St. Louis, MO, United States

Akermin Incorporated

www.akermin.com
St. Louis, MO, United States

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Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2015-02-18

The present invention generally relates to processes and methods for the capture of carbon dioxide from gases that are produced by various industrial processes including the capture of CO_(2 )from flue gases after the combustion of carbon-based fuels.


Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2013-03-15

The present invention generally relates to improvements in enzyme immobilization, particularly for use in the field of carbon dioxide capture and sequestering. It has been discovered that the utilization of sol-gel processes to immobilize enzymes in polysilicate-polysilicone copolymer coatings and particles, and the deposition of these coatings on solid state supports or use of suspensions of these particles, provides significant benefits for use in industrial applications involving enzymatic catalysts.


Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2014-10-09

The present invention generally relates to carbonic anhydrase xerogel particles comprising a polysilicate-polysilicone copolymer and carbonic anhydrase. The carbonic anhydrase xerogel particles can be used for carbon dioxide capture.


Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2012-05-10

The present invention generally relates to the removal of carbon dioxide from a gas stream, particularly a flue gas, hydrogen gas from a reformer, natural gas, or gas from a cement kiln. Immobilized enzymes for use in carbon capture and other systems are also disclosed.


Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2011-08-15

The present invention generally relates to the removal of carbon dioxide from a gas stream, particularly a flue gas, hydrogen gas from a reformer, natural gas, or gas from a cement kiln. Immobilized enzymes for use in carbon capture and other systems are also disclosed.


Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2013-06-06

The present invention generally relates to immobilized biocatalysts or immobilized enzymes for use in carbon capture and sequestration technology. Thiol-ene chemistry is used to couple a biocatalyst, particularly carbonic anhydrase, to a substrate including a substrate, a solid support, a microparticle, a nanoparticle, or a combination thereof.


Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2014-10-23

The present invention generally relates to improvements in enzyme immobilization, particularly for use in the field of carbon dioxide capture and sequestering. It has been discovered that the utilization of sol-gel processes to immobilize enzymes in polysilicate-polysilicone copolymer coatings and particles, and the deposition of these coatings on solid state supports or use of suspensions of these particles, provides significant benefits for use in industrial applications involving enzymatic catalysts.


Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2012-03-08

The present invention generally relates to immobilized enzymes for use in carbon capture and other systems; particularly, materials used to immobilize carbonic anhydrase are disclosed.


Patent
Akermin Incorporated | Date: 2014-07-10

The present invention generally relates to the removal of carbon dioxide from a gas stream, particularly a flue gas, hydrogen gas from a reformer, natural gas, or gas from a cement kiln. Immobilized enzymes for use in carbon capture and other systems are also disclosed.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 146.84K | Year: 2010

This SBIR Phase I project will develop an enzymatic bio-fuel cell using a unique enzyme stabilization technology. The technology overcomes the stability and lifetime issues faced by conventional bio-fuel cells where rare metals serve as the catalyst. Development of the bioanode for the fuel cell power supply is based on Akermin?s proprietary enzyme stabilization technology. Such a fuel cell can be used for many lower power devices, including microelectrical mechanical devices, unattended ground sensors, and small mobile power devices. This technology has advantages over similar competing technologies (i.e., batteries and conventional fuel cells) when addressing the needs of small remote sensors and electronics. The broader/commercial impacts of the proposed project will be: 1. that it will be environment friendly because a successful enzyme-based fuel cell holds the promise of replacing batteries currently used in many applications including remote sensing and human implants; 2. it will provide improved power supplies for both remote sensors and drug delivery devices that would be a significant benefit to society; and 3. the proposed product has reasonable commercial potential and potential customers have been identified.

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