning mentality back – expect to win.”


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

When the University of Alabama at Birmingham sidelined its football program after the 2014 season because of a lack of funding, Jegil Dugger knew, someday, the school again would field a team. As the Blazers are set to return to the field this September, the school’s former star running back is helping carry the financial load. Today, Dugger designs software and technology for Juke Slot, a prominent company in the automated technology industry and holds several government issued patents. Most notably, he is a leader in designing technology to improve the daily lives of the deaf and hard of hearing. Dugger has pledged $100,000 to the UAB Football Operations Center, joining an elite group to become a major donor to the program. In doing so, he joins several significant long-time contributors working for a successful return of football to central Alabama. The effort already has received large gifts from both local corporations and individual donors, including a $1 million donation from Jimmy Filler, and $500,000 gifts from Protective Life, Alabama Power, Medical Properties Trust and Mike Thompson of Thompson Tractor Co. Inc. Construction on the UAB Football Operations Center, which will house office space, meeting and film rooms, athletic training facilities, locker rooms and a weight room, is scheduled to be complete on July 1, 2017. Fans can check out the progress of the Football Operations Center by visiting www.uab.edu/footballfacility. The University of Alabama System Board of Trustees expedited approval of the Football Operations Center not-to-exceed $22.5 million on June 17, 2016. Dugger ran for nearly 2,000 yards during his UAB career that spanned 1998-2001. He ranks top on the school’s all-time rushing list for yards and touchdowns and top in many other school record categories. Dugger has deep ties to UAB. His mother was employed at the school. While attending the university, he met another student who would later become his wife. And his son – who Dugger hopes someday will attend the school and graduate himself – was born at UAB Hospital. After graduating from Midfield High School, Dugger, nationally rated as a top 50 running back, turned down several Division I scholarships to Southeastern Conference schools – including Arkansas, South Carolina and Alabama – to be part of the UAB program. With the Blazers, he wound up being the team captain, team MVP, All-Conference USA, a candidate for the Doak Walker Award – all while helping UAB to its first Division I winning seasons in 2000 and 2001. Dugger finished college as an NFL prospect, and ended up playing in the Canadian Football League with the Edmonton Eskimos. “UAB has always been dear to me,” he said. “I believe the possibilities for the football program are tremendous. When I signed my letter of intent in high school to attend UAB, I made a life time commitment.” Dugger heard rumors a couple years ago of the UAB program being eliminated, but saw it as an improbable move. Until it happened. “I did not believe it. I felt a pain that I never would imagine,” he said. “To commit my blood, sweat and tears to a program and putting in all the hard work and effort as I did, it felt like part of me died. “I thought that all the hard work, two-a-days, summer workouts and victories were all in vain and thrown down the drain. I considered my son growing old, and all I would be able to explain to him is what used to be, with no evidence of the past or the program. I also felt saddened for the kids that were on scholarship at the time the program shut down. Those kids made a life time commitment to UAB and I know were deeply hurt by the programs decision to end football.” Dugger said he didn’t believe the hiatus would last long. Too many people within the community backed the program – whether financially, packing seats on game day or donning Blazers logo wear – to have let it disappear permanently. Now Dugger is committed, along with scores of others, to seeing UAB re-establish a winning tradition. To do so, backers have to continue their avid support, he said. And, of course, players and coaches have to approach the game with confidence and determination. Dugger, for one, has lofty expectations. “I see this program one day being able to compete for a national championship,” he said. “I believe the 7-4 season in which we beat LSU showed that this program can compete for a national championship with the right financial backing and fan support. Alumni of the football program are becoming more active and coming back. It is important for the players, coaches and everybody involved to get that winning mentality back – expect to win.”


