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New Delhi, India

Agrawal K.K.,ricultural University | Singh P.K.,Agromet Service Cell
Mausam | Year: 2012

The daily rainfall data of past 31 years (1978-2008) of Agro meteorological Observatory, Department of Physics & Agriculture Engineering, Jabalpur (Madhya Pradesh) has been analyzed for establishing the long term average of weekly, monthly, seasonal and annual rainfall and its variability. The weekly probability of rainfall was estimated using Markov Chain probability model for receiving ≥ 10 and 30 mm rainfall per week. The mean annual rainfall observed as 1309 mm and its variability was 27.1 per cent. The highest annual and kharif season rainfall 2083 and 2052 mm respectively were recorded in 1994. On the other hand the lowest annual and kharif rainfall were 620 mm and 471 mm respectively in 1979. The study revealed that the recent decade rainfall has increased during last 31 years. The seasonal average kharif, post monsoon, winter and summer seasons recorded 1197.3 mm, 32.1 mm, 49.8 mm and 29.8 mm of rainfall. About 91.5 per cent of total annual rainfall was received in kharif, 2.5 per cent in post monsoon, 3.8 per cent in winter monsoon and 2.3 per cent in summer. During the period under study 16 per cent of the years recorded excess, 23 per cent deficit and 61 per cent normal rainfall. The July month is regarded as suitable for transplanting of rice crop in Jabalpur region. The highest contribution has been observed in August (33 per cent). Standard week from 25 to 37 received rainfall more than 30 mm indicating the crop growing period from June 2nd week to September last week. Source


Singh P.K.,Agromet Service Cell | Singh K.K.,Agromet Service Cell | Bhan S.C.,Agromet Service Cell | Baxla A.K.,Agromet Service Cell | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Agrometeorology | Year: 2015

Crop simulation models have been used to determine potential yield in a given environment. The twenty one years (1990-10) weather data and reported rice yield of Bhagalpur, Ranchi, Kalyani and Jorhat districts of eastern and north eastern region of India were used to simulate the yield under the various management conditions and compared with the reported yield of the districts. The management option included dates of sowing, irrigations and fertilizers application. The potential yield, attainable yield, yield gap etc were computed over the period. The results revealed that the rice yield of Kalyani and Ranchi districts showed increasing trend (30 to 65 kg ha-1yr-1) while decreasing trend was observed in Bhagalpur and Jorhat districts (6 to 9 kg ha-1yr-1). The potential yield simulated by model in different districts varied between 2864 to 4742 kg ha-1, while reported yield varied between 1159 to 2224 kg ha-1. The delay in sowing by 15 days caused reduction in rice yield by 31 to 74 kg ha-1day-1 at different locations. The management yield gap was between 1495 to 3216 kg ha-1 while sowing yield gap was between 467.4 to 1114.0 kg ha-1 in different districts under study. © 2015, Association of Agrometeorologists. All rights reserved. Source


Yadav M.K.,Banaras Hindu University | Singh R.S.,Banaras Hindu University | Singh K.K.,Agromet Service Cell | Mall R.K.,Banaras Hindu University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Agrometeorology | Year: 2016

Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT v4.6.1) was used to study the impact of climate change and variability on productivity of different monsoon (pigeonpea and groundnut) and winter season crops (chickpea, mustard, tomato and potato) at Varanasi. Keeping in view the observed trends in climate variability, productivity of different cash crops were simulated under plausible synthetic climatic scenarios of changes in temperature and carbon dioxide. Productivity of pigeonpea and groundnut in monsoon season and mustard, tomato and potato in winter season decreased with an increase in temperature. Productivity of different pulse, oilseed and vegetable crops increased under expected enhanced CO2 concentrations. Highest productivity decreased in pigeonpea crop (96.0%) in monsoon season and minimum in tomato crop (4.0%) in winter season with an increase of 3.0 °C in temperature above normal. Highest productivity increase in mustard crop (164.0%) in winter season and lowest in pigeonpea crop (33.0%) in monsoon season were simulated under projected enhanced CO2 concentration of 760 ppm. Highest counter-balance in productivity of mustard crop (150%) followed by tomato crop (81%) during winter season and lowest in pigeonpea crop (99%) during monsoon season were simulated when an increase in temperature by 3.0 °C above normal under projected enhanced CO2 concentration of 760 ppm. © 2016, Association of Agrometeorologists. All rights reserved. Source


Yadav M.K.,Banaras Hindu University | Singh R.S.,Banaras Hindu University | Singh K.K.,Agromet Service Cell | Mall R.K.,Banaras Hindu University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Agrometeorology | Year: 2015

Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT v4.5) Cropping System Model (CSM) was used to study the impact of climate change and variability on productivity of different kharif (rice, maize, jowar and bajra) and rabi crops (wheat and barley) at Varanasi. Keeping in view the observed trends in climate variability, productivity of different kharif and rabi crops were simulated under plausible synthetic climatic scenarios of changes in temperature, solar radiation and carbon dioxide. Productivity of kharif crops viz. rice, maize, jowar and bajra and rabi crops viz. wheat, and barley decreased with an increase in temperature or a decrease in solar radiation above normal. However, productivity of different kharif and rabi crops increased under expected enhanced CO2 concentrations. Highest productivity decreased in barley crop (40.7%) of rabi season and minimum in rice crop (5%) of kharif season with an increase of 3.0 0C in temperature from normal. Whereas, maximum productivity decreased in barley crop (5.0%) of rabi season and minimum in jowar crop (1.8%) of kharif season with a decrease of 2.5 per cent in solar radiation from normal. Highest productivity increase in barley crop (58.2%) of rabi season and lowest in jowar crop (4.2%) of kharif season were simulated under expected enhanced CO2 concentration of 660 ppm. The maximum decrease in productivity of barley crop (45%) in rabi season and minimum in rice crop (7%) in kharif season were simulated when a decrease in temperature by 30C and solar radiation by 2.5 percent from normal. Highest counter-balance on productivity of rice crop (13%) in kharif season and lowest in barja crop (-23%) of kharif season were simulated when an increase in temperature by 30C from normal under expected enhanced CO2 concentration of 660 ppm. © 2015, Association of Agrometeorologists. All rights reserved. Source


Singh P.K.,Agromet Service Cell | Rathore L.S.,Agromet Service Cell | Singh K.K.,Agromet Service Cell | Baxla A.K.,Agromet Service Cell | Mall R.K.,Campus Management
Mausam | Year: 2010

CERES-Maize model calibrated for local conditions of Sabour has been used to evaluate the relevance medium range weather forecast relative to the maize crop growth period. The procedure is to place the reference year's daily weather into the model up to the time the yield prediction is to be made and sequences of historical data (one sequence per year) after that time until the end of growing season to give yield estimates. A procedure that makes use of historical weather data, medium range weather forecast (mrwf) and current weather data in conjunction with the CERES-Maize model was developed to arrive at a probable distribution of predicted yields. The lower temperature and more solar radiation in tassel emergence to dough stage silk emergence to physiological maturity phase and lower maximum temperature are found favorable to contribute more in increasing the grain yields. The CERES- Maize model correlated for the genetic coefficient predicts the silking dates and physiological maturity very well. Kharif maize gave the highest grain yield of 3490 kg/ha in 1999 and the lowest of 2474 kg/ha in 1979. Among eight different sowing dates the lowest average grain yield was 3190 kg/ha for the last sowing date and the highest average grain yield was 3313 kg/ha in 2nd sowing date. The 25 percentiles were less than the mean grain yields and also 75 percentiles. Source

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