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Holikatti P.C.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital | Kar N.,Black Country
Education for Health: Change in Learning and Practice | Year: 2015

Background: It is common knowledge that patients seek treatment for psychiatric illnesses from various sources including the alternative medicine. Views and attitudes of clinicians often influence the provision of appropriate mental health care for these patients. In this context, it was intended to study the views of the practitioners of alternative medicine toward psychiatric disorders, patients and interventions. Methods: The study was conducted as a questionnaire-based survey among a sample of practitioners of alternative medicine specifically Ayurveda and Homeopathy, who were practicing in Solapur and adjoining areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka states in India. A semi-structured Attitudinal Inventory for Psychiatry questionnaire was used. Demographic and professional data were collected. Results: Out of 62 practitioners approached, 50 responded (80.6%). There were no significant differences in the views of practitioners toward psychiatry and psychiatrists based on respondents’ gender, place of residence, location of practice, type of alternative medicine, exposure to psychiatric patients, or if they knew someone with psychiatric illness. Attitudes were generally positive, but variable. Among negative observations were that approximately 60% of respondents felt that a patient can be disadvantaged by being given a psychiatric label and 58% believed that emotions are difficult to handle. A considerable proportion (40%) of the respondents felt doctors other than psychiatrists were unable to identify psychiatric disorders. Discussion: This study’s findings suggest that practitioners of alternative medicine have mixed views about mental illness, patients and treatment. Some of their negative views and perceived inability to identify psychiatric disorders may be addressed through further training, information sharing and collaborative work. © 2015, Network: Towards Unity for Health. All rights reserved. Source


Chakraborti D.,Jadavpur University | Rahman M.M.,Jadavpur University | Rahman M.M.,University of South Australia | Murrill M.,Jadavpur University | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2013

This report summarizes recent findings of environmental arsenic (As) contamination and the consequent health effects in a community located near historic gold mining activities in the Mangalur greenstone belt of Karnataka, India. Arsenic contents in water, hair, nail, soil and food were measured by FI-HG-AAS. Elemental analyses of soils were determined by ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry). Of 59 tube-well water samples, 79% had As above 10μgL-1 (maximum 303μgL-1). Of 12 topsoil samples, six were found to contain As greater than 2000mgkg-1 possibly indicating the impact of mine tailings on the area. All hair and nail samples collected from 171 residents contained elevated As. Arsenical skin lesions were observed among 58.6% of a total 181 screened individuals. Histopathological analysis of puncture biopsies of suspected arsenical dermatological symptoms confirmed the diagnosis in three out of four patients. Based on the time-course of As-like symptoms reported by the community as well as the presence of overt arsenicosis, it is hypothesized that the primary route of exposure in the study area was via contaminated groundwater; however, the identified high As content in residential soil could also be a significant source of As exposure via ingestion. Additional studies are required to determine the extent as well as the relative contribution of geologic and anthropogenic factors in environmental As contamination in the region. This study report is to our knowledge one of the first to describe overt arsenicosis in this region of Karnataka, India as well as more broadly an area with underlying greenstone geology and historic mining activity. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source


Holikatti P.C.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital | Kar N.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital
Education for health (Abingdon, England) | Year: 2015

RESULTS: Out of 62 practitioners approached, 50 responded (80.6%). There were no significant differences in the views of practitioners toward psychiatry and psychiatrists based on respondents' gender, place of residence, location of practice, type of alternative medicine, exposure to psychiatric patients, or if they knew someone with psychiatric illness. Attitudes were generally positive, but variable. Among negative observations were that approximately 60% of respondents felt that a patient can be disadvantaged by being given a psychiatric label and 58% believed that emotions are difficult to handle. A considerable proportion (40%) of the respondents felt doctors other than psychiatrists were unable to identify psychiatric disorders.METHODS: The study was conducted as a questionnaire-based survey among a sample of practitioners of alternative medicine specifically Ayurveda and Homeopathy, who were practicing in Solapur and adjoining areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka states in India. A semi-structured Attitudinal Inventory for Psychiatry questionnaire was used. Demographic and professional data were collected.DISCUSSION: This study's findings suggest that practitioners of alternative medicine have mixed views about mental illness, patients and treatment. Some of their negative views and perceived inability to identify psychiatric disorders may be addressed through further training, information sharing and collaborative work.BACKGROUND: It is common knowledge that patients seek treatment for psychiatric illnesses from various sources including the alternative medicine. Views and attitudes of clinicians often influence the provision of appropriate mental health care for these patients. In this context, it was intended to study the views of the practitioners of alternative medicine toward psychiatric disorders, patients and interventions. Source


Sasnur A.H.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital | Sasnur P.A.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital | Ghaus-Ul R.S.M.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital
Indian Journal of Orthopaedics | Year: 2011

Congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare reported entity characterised by disturbance in the pain and temperature perception due to involvement of the autonomic and sensory nervous system. It is an autosomal recessive trait with several defects of the gene NTRK1 coding for the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase - a nerve growth factor receptor on chromosome 1q21-q22. Traumatic fractures are common and, because of lack of pain, may go unrecognised for prolonged periods, resulting in nonunion or pseudoarthrosis. A Charcot joint may be the end result. Treatment complications are very common in these patients and range from infection to wound breakdown to failure of fixation. We report here a rare case of CIPA in a 9-year-old girl and her younger male sibling with generalised absence of pain, anhidrosis and its orthopaedic implications. Source


Aslam M.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital | Dhundasi S.A.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital | Siddiq M.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital | Kulkarni B.R.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital | Das K.K.,Al Ameen Medical College and Hospital
Biomedicine (India) | Year: 2013

Objectives: Deficits in the area of learning and memory are among the most frequently reported neuropsychological finding in people with obsessive-compulsive disorder. The objectives of this study were to assess the short-term memory status in patients of obsessive-compulsive disorder and to compare the same with age and sex matched literate controls of north Karnataka (India). Methods: 15 obsessive compulsive disorder patients were randomly selected with 47.7 + 3.48 (Mean + SEM) and compared with age and sex matched normal literate controls individually for this study. Short-term memory status was assessed by using cognitive tasks, which included verbal tasks (non word repetition task, digit span test and word span test), and visual tasks (Benton visual retention test and object test). Results: The obsessive-compulsive disorder patients were found to be more affected in most of the verbal and visual task methods compared to normal controls. Conclusion: Poor performance of verbal and visual memory tasks by the patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder might be at the level of working memory, motor speed, delayed encoding process and execution. Source

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