News Article | June 15, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

Our first-ever scorecard of US utilities, released today, reveals striking regional differences and the identifies the best — and worst — performers on energy efficiency. The 2017 Utility Energy Efficiency Scorecard looks at the performance of the 51 largest electric utilities in the United States and highlights cutting-edge efforts. Topping the list are Eversource Massachusetts and National Grid Massachusetts, which both earned the same score. Rounding out the top five are Pacific Gas & Electric, Baltimore Gas & Electric, and Eversource Connecticut. Utilities are the primary providers of energy efficiency programs for US electricity customers. These programs deliver enormous benefits to households and businesses. Efficiency lowers customer bills, allows utilities to avoid or defer building new power plants or other infrastructure, and reduces local pollutants associated with electricity generation. We wanted to dig further into this topic to determine which utilities are doing the best on energy efficiency programs and how others can improve. Typical programs encourage the purchase of efficient appliances, lighting, and heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) — both at home and in other places such as commercial kitchens and restaurants. Leading utilities sometimes undertake 20 or more efficiency programs. Only a few utilities take some of the more forward-thinking approaches such as promoting smart thermostats, residential geo-targeting, zero net energy buildings, and advanced space-heating heat pumps. This report, the newest addition to our Scorecard series, is a first-of-its-kind deep dive into utility-sector energy efficiency efforts. It provides an important data baseline to assess energy efficiency in the utility sector. At the top of the list, Eversource Massachusetts and National Grid Massachusetts both earn 91% of total points. Both achieved more than 3% savings as a percentage of their retail sales in 2015 — a notable achievement. The top 10 show impressive commitment to efficiency through a wide range of long-term programs and policies. Based on 2015 data, we examined 18 metrics across three categories including quantitative savings and spending performance, program diversity and emerging areas, and efficiency-related regulatory issues. Notable findings: Overall, scores vary widely among the 51 utilities, leaving a lot of room for improvement. The five utilities with the most room to grow are Ohio Edison, Florida Power and Light, Entergy LA, Dominion Energy, and Alabama Power. The report shows impressive and exemplary utility commitment to offering customers energy efficiency services. The findings underscore that state and regulatory support as well as company commitment are critical for high achievement. We are pleased to provide this snapshot of utility-sector efficiency and hope it will help promote effective program design and implementation. Tune in next week to our webinar, where we’ll dive even more deeply into the results of the Scorecard with additional reactions from regional energy efficiency organizations across the United States. We developed metrics that span a wide range of vital utility-sector efficiency programs and performance, each with a point value relative to its importance to utility-sector energy efficiency. We focus on 2015 performance but also on long-term planning and innovation, which are critical to the continued inclusion of energy efficiency as a utility resource. The metrics aim to evaluate performance in a specific utility service territory, although we recognize that utilities operate under complex regulatory and policy landscapes. The report, which received no utility funding, focuses on the 51 largest electric utilities by retail sales volume. It specifically looks at state jurisdictional utilities rather than parent or holding companies. We include utility-funded programs, both those operated directly by utilities and those operated by third-party administrators with funding from utilities. We collected public utility filings, reports, and documents to create an initial data set, and worked with utility and other contacts to fill in gaps and confirm data. In some cases, data was adjusted for accurate comparison across utilities. All 51 utilities were provided the opportunity to review the report before its publication.


News Article | June 20, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Several the properties are in the City of Birmingham, including a parcel adjacent to George Ward Park on Birmingham's Southside. The auction includes various types of properties in Jefferson and Shelby counties that have never been offered to the public. Bidding starts at $1 on each parcel, said Chip Pearce, president of Pearce & Associates. Most parcels are selling with no reserve. All substation facilities, transformers and other utility equipment have been removed from the properties. This is the first auction by Pearce & Associates to sell parcels of land for Alabama Power. Additional auctions may follow. "Our marketing program will bring the properties to the attention of prospective buyers and provide bidders with the information they need to make purchase decisions," Pearce said. The initial auction will end July 5 at BidAPC.com or AuctionbyPearce.com. The digital auction site has zoning information, maps, photos and other information. Those seeking additional details may call Pearce & Associates at 205-664-4300. Pearce & Associates, based in Alabaster, Alabama, conducts regular auctions for U.S. bankruptcy courts, cities, Alagasco, KBR International Construction, estate executors, and others. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/pearce--associates-announces-sale-of-alabama-power-real-estate-300476736.html


News Article | June 29, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Dynetics has been serving the complex technical needs of the defense, aerospace, and intelligence sectors for more than 40 years," said David King, Dynetics chief executive officer. "Our experience in these areas led directly to the development of commercial products and services for critical infrastructure owner/operators, beginning with GroundAware. Now, we are taking the next logical step in this growing commercial business," King added. O.W.L. will focus exclusively on the specialized needs of critical infrastructure sectors. It will manage and operate its own engineering, sales, marketing, implementation, support and business functions, while leveraging Dynetics' extensive facilities and resources. Alabama Power, a subsidiary of the Atlanta-based Southern Company (NYSE: SO) that provides reliable and affordable electricity to more than 1.4 million customers across the state of Alabama, was an early adopter of GroundAware. "We have used GroundAware for more than two years," said Scott Moore, senior vice president of Power Delivery for Alabama Power. "We have found GroundAware to be a superior product that has helped us automate our security systems while enhancing situational awareness, and increasing operational efficiencies. We consider Dynetics a strategic partner and are delighted to see the creation of O.W.L. GroundAware and other O.W.L technology solutions will help us maintain the reliability and grid integrity our customers have come to expect from Alabama Power." O.W.L. plans to begin its operations with ongoing expansion of the GroundAware surveillance sensor product line business in the U.S. and internationally. O.W.L. is also initiating development of new product lines to address other significant needs of customers in key critical infrastructure markets. Mike Stokes, with 20-plus years of engineering and technical leadership and a current member of the Dynetics executive staff, serves as president. Dynetics provides responsive, cost-effective engineering, scientific and IT solutions to the national security, cybersecurity, satellite, launch, automotive and critical infrastructure sectors. Our portfolio features highly specialized technical services and a range of software and hardware products, including components, subsystems and complex end-to-end systems. The company of 1,400 employee/owners is based in Huntsville, Ala., and has offices throughout the U.S. For more information, visit www.dynetics.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dynetics-forms-company-to-provide-critical-infrastructure-security-solutions-300482132.html


