Agromet Vision

Bruchem, Netherlands

Agromet Vision

Bruchem, Netherlands
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Stigter K.,Agromet Vision | Walker S.,Crops for the Future Research Center
Italian Journal of Agrometeorology | Year: 2014

Meeting the needs for agrometeorological services, including agroclimatological services, in the livelihood of farmers is the focus of this paper in four Parts. This ideally leads to agrometeorological services for response farming with irrigation scheduling, early warnings, microclimate manipulation, and application of weather and climate forecasts in a changing and increasingly variable climate. In this first Part, some historical aspects are dealt with in the introduction, particularly regarding the definition and scope of agrometeorology. What has recently been said about such services is exemplified, including examples from South Africa, Cuba, Zambia and India.


Stigter K.,Agromet Vision | Dawei Z.,China Agricultural University | Jing L.,Ningxia Meteorological Research Institute | Chunqian L.,Hebei Institute of Meteorological science | And 9 more authors.
Italian Journal of Agrometeorology | Year: 2015

Meeting the needs for agrometeorological services, including agrodimatological services, in the livelihood of farmers is the focus of this paper in four Parts. This last Part deals with ten historical case studies to illustrate some best examples of agrometeorological services. They are about: Shelterbelt design for protection of irrigation canals and agricultural land from blown sand encroachment; Design of improved underground storage pits (matmuras) for sorghum in cracking clays; Design of sand settlement of windblown sand using local trees and grasses; Agrometeorological service for irrigation advice; Frost forecast service; Design of protection of sloping land from soil loss and water run-off using hedgerow intercropping; Improving microclimate for water melon by covering sandy soils with pebbles; Winter straw mulching increasing water use efficiency and yields in winter wheat; Forecasting fungus disease conditions for wolfberries; and Early warning of low temperatures and less sunshine for crops in plastic greenhouses in winter. © 2015, Patron Editore S.r.l. All rights reserved.


Stigter K.,Agromet Vision | Walker S.,Crops for the Future Research Center | Das H.,Mont Vert II Pashan Sus Road | Huda S.,University of Sydney | Haasbroek P.D.,Farmsecure
Italian Journal of Agrometeorology | Year: 2014

Meeting the needs for agrometeorological services, including agroclimatological services, in the livelihood of farmers is the focus of this paper in four Parts. Much was already reported by us on the context of farmers’ needs for agrometeorological services. We therefore use now in this second Part some recent reviews of this context in which we recognize that of our own approaches. These reviews deal with the existing situation in Africa, Asia and Latin America from angles of water/fertility/markets (Africa), traditional, conventional/intensive and organic farming (Asia) and operational frameworks that provide agrometeorological information to farmers, extension services and other stakeholders with some emphasis on internet information (Latin America). Examples from Australia, India and South Africa strengthen the arguments. © 2014 Patron Editore S.r.l. All rights reserved.


Stigter K.,Agromet Vision | Walker S.,Crops for the Future Research Center | Das H.,Mont Vert II
Italian Journal of Agrometeorology | Year: 2014

Meeting the needs of agrometeorological information for the livelihood of farmers is the focus of this paper in four Parts. In this third Part, the future is dealt with from the point of view of agroforestry and communication in agrometeorology as connecting principles for the reviews in Part II. Targeted capacity building initiatives are an essential component of the communication process. Farmer/Climate/Science Field Schools/Shops appear to have large potentials here. These are the ultimate new educational commitments with which new agrometeorological services must be established. While in these participative approaches the understanding of farmers’ needs can be extended and used to redress and improve the existing situations earlier described. © 2014 Patron Editore S.r.l. All rights reserved.


Yazdanpanah H.,University of Isfahan | Stigter C.J.,Agromet Vision
Theoretical and Applied Climatology | Year: 2011

A so-called selective inverted sink (SIS) was validated in frost protection of a 20-ha almond orchard. Daily counts of flower buds were made for two branches of some selected almond trees in every plot to determine frost damage percentage. Temperatures increased due to the SIS system, but there was an average gradient of temperature decrease of about 0.4°C per 100 m with distance from the SIS. The minimum air temperature increased from 0.5 to 2.8°C, with the highest increase closest to the SIS. The percent of frost-damaged flower buds of almond relative to the control plot with distance to the SIS system had its maximum gradient (8% per 100 m) in 100-200-m distance from the SIS, but this gradient decreased to a minimum (4% per 100 m) in 500-700-m distance from the SIS. The ANOVA and Duncan's multiple-range test of air temperature and frost damage data confirm that the significant influence zone of this local SIS was about 500 m. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

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