Boshi Aiiku Kai Aiiku Hospital

Gaizhou, China

Boshi Aiiku Kai Aiiku Hospital

Gaizhou, China

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Mimura A.,Boshi Aiiku Kai Aiiku Hospital
[Nippon kōshū eisei zasshi] Japanese journal of public health | Year: 2010

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the educational effects of a single leaflet distributed once without explanation of its content. METHODS: All the 58 seniors on a dietitian course and all the 81 students who took "health and nutrition" as their elective in a women's university in F Prefecture were recruited. They were assigned to intervention or control groups. Both groups were asked the following choice questions in a baseline survey: "What do you think about alcohol drinking during pregnancy?" "What do you suppose you yourself will do in the future?" and "Do you know about the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)?" One month later, a leaflet was distributed to the intervention group only. One week after the distribution, a second questionnaire was administered to both groups. The leaflet and the two questionnaires were distributed and collected during class with the help of teaching staff. The leaflet was made by a NPO and it recommended stopping drinking when planning to become pregnant. RESULTS: The participation rate was 83%. There were no significant associations between groups and grades, current drinking habit, and learning experience on this topic. Almost 80% of the intervention group read the leaflet. Change in their thinking about drinking during pregnancy before and after the intervention did not significantly differ between the two groups. Compared to 57 controls, 66 students who received the leaflet showed significant improved changes in their attitudes toward drinking during pregnancy and the knowledge about FAS. CONCLUSIONS: No significant change in their thinking about drinking during pregnancy could be due to the fact that, even before the intervention, nearly 80% of the students thought pregnant women must abstain from alcohol entirely. This might be related to the sample characteristics, since 75% of them were majoring in nutrition. The improvement in attitudes was considered to reflect the content of the leaflet. In the intervention group, the percentage of the students who chose the alternative of "I plan to stop drinking when I wish to get pregnant" increased as the leaflet recommended and more than half of them said they learned about FAS by this leaflet. To sum up, even a single distribution of a leaflet in a school setting had educational effects which improved attitude and knowledge. Since the current sample seemed to have particular knowledge and interest in health, it is now necessary to examine effects of the same approach in the general population.


PubMed | Boshi Aiiku Kai Aiiku Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: [Nihon koshu eisei zasshi] Japanese journal of public health | Year: 2010

To evaluate the educational effects of a single leaflet distributed once without explanation of its content.All the 58 seniors on a dietitian course and all the 81 students who took health and nutrition as their elective in a womens university in F Prefecture were recruited. They were assigned to intervention or control groups. Both groups were asked the following choice questions in a baseline survey: What do you think about alcohol drinking during pregnancy? What do you suppose you yourself will do in the future? and Do you know about the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)? One month later, a leaflet was distributed to the intervention group only. One week after the distribution, a second questionnaire was administered to both groups. The leaflet and the two questionnaires were distributed and collected during class with the help of teaching staff. The leaflet was made by a NPO and it recommended stopping drinking when planning to become pregnant.The participation rate was 83%. There were no significant associations between groups and grades, current drinking habit, and learning experience on this topic. Almost 80% of the intervention group read the leaflet. Change in their thinking about drinking during pregnancy before and after the intervention did not significantly differ between the two groups. Compared to 57 controls, 66 students who received the leaflet showed significant improved changes in their attitudes toward drinking during pregnancy and the knowledge about FAS.No significant change in their thinking about drinking during pregnancy could be due to the fact that, even before the intervention, nearly 80% of the students thought pregnant women must abstain from alcohol entirely. This might be related to the sample characteristics, since 75% of them were majoring in nutrition. The improvement in attitudes was considered to reflect the content of the leaflet. In the intervention group, the percentage of the students who chose the alternative of I plan to stop drinking when I wish to get pregnant increased as the leaflet recommended and more than half of them said they learned about FAS by this leaflet. To sum up, even a single distribution of a leaflet in a school setting had educational effects which improved attitude and knowledge. Since the current sample seemed to have particular knowledge and interest in health, it is now necessary to examine effects of the same approach in the general population.

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