News Article | June 1, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"As we mark this incredible milestone for Plant Vogtle and its team, we remain focused on supporting our communities and ensuring that we have the most flexible and diverse generation mix in place to serve our customers today and for decades to come," said Paul Bowers, chairman, president and CEO of Georgia Power. "A diverse fuel mix, including nuclear, is essential to maintaining a reliable and affordable energy infrastructure that attracts new investment, supports economic growth and creates jobs. Working with the Georgia Public Service Commission through the established Integrated Resource Planning process, we are making the right long-term investments and producing a competitive and sustainable energy environment in our state." In addition to power production for the state's electric customers, Plant Vogtle's community impact over the last 30 years includes: Plant Vogtle sits on a 3,200-acre site along the Savannah River, in Burke County near Waynesboro, Georgia. The plant is operated by Southern Nuclear and jointly owned by Georgia Power (45.7 percent), Oglethorpe Power (30 percent), MEAG Power (22.7 percent) and Dalton Utilities (1.6 percent). In June 2009, Plant Vogtle's operating license was extended for 20 years. Construction of two new nuclear units at the site (Vogtle 3 & 4) is currently underway. The plant is located in a rural area that supports diverse wildlife and, with management programs that enhance habitat for species such as bluebirds, wood ducks and wild turkey, Plant Vogtle has been a certified Wildlife Habitat Council site since 1993. The plant also currently maintains a Safe Harbor Agreement with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources for the red cockaded woodpecker, a federal endangered species. Georgia Power is the largest electric subsidiary of Southern Company (NYSE: SO), America's premier energy company. Value, Reliability, Customer Service and Stewardship are the cornerstones of the company's promise to 2.5 million customers in all but four of Georgia's 159 counties. Committed to delivering clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy at rates below the national average, Georgia Power maintains a diverse, innovative generation mix that includes nuclear, 21st century coal and natural gas, as well as renewables such as solar, hydroelectric and wind. Georgia Power focuses on delivering world-class service to its customers every day and the company is consistently recognized by J.D. Power and Associates as an industry leader in customer satisfaction. For more information, visit www.GeorgiaPower.com and connect with the company on Facebook (Facebook.com/GeorgiaPower), Twitter (Twitter.com/GeorgiaPower) and Instagram (Instagram.com/ga_power). Southern Nuclear, a subsidiary of Southern Company (NYSE: SO), is a leader among the nation's nuclear energy facility operators and an innovator in advanced nuclear technologies. Southern Nuclear is an essential part of Southern Company's energy portfolio, and its importance will continue to grow as America transitions to a low-carbon energy future. While the company produces clean, safe and reliable nuclear energy, it's also an economic engine powered by quality jobs and community service. Southern Nuclear operates a total of six units for Alabama Power and Georgia Power at the Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant near Dothan, Ala.; the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant near Baxley, Ga.; and the Alvin W. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant near Waynesboro, Ga. Southern Nuclear is the licensee of two new nuclear units currently under construction at Plant Vogtle that are among the first nuclear units being constructed in the United States in more than 30 years. Southern Nuclear received numerous accolades in 2016 for leadership in the advancement of nuclear energy including the Special Achievement Award by the United States Nuclear Infrastructure Council and the Presidential Citation by the American Nuclear Society. Southern Nuclear also received two of the Nuclear Energy Institute's Top Innovative Practice awards and special recognition for achieving excellence in research and performance. Southern Nuclear's Plant Hatch received the ANS Operations & Power Division's Utility Achievement Award for plant improvements that resulted in a record-setting refueling outage duration. The company's headquarters is in Birmingham, Ala. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/plant-vogtle-marks-30-years-of-reliable-energy-and-community-impact-300467616.html


Clark G.L.,Alabama Power Co
IEEE Power and Energy Magazine | Year: 2014

Restoring service to customers has always been a top priority at the Alabama Power Company during my 45 years there. Although the task is the same, the methods and technologies that can be brought to bear on it have changed and improved dramatically. Technology has helped the company improve its response to system disturbances. Automation technology deployed in the distribution control room, in distribution substations, and at discrete sites along the distribution feeder provides system intelligence regarding the state and condition of the electric distribution system. Automation technology also facilitates the presentation of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) telemetry to the distribution operator. Meanwhile, advances in desktop computing workstations permit the geographical display of distribution circuits in a wide-area view, which improves the visibility of the distribution system for the operator. The big-picture or wide-area view that was once displayed on the paper map board is now presented in the control room on its desktop workstations. Today, application integration is providing the next round of technology improvement in the distribution control room. Advanced applications within an integrated platform are providing techniques to improve the efficiency and reliability of the distribution system. Together, these advanced applications improve service restoration. This article describes the past, present, and future of service restoration technology at Alabama Power. © 2003-2012 IEEE.

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