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Uppsala, Sweden

Two patients presented with intense pain in the shoulder followed by weakness and paralysis of muscles in the shoulder and arm, together with a peculiar swelling on the hand. The swelling seems to predispose to rupture of the extensor tendon. If this tumour is a regular finding in Parsonage-Turner syndrome, it may also help in making a definitive diagnosis. © 2012 Informa Healthcare. Source


Nilsson A.E.,Karolinska Institutet | Carlsson S.,Karolinska Institutet | Johansson E.,Akademiska Sjukhuset | Jonsson M.N.,Karolinska Institutet | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Sexual Medicine | Year: 2011

Introduction. Involuntary release of urine during sexual climax, orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, occurs frequently after radical prostatectomy. We know little about its prevalence and its effect on sexual satisfaction. Aim. To determine the prevalence of orgasm-associated incontinence after radical prostatectomy and its effect on sexual satisfaction. Methods. Consecutive series, follow-up at one point in calendar time of men having undergone radical prostatectomy (open surgery or robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery) at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, 2002-2006. Of the 1,411 eligible men, 1,288 (91%) men completed a study-specific questionnaire. Main Outcome Measure. Prevalence rate of orgasm-associated incontinence. Results. Of the 1,288 men providing information, 691 were sexually active. Altogether, 268 men reported orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, of whom 230 (86%) were otherwise continent. When comparing them with the 422 not reporting the symptom but being sexually active, we found a prevalence ratio (with 95% confidence interval) of 1.5 (1.2-1.8) for not being able to satisfy the partner, 2.1 (1.1-3.5) for avoiding sexual activity because of fear of failing, 1.5 (1.1-2.1) for low orgasmic satisfaction, and 1.4 (1.2-1.7) for having sexual intercourse infrequently. Prevalence ratios increase in prostate-cancer survivors with a higher frequency of orgasm-associated urinary incontinence. Conclusion. We found orgasm-associated urinary incontinence to occur among a fifth of prostate cancer survivors having undergone radical prostatectomy, most of whom are continent when not engaged in sexual activity. The symptom was associated with several aspects of sexual life. Nilsson AE, Carlsson S, Johansson E, Jonsson MN, Adding C, Nyberg T, Steineck G, and Wiklund NP. Orgasm-associated urinary incontinence and sexual life after radical prostatectomy. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Source


Gonzalez-Pizarro P.,Akademiska Sjukhuset | Garcia-Fernandez J.,Puerta Of Hierro University Hospital | Canfran S.,Complutense University of Madrid | Gilsanz F.,Hospital Universitario La Paz
Respiratory Care | Year: 2016

Background: Causing pneumothorax is one of the main concerns of lung recruitment maneuvers in pediatric patients, especially newborns. Therefore, these maneuvers are not performed routinely during anesthesia. Our objective was to determine the pressures that cause pneumothorax in healthy newborns by a prospective experimental study of 10 newborn piglets (<48 h old) with healthy lungs under general anesthesia. Methods: The primary outcome was peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) causing pneumothorax. Animals under anesthesia and bilateral chest tube catheterization were randomly allocated to 2 groups: one with PEEP and fixed inspiratory driving pressure of 15 cm H2O (PEEP group) and the second one with PEEP = 0 cm H2O and non-fixed inspiratory driving pressure (zero PEEP group). In both groups, the ventilation mode was pressure-controlled, and PIP was raised at 2-min intervals, with steps of 5 cm H2O until air leak was observed through the chest tubes. The PEEP group raised PIP through 5-cm H2O PEEP increments, and the zero PEEP group raised PIP through 5-cm H2O inspiratory driving pressure increments. RESULTS: Pneumothorax was observed with a PIP of 90.5 ± 15.7 cm H2O with no statistically significant differences between the PEEP group (92 ± 14.8 cm H2O) and the zero PEEP group (89 ± 18.2 cm H2O). The zero PEEP group had hypotension, with a PIP of 35 cm H2O; the PEEP group had hypotension, with a PIP of 60 cm H2O (P = .01). The zero PEEP group presented bradycardia, with PIP of 40 cm H2O; the PEEP group presented bradycardia, with PIP of 70 cm H2O (P = .002). Conclusions: Performing recruitment maneuvers in newborns without lung disease is a safe procedure in terms of pneumothorax. Pneumothorax does not seem to occur in the clinically relevant PIPs of <50 cm H2O. Hemodynamic impairment may occur with high driving pressures. More studies are needed to determine the exact hemodynamic impact of these procedures and pneumothorax PIP in poorly compliant lungs. © 2016 Daedalus Enterprises. Source


Rhodin A.,Akademiska Sjukhuset
Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2013

Chronic pelvic pain is a common, multifactorial complaint that affects both women and men, causing disability and frustration for patients. The exact aetiology remains unknown, although several theories have been proposed. Assessment should be undertaken with care and compassion, while considering the sensitive nature of the area. Management involves ruling out treatable pathology concomitant with strategies to control pain. Novel treatment approaches have been investigated for specific clinical scenarios. The more severe CPP cases are best managed using a multidisciplinary approach. Management requires good integration and knowledge of all pelvic organ systems and including musculoskeletal, neurologic and psychological mechanisms. © 2013 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc. Source


Poveda A.,Valencian Institute of Oncology | Vergote I.,University Hospital | Tjulandin S.,Russian Cancer Research Center | Kong B.,Shandong University | And 12 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2011

Background: OVA-301 is a large randomized trial that showed superiority of trabectedin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) over PLD alone in relapsed ovarian cancer. The optimal management of patients with partially platinum-sensitive relapse [6-12 months platinum-free interval (PFI)] is unclear. Patients and methods: Within OVA-301, we therefore now report on the outcomes for the 214 cases in this subgroup. Results: Trabectedin/PLD resulted in a 35% risk reduction of disease progression (DP) or death [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.45-0.92; P = 0.0152; median progression-free survival (PFS) 7.4 versus 5.5 months], and a significant 41% decrease in the risk of death (HR = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.43-0.82; P = 0.0015; median survival 23.0 versus 17.1 months). The safety of trabectedin/PLD in this subset mimicked that of the overall population. Similar proportions of patients received subsequent therapy in each arm (76% versus 77%), although patients in the trabectedin/PLD arm had a slightly lower proportion of further platinum (49% versus 55%). Importantly, patients in the trabectedin/PLD arm survived significantly longer after subsequent platinum (HR = 0.63; P = 0.0357; median 13.3 versus 9.8 months). Conclusion: This hypothesis-generating analysis demonstrates that superior benefits with trabectedin/PLD in terms of PFS and survival in the overall population appear particularly enhanced in patients with partially sensitive disease (PFI 6-12 months). © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. Source

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