Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC

Campinas, Brazil

Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC

Campinas, Brazil

Time filter

Source Type

PubMed | Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Federal University of Pampa, Biological Institute, University of Campinas and Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC
Type: Journal Article | Journal: FEMS microbiology ecology | Year: 2016

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are well described and recommended for several crops worldwide. However, one of the most common problems in research into them is the difficulty in obtaining reproducible results. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated plant growth promotion and soil microbial community composition resulting from bacterial inoculation under field conditions. Here we evaluated the effect of 54 Pseudomonas strains on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) growth. The 12 most promising strains were phylogenetically and physiologically characterized for plant growth-promoting traits, including phosphate solubilization, hormone production and antagonism to pathogen compounds, and their effect on plant growth under farm field conditions. Additionally, the impact of beneficial strains on the rhizospheric bacterial community was evaluated for inoculated plants. The strains IAC-RBcr4 and IAC-RBru1, with different plant growth promoting traits, improved lettuce plant biomass yields up to 30%. These two strains also impacted rhizosphere bacterial groups including Isosphaera and Pirellula (phylum Planctomycetes) and Acidothermus, Pseudolabrys and Singusphaera (phylum Actinobacteria). This is the first study to demonstrate consistent results for the effects of Pseudomonas strains on lettuce growth promotion for seedlings and plants grown under tropical field conditions.


Rodrigues N.P.,University of Campinas | Salva T.D.J.G.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | Bragagnolo N.,University of Campinas
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2015

The influence of green coffee genotype on the bioactive compounds and the in vitro antioxidant capacity against the principal reactive oxygen (ROO•, H2O2, HO•, and HOCl) and nitrogen (NO• and ONOO-) species of biological relevance was investigated. This is the first report on the capacity of green coffee to scavenge H2O2, HOCl, and NO•. Variations in the contents of total chlorogenic acids (22.9-37.9 g/100 g), cinnamoyl-amino acid conjugates (0.03-1.12 g/100 g), trigonelline (3.1-6.7 g/100 g), and caffeine (3.9-11.8 g/100 g) were found. Hydrophilic extracts of Coffea canephora and Coffea kapakata were the most potent scavengers of ROO•, H2O2, HO•, NO•, and ONOO- due to their chlorogenic acid contents, which were, on average, 30% higher than those found in Coffea arabica and Coffea racemosa. The results showed that genotype is a determinant characteristic in the bioactive compound contents and consequently in the antioxidant capacity of green coffee. © 2015 American Chemical Society.


Rendon M.Y.,University of Campinas | De Jesus Garcia Salva T.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | Bragagnolo N.,University of Campinas
Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

Sensory changes during the storage of coffee beans occur mainly due to lipid oxidation and are responsible for the loss of commercial value. This work aimed to verify how sensory changes of natural coffee and pulped natural coffee are related to the oxidative processes during 15 months of storage. During this period, changes in the content of free fatty acids (1.4-3.8 mg/g oil), TBARS values (8.8-10.2 nmol MDA/g), and carbonyl groups (2.6-3.5 nmol/mg of protein) occurred. The intensity of "rested coffee flavour" in the coffee brew increased (2.1-6.7) and 5-caffeoylquinic acid concentration decreased (5.2-4.6 g/100 g). Losses were also observed in seed viability, colour of the beans and cellular structure. All the results of the chemical analyses are coherent with the oxidative process that occurred in the grains during storage. Therefore, oxidation would be also responsible for the loss of cellular structure, seed viability and sensory changes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Veiga J.P.S.,University of Campinas | Veiga J.P.S.,University of Sao Paulo | Valle T.L.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | Feltran J.C.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | Bizzo W.A.,University of Campinas
Renewable Energy | Year: 2016

This study sought to quantify and characterize cassava waste as fuel. The wastes from three cultivars were collected to study and were divided into three distinct parts of the cassava plant: seed stem, thick stalks, and thin stalks. Physical and chemical analyzes were carried out to determine the elemental composition of the waste: volatile matter; fixed carbon; ash; moisture; lignin; cellulose; hemicellulose; ash composition and higher heating value were determined. We conducted a thermogravimetric analysis in oxidizing and inert atmospheres to study the behavior of the waste as fuel. The root productivity obtained ranged from 7.7 to 13.0 t ha-1 yr-1 on a dry basis (db), and the ratio between waste and roots varied from 0.36 to 0.91. The physical and chemical properties of cassava waste are analogous to those of woody biomass regarding the elemental composition, the higher heating value, and thermogravimetric analysis. Ash content varied from 2.5% to 3.5%, reaching around 6.0% in samples unwashed. Approximately 60% of the ashes are alkali oxides, especially P2O5, K2O, and CaO, which have low melting points. The alkali index calculated suggests that there is a strong tendency that the combustion process leads to ash fouling and the formation of ash deposits. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


