Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Ibi, Spain

Martin-Sanjose J.-F.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Juan M.-C.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Torres E.,AIJU | Vicent M.J.,Polytechnic University of Valencia
Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments | Year: 2014

Playful interactions facilitate the development of engaging applications for different purposes. This aspect is very important for serious games, and especially when these games are for children. Another aspect to consider is the interaction among children, which could be a great reinforcement in learning environments. Children enjoy playing, and they like playing with other children. This relationship could encourage their motivation and their learning outcomes. In this paper, a playful interaction system for learning about a period of history is presented. The interaction of the system was achieved using natural gestures and the visualization was autostereoscopic. A study was carried out to determine whether their learning outcomes were greater playing collaboratively or playing individually. Forty six children from 7 to 10 years old participated in the study. The analysis of the pre-tests and the post-tests indicate that the children increased their knowledge about historical periods after playing with the two modes. Therefore, the game could be used as an effective transmitter of knowledge both collaboratively and individually. When the post-knowledge scores for the two modes were compared, statistically significant differences were found in favor of the collaborative mode. Therefore, the collaborative mode facilitates learning to a greater extent than the individual mode. The rest of the questions indicated that the children had a lot of fun while playing the game; they found the game easy to play; they would recommend the game to their friends; and they scored the game as a mean of 9.57 over 10. Finally, we believe that the combination of playful interaction and autostereoscopy is an option that should be exploited not only for the development of computer-supported learning systems, but also for the development of systems for different purposes. © 2014 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. Source


Martin-Sanjose J.-F.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Juan M.-C.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Gil-Gomez J.-A.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Rando N.,AIJU
Science of Computer Programming | Year: 2014

The latest video game and entertainment technology and other technologies are facilitating the development of new and powerful e-Learning systems. In this paper, we present a computer-based game for learning about five historical ages. The objective of the game is to reinforce the events that mark the transition from one historical age to another and the order of the historical ages. Our game incorporates natural human-computer interaction based on video game technology, Frontal Projection, and personalized learning. For personalized learning, a Flexible Learning Itinerary has been included, where the children can decide how to direct the flow of their own learning process. For comparison, a Linear Learning Itinerary has also been included, where the children follow a determined learning flow. A study to compare the two different learning itineraries was carried out. Twenty nine children from 8 to 9 years old participated in the study. The analysis of the pre-tests and the post-tests determined that children learned the contents of a game about historical ages. The results show that there were no statistically significant differences between the two learning itineraries. Therefore, our study reveals the potential of computer-based learning games as a tool in the learning process for both flexible and linear itineraries. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Source


Martin-Sanjose J.-F.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Juan M.-C.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Segui I.,AIJU | Garcia-Garcia I.,Polytechnic University of Valencia
Computers and Education | Year: 2015

As new technologies have emerged in the last few years, the learning process has been changing. New and powerful e-learning systems are being developed and new teaching methods can be used in classrooms. In this paper, we present a computer-based game with an educational background that is played on a large-size tabletop display. The game can be used as reinforcement for educational content related to historical ages. The game uses natural interaction. A study to compare the traditional learning method with a collaborative learning method using the game was carried out. A group of up to 12 children could learn together using the game. The experience of children in large groups was also compared with the experience of children playing in pairs. One hundred children between 8 and 11 years old participated in the study; they were divided into three groups (LGroup, Pairs, TClass). When the pre-test and the post-test results were compared, it was shown that the children learned the contents in all three groups. The results also showed that there were statistically significant differences between the traditional method and the game played in a large group in favour of children who played the game in the large group. The knowledge acquired was independent from gender and age. There were no statistically significant differences between learning in large groups or learning in pairs. In both cases, the children expressed their satisfaction for the game and found it easy to use. Therefore, playing games of this type collaboratively in large groups or in pairs can be a valuable learning method that can be combined with traditional methods. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Furio D.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Juan M.-C.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Segui I.,AIJU | Vivo R.,Polytechnic University of Valencia
Journal of Computer Assisted Learning | Year: 2015

Different methods can be used for learning, and they can be compared in several aspects, especially those related to learning outcomes. In this paper, we present a study in order to compare the learning effectiveness and satisfaction of children using an iPhone game for learning the water cycle vs. the traditional classroom lesson. The iPhone game includes multiple interaction forms and combined augmented reality (AR) mini-games with non-AR mini-games. The traditional classroom lesson had the same learning content as the iPhone game. Thirty-eight children participated in the study. The analyses showed that the children made significant learning gains about the water cycle, regardless of the method used. Even though the results showed that the iPhone method achieved higher knowledge results than the traditional classroom lesson, no statistically significant differences were found between the iPhone and the classroom lesson. When analysing the motivational outcomes, the results showed that the children found the iPhone game to be more satisfying than the classroom lessons. Since the iPhone game achieved similar learning results and a higher motivational effect than the classroom lesson, this suggests that games of this kind could be used as a tool in primary schools to reinforce students' lessons. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source


Gonzalez-Gancedo S.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Juan M.-C.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Segui I.,AIJU | Abad F.,Polytechnic University of Valencia
GRAPP 2013 IVAPP 2013 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Graphics Theory and Applications and International Conference on Information Visualization Theory and Applications | Year: 2013

This paper presents a comparative study between tangible user interfaces (TUIs) and tactile user interfaces (TacUIs) in handheld AR, with a contribution to the state of the art in HCI oriented to children. While TUIs work with the manipulation of physical objects, TacUIs work with virtual representations of them. In our evaluations to compare these two interactions with primary school children, we found that the TacUI was the fastest for completing the task, what makes it better suited for educational purposes. The TacUI was found easier to use by the children, although the TUI was found more solid and less slippery. Our conclusions should be of interest not only to educational researchers, but also to the general HCI community working on tangible and tactile interfaces. Source

Discover hidden collaborations