Vidal-Vazquez E.,University of La Coruña | Paz-Ferreiro J.,Technical University of Madrid | Vieira S.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | Topp G.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | And 2 more authors.
Soil Science | Year: 2012

There is an increasing interest in quantifying the space-time variation of soil properties. This issue offers a unique set of problems that have been addressed using various methods. Here, the spatial and temporal scaling behavior of topsoil water content at the field scale was explored using the fractal approach. Results from fractal analysis were compared with those from other methods describing either spatial variability or temporal trends and stability of soil moisture. Time domain reflectometry probes were installed at the 0- to 20-cm depth in a clay loam soil under natural pasture in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Soil water content was measured 34 times at 164 points on a square grid with 10-m spacing. Mean soil water content and coefficients of variation showed significant negative linear relationship for both sampling dates (r = 0.783) and sampling points (r = 0.804). Both spatial and temporal data sets were characterized by a self-affine fractal Brownian motion model that requires two parameters, fractal dimension, D, and crossover length, l. For spatially sampled data sets at different times, D ranged from 2.589 to 2.910 and l ranged from 0.95 to 6.97 m. For temporal data sets measured on 10-m grid nodes, D was between 1.145 and 1.919 and l was from 0.069 to 9.40 days. Fractal analysis added information on the scale dependence of spatially and temporally sampled data sets, which is not taken into account by classical statistics. Also, interpretation of fractal parameters provided further insight when contrasted with temporal stability analysis. Fractal dimension and crossover length of temporal series showed spatial dependence, and ordinary kriging was used to map these two fractal parameters. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Bosetti F.,University of Sao Paulo | Imaculada Zucchi M.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | Baldin Pinheiro J.,University of Sao Paulo
Plant Genetic Resources: Characterisation and Utilisation | Year: 2011

Germplasm molecular and phenotypic characterization is instrumental to its utilization and to genetic variability incorporation into rice breeding programmes. The diversity within 192 Japanese rice accessions was analysed for 22 agro-morphological traits and 24 single sequence repeat markers. A total of 181 alleles were detected, 38 of which were exclusive. The number of alleles/marker ranged from 2 to 16, with an average of 7.54 alleles/locus and the He value ranged from 0.01 to 0.82, with an average of 0.46. The accessions showed diversity at molecular and phenotypic level and few showed also good agronomic performance. Tocher's method applied on a total-dissimilarity matrix was used to determine cluster formation of 13 diversity groups. Most of the accessions (81%) were clustered within a group, whereas eight accessions (Kyuushuu, Eika Ine, Ishiwari Mochi, Col/Fukui/1965, Ookuma Nishiki, Suzume Shirazu, Iwate Ryoon and Toga) did not cluster with other accessions. © 2011 NIAB.


Agbenin J.O.,Ahmadu Bello University | Agbenin J.O.,Botswana College of Agriculture | Cantarella H.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC
Accreditation and Quality Assurance | Year: 2011

A soil proficiency test (PT) was administered to 50 participant laboratories in which two sets of samples, consisting of 20 yearly PT samples and 5 'blind' samples in clients' names were analyzed for pH, organic matter, total acidity, extractable calcium, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus by the laboratories. Our objective was to determine whether laboratories take extra care to analyze clients' samples as they do with regular PT samples. The analytical data were evaluated essentially by the procedure described in the international harmonized protocol for proficiency testing of analytical chemistry laboratories. Performance of participant laboratories was assessed by z-scores and summary z-scores statistics involving sum of squared z-scores interpreted as chi-square χ 2 n distribution for zero-centered z-scores with unit variance. From 8 750 determinations, outliers and stragglers accounted for less than 2% of the entire data. Over 93% of the data were satisfactory, whereas between 2 and 4% were either unsatisfactory or questionable in both the PT and 'blind' tests. On the basis of sum of squared z-scores interpreted from χ 2 n distribution table, between 30 and 40% of the laboratories had more than 90% probability of having their measurement data within the robust mean and standard deviation for each soil parameter, while another 30-42% of the laboratories had less than 50% probability of having measurement data within the robust mean and standard deviation. Overall, 21 laboratories (42%) were ranked in Class A either in the PT or 'blind' tests out of which 12 of them (57%) retained this ranking in both tests. Fourteen laboratories (28%) were ranked in Class C in either the PT or 'blind' tests with only 5 of them (36%) consistently ranking in this class in both tests. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


da Silva Dias R.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | da Silva Dias R.,University of La Coruña | de Abreu C.A.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | de Abreu M.F.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC | And 3 more authors.
Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis | Year: 2013

Soil carbon (C) determinations are important for soil quality assessment. The standard method that is used in São Paulo state to determine soil organic C is a modified Walkely-Black method. This method has some disadvantages because of the time needed for implementation and the use of potassium dichromate. Therefore, the aims of this work were to test the efficiency and compare the following methods: (a) wet oxidation of organic C (OC-HO) followed by spectrophotometer determination, (b) dry incineration at 550 °C with a muffle furnace plus gravimetric determination (TC-I), and (c) dry combustion with a C-nitrogen (N)-sulfur (S) elemental analyzer (TC-EA). Sixty-one soil samples were collected at the 0- to 20-cm depth on agricultural soils of São Paulo state. Samples were dried at 65 °C, ground, and sieved through a 0.09-mm sieve. Carbon content was determined in triplicate. These sets of samples exhibited a wide range of C content: TC-EA was from 0.43 to 9.14 g 100 g-1. Mean C contents were 6.76 g 100 g-1, 2.31 g 100 g-1, and 2.52 g 100 g-1 for TC-I, OC-HO, and TC-EA, respectively. Moreover, in all the studied soil samples, the TC-I method overestimated the C content when compared with OC-HO and TC-EA methods. Losses of structural water and inorganic colloidal compounds, such as gibbsite, induced by high temperature during incineration probably were responsible for the greater C contents obtained by the TC-I method. Correlation coefficients between the three methods were rather similar: TC-I and TC-EA (r = 0.87), TC and OC-HO (r = 0.83), and TC-EA and OC-HO (r = 0.84). It was concluded that C extraction by the standard, routinely employed OC-HO method can be replaced by the TC-EA method, which has environmental advantages. © 2013 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Figueiredo P.G.,São Paulo State University | de Moraes-Dallaqua M.A.,São Paulo State University | Bicudo S.J.,São Paulo State University | Tanamati F.Y.,São Paulo State University | Aguiar E.B.,Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC
Plant Production Science | Year: 2015

The interaction between the roots of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and soil physical properties has previously been analyzed. This interaction results in differences in production of plant material and in the physicochemical features of the roots, suggesting that changes in soil physical conditions may be related to changes in root anatomy. This work described the anatomical development of the tuberous cassava roots (cv. IAC 576-70) under different tillage systems. Roots grown under three different tillage systems (minimum, conventional and no tillage) were examined at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days after planting (DAP). The tillage systems did not appear to influence root anatomy during root development; at 15 and 30 DAP roots had early secondary growth; at 60 DAP the process of tuber formation had started; at 90 DAP the secondary xylem had completely differentiated to allow storage of starch; at 120, 150 and 180 DAP roots exhibited a similar anatomical structure to that observed at 90 DAP. From these results we conclude that the anatomical structure of cassava tuberous roots is established by 90 DAP and the sequence of establishment and development of tissues that make up the tuberous roots is not influenced by tillage systems during the first 180 DAP. © 2015, Crop Science Society of Japan. All rights reserved.


PubMed | University of Campinas and Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of agricultural and food chemistry | Year: 2015

The influence of green coffee genotype on the bioactive compounds and the in vitro antioxidant capacity against the principal reactive oxygen (ROO(), H2O2, HO(), and HOCl) and nitrogen (NO() and ONOO(-)) species of biological relevance was investigated. This is the first report on the capacity of green coffee to scavenge H2O2, HOCl, and NO(). Variations in the contents of total chlorogenic acids (22.9-37.9 g/100 g), cinnamoyl-amino acid conjugates (0.03-1.12 g/100 g), trigonelline (3.1-6.7 g/100 g), and caffeine (3.9-11.8 g/100 g) were found. Hydrophilic extracts of Coffea canephora and Coffea kapakata were the most potent scavengers of ROO(), H2O2, HO(), NO(), and ONOO(-) due to their chlorogenic acid contents, which were, on average, 30% higher than those found in Coffea arabica and Coffea racemosa. The results showed that genotype is a determinant characteristic in the bioactive compound contents and consequently in the antioxidant capacity of green coffee.

Loading Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC collaborators
Loading Agronomic Institute of Campinas IAC collaborators